Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Is it possible to build using dell or emachines case?

Last response: in Systems
Share
February 28, 2013 10:15:39 PM

I would like to know if I could build a system using my dell dimension E510 case or my eMachines W3650 case.

I have considered an upgrade but considering that the dell came with a pentium 4 3.00 ghz cpu and the emachines came with a celeron 440 cpu, so I don't think upgrading would really help much.

I have saw where someone posted about building inside their emachines T series case.

I know that I can get a case for around $40, but I need to cut costs at every place possible.


Here is a list of items I would like to put inside one of those cases.
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/GF9e

If there is a way to make the system better and cut cost I would love to hear.

Also I am looking to get items from Amazon and Newegg only.
February 28, 2013 11:35:10 PM

IDK about your particular computers, but I know that my old Dell Dimension E510 system can't have it's case reused (it was a custom case/mobo system), but I think that my eMachines case (I can't remember the exact model, but I think that it was a T series) can be re-used because it uses what seems to be a regular MicroATX form factor. You could try replacing the motherboard with your new motherboard (carefully) to check. If it fits, then great, if not, then you'll need a new case.
m
0
l
February 28, 2013 11:38:53 PM

Info:

You will be fine re-using either case. The only addition you might want to consider is a couple of 90/120mm case fans. One for intake on the front and the other for exhaust on the rear. Just check your mounting space prior to ordering. As a note, when you pull your old mb out, make a note of which front panel leads go to the power switch, reset, hdd, etc. The risers on your dell mb should be marked. That way, you won't have to guess when you wire your new mb.

Also, make sure you clean the dust bunnies out of the case before you put your new baby together.

Good luck,

Mark
m
0
l
Related resources
February 28, 2013 11:55:37 PM

Info:

I stand corrected. That series of Dells did have a funky setup. I think it was a mATX board, but I think it also had some type of custom mounting hole layout.

Nice catch Blazrthon!

Mark
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 12:54:40 AM

Thank you all very much for the information. Is there anyway I could possibly contact Dell or eMachines and ask them if the motherboard had a standard mATX mounting hole layout?
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 1:01:22 AM

I don't see why not, but IDK if they'd have a good answer for such old systems. It'd probably be easier to just compare it to your new board.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 1:19:54 AM

Thank you again. I don't really want to buy everything just to find out that the board will not mount into any system and then have the mobo and all the components laying around until I can get up enough money to buy a case. I am horrible with keeping up with things and there's children that love to play with everything lol
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 1:24:50 AM

Ehh, you could get a cheap case for $20-30 or so if necessary. Do you absolutely not have the budget for that? If so, then you could consider getting a cheaper B75 motherboard, a cheaper DDR3-1333 2x4GB memory kit (dual-channel, it'll still be better than DDR3-1600 single channel while being cheaper), and if still necessary (it shouldn't be, but I'll prepare for the possibility), a cheaper CPU (there are i3s available for a little bit less money).
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 2:05:33 AM

Thank you again. I was not aware that dual channel DDR3-1333 would out perform a single DDR3-1600.

Could you give me some information about the motherboards. As far as the B75, the H77, Z77, and so forth? I am able to build it but I don't understand all the differences between all the components. That is why I provided the list. If you are going to break it down for me, please try to dumb it down for me as much as possible. Also the same goes with the processors.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 2:11:51 AM

Z77 is mostly just for overclockers. H77 is similar, but with a few overclocking features disabled. B75 is pretty much H77, but with a little less connectivity (IE one less SATA 6Gb/s port). Give me a minute and I'll post a good B75 board to bring your budget down.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 2:50:55 AM

That one only seems to have 1 PCI slot. I am needing at least 2. I forgot to mention that the system will be using a wireless networking card.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 2:53:07 AM

OK, I see what you may need one slot for, but why do you need the second slot?
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 3:49:43 AM

the graphics card. If I am not mistaken I added the Sapphire Radeon HD 6570 card onto the parts picker list.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 5:21:06 AM

The graphics card uses a PCIe slot, not a PCI slot. I don't see the problem.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 5:52:46 AM

From looking at the board, there does not seem to be a slot for the wireless networking card. The picture only shows the PCI Express 3.0x16 (the biggest slot) and a PCI Express x1 slot. (the smallest slot)

The board does not have the regular PCI slot
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 6:16:41 AM

InfoSeeker01 said:
the graphics card. If I am not mistaken I added the Sapphire Radeon HD 6570 card onto the parts picker list.

