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200watt PSU for i5 3570k and 1x SSD?

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February 28, 2013 6:23:26 AM

I'm going to be building a system and need to build it in steps.

I have an old Dell 200watt PSU, and I'm wondering if that can handle the PC's needs for a month or two until I replace it with a solid PSU.

I'm looking at using a i5 3570k, and a 32GB SSD (SanDisk ReadyCache SDSSDRC-032G-G26 2.5" 32GB),
on a Z75 or Z77 board, with windows 7 h.p. 64-bit installed.

As I said, the PSU only needs to give me 1-2 months of time. No gaming, no video card, no cd/dvd playing,, just web browsing and a program that will use about 60% of one of the i5 cores.

Doable?


I could buy a $24 480w Logisys PS480D-BK, but would rather save the funds if the dell will do, and put the funds towards a solid PSU (Seasonic 430w or 620w).

More about : 200watt psu 3570k ssd

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a b B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2013 6:41:42 AM

It's really going to depend on the power supply. I mean technically it's a 77W processor, so, yeah you should be fine if it is really putting out 200W

If it is really old, there is a good chance the connectors won't work on a new motherboard.

If you aren't doing much with this computer, why a 3570K?

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February 28, 2013 6:56:51 AM

Right, have to check the connectors. I know it would need a SATA adapter. The only other one is the connection to the mobo.

Well the program that gets used (charting program) is only about 100MB, and it only uses about 100MB of RAM, but it requires fast: ram, processing, and hard drive read/writes. It needs to process the data in as close to real-time as possible. The 3570k is in order to get multiple cores, overclocking, 1600 memory, and HD 4000.
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a b B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2013 8:33:32 AM

200Watt PSU:
Very unlikely and not recommended. For one thing, I'd be surprised if it even had the proper 8-pin CPU cable (which even some modern PSU's don't have). When you do buy a PSU ensure:
- sufficient total power
- 8-pin CPU connector
- sufficient SATA connectors
- sufficient 6-pin/8-pin PCIe connectors for the graphics card you choose

SSD Readycache:
I assume you have a Hard Drive. Readycache is getting to be pointless. It's useless if you use an SSD already for Windows and you can purchase a 120GB SSD for about $100. Unless you have a Hard Drive and also got this Readycache for $30 or less your money is better put towards the 120GB SSD for Windows.

How will you USE the computer when finalized?
If it's for basic use there are cheaper solutions but I'm guessing it's for gaming.
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February 28, 2013 9:06:30 AM

my suggestion, dont buy the ssd (for now), get the PSU, then add the ssd next time. at least you know it's safe
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February 28, 2013 4:10:47 PM

photonboy said:
200Watt PSU:
Very unlikely and not recommended. For one thing, I'd be surprised if it even had the proper 8-pin CPU cable (which even some modern PSU's don't have). When you do buy a PSU ensure:
- sufficient total power
- 8-pin CPU connector
- sufficient SATA connectors
- sufficient 6-pin/8-pin PCIe connectors for the graphics card you choose

SSD Readycache:
I assume you have a Hard Drive. Readycache is getting to be pointless. It's useless if you use an SSD already for Windows and you can purchase a 120GB SSD for about $100. Unless you have a Hard Drive and also got this Readycache for $30 or less your money is better put towards the 120GB SSD for Windows.

How will you USE the computer when finalized?
If it's for basic use there are cheaper solutions but I'm guessing it's for gaming.


thanks
The 200w psu has only a 20-pin mobo connector. I'm 99% resolved to get a $19 500w logisys, which has a lot of 4-star ratings at newegg and amazon. That way, the PC will have a solid PSU, and I can take my time to replace it.
Replacement will either be :
SeaSonic S12II 430B
or
SeaSonic M12II 620
Both appear to have the 8-pin CPU connector, shown in the pictures.


For the SSD Readycache, I would be using it as a regular drive, not for caching another drive. I only chose that model for the low price ($40 at Micro center)


The PC build is dedicated to running a stock charting program. The total drive size requirements will be 20GB for win7 h.p. 64-bit, and about 1GB for the charting program and other programs (OpenOffice, screen snapshot software, etc). A 32GB drive will be fine, but ideally I'd like a 64 or 120 that I could add another more program to that will use a bit of space.

I'm looking at SSD (or SSD in RAID0 striping) because the charting program requires keeping the disk queue length (for writing) as close to zero as possible. The pieces of data are very small, but they are written at a rapid rate.
My current 7200rpm had a disk queue length of 20 at one point, so a SSD in SATA III 6GB, or couple in RAID0 should reduce the queue the best.
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February 28, 2013 4:34:55 PM

I just saw that the logisys 480w and 550w PSU's don't have 8-pin connectors.

I saw this - dual-molex to 8-pin adapter



These supply full power, right?

Would that work okay with a Logisys PS480D 480W?


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a b B Homebuilt system
February 28, 2013 8:55:49 PM

So you spend $15 + 5 shipping for the PSU and $5 + shipping for the power adapter, and then you are nearly $30 on a power supply that is pretty low quality. Sure it will work, but why not just spend $40-50 and do it the right way NOW and then you don't need to buy two power supplies. It it economical to spend $30 on a garbage PSU you are going to throw away?

Same with the SSD. 32GB is barely enough for Windows 7/8 and security updates. You are going to be tossing that in the can in a few months, too.

At some point you end up spending more money by being too cheap.


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March 7, 2013 12:27:37 AM

Best answer selected by jonjan.
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