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SLI power supply

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January 13, 2013 12:14:40 PM

So for the past year I've been using a Galaxy MDT gtx 580 which runs pretty nicely and I have yet seen any issues with. I started to have this crazy idea (....derp) of wanting SLI. Now the individual card itself has a min req of 600W which my TX750 Corsair can handle. Now here are some of my questions:

Does that mean if I SLI another it would use 1200W?

What would I be able to compare the MDT gtx 580 to if I were to choose a different path for SLI?

Since the card has 3 fans, will having 2 gtx 580 help with lowering noise level since it would even out the stress between 2 cards?

Is it even worth it to SLI this card?

Sorry if any of these questions have been answered previously. I'm kind of a noob when it comes to all this.

More about : sli power supply

a b U Graphics card
a b ) Power supply
January 13, 2013 12:20:24 PM

750W is enough to SLI 2 580s. To be honest, I think you should keep the card for a while and upgrade to next gen highest end card (or 2nd highest depending on improvement over this gen). You could upgrade to a 670/680 but I don't think it's worth it.
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January 13, 2013 12:24:23 PM

100586112 said:
So for the past year I've been using a Galaxy MDT gtx 580 which runs pretty nicely and I have yet seen any issues with. I started to have this crazy idea (....derp) of wanting SLI. Now the individual card itself has a min req of 600W which my TX750 Corsair can handle. Now here are some of my questions:

Does that mean if I SLI another it would use 1200W?

What would I be able to compare the MDT gtx 580 to if I were to choose a different path for SLI?

Since the card has 3 fans, will having 2 gtx 580 help with lowering noise level since it would even out the stress between 2 cards?

Is it even worth it to SLI this card?

Sorry if any of these questions have been answered previously. I'm kind of a noob when it comes to all this.


I would SLI the card if you could find it used for around $200. Also the 600w minimum requirement is for the entire system not the graphics card.

http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/geforce_gtx_580_sl...
You actually should be OK on your current PSU. ^^
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January 13, 2013 12:29:17 PM

EzioAs said:
750W is enough to SLI 2 580s. To be honest, I think you should keep the card for a while and upgrade to next gen highest end card (or 2nd highest depending on improvement over this gen). You could upgrade to a 670/680 but I don't think it's worth it.


580 SLI outperforms 7970/680.
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January 13, 2013 12:29:27 PM

samuelspark said:
I would SLI the card if you could find it used for around $200. Also the 600w minimum requirement is for the entire system not the graphics card.

http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/geforce_gtx_580_sl...
You actually should be OK on your current PSU. ^^


Ahh.. omg thank you so much. This card is hard to find for $200.00. It's been discontinued everywhere and even if people still have stock, they jacked the price. :(  sad
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January 13, 2013 12:33:04 PM

Don't SLI 580. Get one of the newer GTX's, like a 670.

As a general rule, don't SLI (or Crossfire) anything but the top tier cards. Older cards aren't updated, so they won't have SLI profiles for newer games and will perform, possibly, very poorly.

As to the PSU question, well, there's two answers.

1. An 850watt, *good* PSU is enough for most any SLI or Crossfire situation. Never cheap out and buy an "okay" or bad PSU. They are one of the most important parts of the computer.

2. If you want to run your PC as efficiently and quietly as possible, you want to get a PSU that you will use around 60% of during heavy use. This is the area in which they are most cost effective and generally their fans have only hit around a third of their speed. It's no cheap and it's not needed, so many people won't do it. But you pay for the premium.

750watt - cutting it close. Not recommended, but possible.
850watt - fine. No problem.
1200watt - better. More expensive and unnecessary, but more efficient and cooler temps.

Stick to solid brands, too. I can't stress how important it is to get a solid PSU. Corsair make some great units. As do Seasonic and Cooler Master, but do lots of research into the exact PSU before buying.

I'd be happy to lay out some examples of good GPU upgrades for you. You just need to tell me what you want it to do and if you could, tell us your CPU and motherboard. But I'd recommend not trying SLI with your current card.
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January 13, 2013 12:33:55 PM

samuelspark said:
580 SLI outperforms 7970/680.