There is only about a $5 difference between the 6570 and the 6670 which is a better performer.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 6:19:28 AM

If the GPU does not get in the way, you can get a PCIx1 slot wireless card.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 6:22:57 AM

thank you, i will check it out, but I am trying to cut cost every where I can, use the components I already have, and still have a decent system. That is why I am trying to find out if I can use a dell dimension e510 case or an emachines w3650 case.

Also I have found out that the dell has a Foxconn G33M-S Micro ATX form factor main board. I don't know if that information helps to determine if the case can be reused or not.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 9:44:38 AM

InfoSeeker01 said:
thank you, i will check it out, but I am trying to cut cost every where I can, use the components I already have, and still have a decent system. That is why I am trying to find out if I can use a dell dimension e510 case or an emachines w3650 case.

Also I have found out that the dell has a Foxconn G33M-S Micro ATX form factor main board. I don't know if that information helps to determine if the case can be reused or not.



The problem is OEMs like Dell have motherboards made for them, specifically. Just because the board seems to have a standard part number does not mean it will be an exact match for what should be the same retail board. OEM builders will purposely have parts designed to make them unique to their system, they don't want you upgrading their systems, they want you to buy a new one. The only thing you can do for certain is try to fit the parts into the case when you get them, if they fit, great! If they don't, you'll have to get a case.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 3:47:15 PM

Thank you, I understand this. I provided the information about the board in case someone knows that this board maker is associated with making them customized for the purpose of not being able to replace with aftermarket.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 4:37:33 PM

jitpublisher said:
The problem is OEMs like Dell have motherboards made for them, specifically. Just because the board seems to have a standard part number does not mean it will be an exact match for what should be the same retail board. OEM builders will purposely have parts designed to make them unique to their system, they don't want you upgrading their systems, they want you to buy a new one. The only thing you can do for certain is try to fit the parts into the case when you get them, if they fit, great! If they don't, you'll have to get a case.


Yeah that's a common problem that people have when they want to reuse their cases. And that's usually why I'm against people buying pre built rigs from manufacturers like Dell or HP. OEMs like Dell and HP will have custom parts tailored to their cases - and that includes motherboards and the power supplies are usually integrated into the case itself. Then they use low power, low profile GPUs and the cases don't have support for the longer graphics cards that we're used to.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 5:39:02 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Yeah that's a common problem that people have when they want to reuse their cases. And that's usually why I'm against people buying pre built rigs from manufacturers like Dell or HP. OEMs like Dell and HP will have custom parts tailored to their cases - and that includes motherboards and the power supplies are usually integrated into the case itself. Then they use low power, low profile GPUs and the cases don't have support for the longer graphics cards that we're used to.


I don't think that it's normal for PSUs to be integrated into the case for desktops. I've never seen that except in some very small form factor systems and laptops.
m
0
l
March 1, 2013 6:09:07 PM

blazorthon said:
I don't think that it's normal for PSUs to be integrated into the case for desktops. I've never seen that except in some very small form factor systems and laptops.


I've seen a few Acer and eMachines models with integrated power supplies. I think my brother's old Dell uses some form of it too.
m
0
l
March 3, 2013 12:25:11 PM

blazorthon said:
I don't think that it's normal for PSUs to be integrated into the case for desktops. I've never seen that except in some very small form factor systems and laptops.



Its pretty common, or it used to be anyhow, the PSU will have screw holes and a fan placement that won't line up with any other type of case, and the power connectors may unique to the motherboard as well.
m
0
l
March 7, 2013 1:14:31 PM

jitpublisher said:
Its pretty common, or it used to be anyhow, the PSU will have screw holes and a fan placement that won't line up with any other type of case, and the power connectors may unique to the motherboard as well.


Well, even my Dell system with a non-standard motherboard setup uses a standard power supply and so do almost all of the larger form factor systems that I've seen. They also use standard power connectors. I don't think that we've had non-standard PSUs even in OEM systems except for some very old Dell systems, older than mine which is from 2004 IIRC. OEM systems generally use standard power supplies from what I've seen even if they use other components that aren't ATX/MicroATX/etc. compatible.
m
0
l
!