Of course they do. I knew that. However, I prefer and will usually recommend people going single card rather than going SLI/crossfire.
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January 13, 2013 12:35:51 PM

MatildaPersson said:
Don't SLI 580. Get one of the newer GTX's, like a 670.

As a general rule, don't SLI (or Crossfire) anything but the top tier cards. Older cards aren't updated, so they won't have SLI profiles for newer games and will perform, possibly, very poorly.

As to the PSU question, well, there's two answers.

1. An 850watt, *good* PSU is enough for most any SLI or Crossfire situation. Never cheap out and buy an "okay" or bad PSU. They are one of the most important parts of the computer.

2. If you want to run your PC as efficiently and quietly as possible, you want to get a PSU that you will use around 60% of during heavy use. This is the area in which they are most cost effective and generally their fans have only hit around a third of their speed. It's no cheap and it's not needed, so many people won't do it. But you pay for the premium.

750watt - cutting it close. Not recommended, but possible.
850watt - fine. No problem.
1200watt - better. More expensive and unnecessary, but more efficient and cooler temps.

Stick to solid brands, too. I can't stress how important it is to get a solid PSU. Corsair make some great units. As do Seasonic and Cooler Master, but do lots of research into the exact PSU before buying.

I'd be happy to lay out some examples of good GPU upgrades for you. You just need to tell me what you want it to do and if you could, tell us your CPU and motherboard. But I'd recommend not trying SLI with your current card.


That's not how it works...
580 SLI only consumed 720w when using a heavily overclocked first gen i7 extreme edition with water cooling and such creating about 50-100w above the average user. A 750w will be perfectly fine with headroom. Also, as I said, 580 SLI (590) outperforms any single high end GPU of this generation. The 580 was also the best card last gen.
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January 13, 2013 12:39:23 PM

MatildaPersson said:
Don't SLI 580. Get one of the newer GTX's, like a 670.

As a general rule, don't SLI (or Crossfire) anything but the top tier cards. Older cards aren't updated, so they won't have SLI profiles for newer games and will perform, possibly, very poorly.

As to the PSU question, well, there's two answers.

1. An 850watt, *good* PSU is enough for most any SLI or Crossfire situation. Never cheap out and buy an "okay" or bad PSU. They are one of the most important parts of the computer.

2. If you want to run your PC as efficiently and quietly as possible, you want to get a PSU that you will use around 60% of during heavy use. This is the area in which they are most cost effective and generally their fans have only hit around a third of their speed. It's no cheap and it's not needed, so many people won't do it. But you pay for the premium.

750watt - cutting it close. Not recommended, but possible.
850watt - fine. No problem.
1200watt - better. More expensive and unnecessary, but more efficient and cooler temps.

Stick to solid brands, too. I can't stress how important it is to get a solid PSU. Corsair make some great units. As do Seasonic and Cooler Master, but do lots of research into the exact PSU before buying.

I'd be happy to lay out some examples of good GPU upgrades for you. You just need to tell me what you want it to do and if you could, tell us your CPU and motherboard. But I'd recommend not trying SLI with your current card.


I agree with you recommending Seasonic and Corsair but not Cooler Master. However, this probably applies best to their lower end units so it's not a clear cut situation.

750W is more than enough. It's not barely. Most reviewers calculate the power consumption from the wall (which is always more than the DC power the system actually needs).
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January 13, 2013 12:44:27 PM

samuelspark said:
That's not how it works...
580 SLI only consumed 720w when using a heavily overclocked first gen i7 extreme edition with water cooling and such creating about 50-100w above the average user. A 750w will be perfectly fine with headroom. Also, as I said, 580 SLI (590) outperforms any single high end GPU of this generation. The 580 was also the best card last gen.

SLI with older cards is simply a bad idea. No updates to their drivers and no modern SLI profiles means bad things. Two mid range cards make more noise, more heat and use more power than one good, high end card. With the addition of the update problem, SLI with old cards becomes simply not worth the money. Add a slight bit more and get a good card.

As to the PSU: being over 75% or so of a PSU's max output is fine, but not ideal. As I said, most PSU's are made with fans that don't kick in until around 25% load and warm up and become louder the more they are used. They also lose efficiently the closer to their limit you go, meaning they send more power through the lines, but deliver less and have more dirty power -- or power that has dips and drops.

Around 60% is the place to be for the best performance. It's not the cheap option and it's a luxury, but it's the way it goes.
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January 13, 2013 12:45:39 PM

EzioAs said:
I agree with you recommending Seasonic and Corsair but not Cooler Master. However, this probably applies best to their lower end units so it's not a clear cut situation.

750W is more than enough. It's not barely. Most reviewers calculate the power consumption from the wall (which is always more than the DC power the system actually needs).

Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't Seasonic make both Corsair's and Cooler Master's PSU's? Not all of them, perhaps, but some? I know they make the high end Corsair line.
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January 13, 2013 12:48:37 PM

Corsair TX750
Galaxy MDT GTX 580
G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4x x 4gb) DDR3 1866
i5-2500K Sandy Bridge
Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 7200RPM
ASUS DRW-241st
ASUS P8Z68-V PRO

That's my current build so far as I can remember off the top of my head.

So overall if I were to be able to find a card that is at the range of $200 or lower, then would it be worth my time to do it?

Sorry I'm not understanding how the SLI profiles work. So techinically speaking if I played BF3. It may not be compatible?
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January 13, 2013 12:51:17 PM

MatildaPersson said:
Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't Seasonic make both Corsair's and Cooler Master's PSU's? Not all of them, perhaps, but some? I know they make the high end Corsair line.


I know Seasonic makes Corsair's current AX series (not the AXi, the standard AX), but I don't know about Cooler Master OEM. Most of their units are tier 3 at best, while most of Corsair or seasonic units are tier 1 or 2 anyway. This is just about the psu, I love CM's peripherals and cases though.
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January 13, 2013 12:56:26 PM

100586112 said:
Corsair TX750
Galaxy MDT GTX 580
G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4x x 4gb) DDR3 1866
i5-2500K Sandy Bridge
Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 7200RPM
ASUS DRW-241st
ASUS P8Z68-V PRO

That's my current build so far as I can remember off the top of my head.

So overall if I were to be able to find a card that is at the range of $200 or lower, then would it be worth my time to do it?

Sorry I'm not understanding how the SLI profiles work. So techinically speaking if I played BF3. It may not be compatible?

That motherboard isn't ideal to use in SLI, as it will use dual PCI 2 x8 mode. That's quite slow. You want PCI 3 x16 or x8. Plugging in a second card will probably be noticeably worse, to be honest.

The way SLI works is each card renders every second frame, like this:

Card 1: frames 1, 3, 5, 7, 9
Card 2: frames 2, 4, 6, 8, 10

Nvidia update the drivers of the modern cards to do this as best as possible. They release "SLI profiles" for individual games.

If the cards are out of sync, usually thanks to lacking a profile or having a bad one, they cause microstutter, which is like screen tearing, but worse. SLI with modern cards rarely sees microstutter and most people will not notice any. But some people are unlucky and get a lot of it. It's something to be aware of.
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January 13, 2013 12:57:08 PM

100586112 said:
Corsair TX750
Galaxy MDT GTX 580
G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (4x x 4gb) DDR3 1866
i5-2500K Sandy Bridge
Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 7200RPM
ASUS DRW-241st
ASUS P8Z68-V PRO

That's my current build so far as I can remember off the top of my head.

So overall if I were to be able to find a card that is at the range of $200 or lower, then would it be worth my time to do it?

Sorry I'm not understanding how the SLI profiles work. So techinically speaking if I played BF3. It may not be compatible?


SLI in BF3 works fine however it may not be that way in other games. Take GTA4 for example, that game doesn't even support SLI. Sometime, the scaling are also too low and really bumps people spending that much money for graphics card. That's why I always recommend 1 card over 2.

For me, SLI/crossfire is only applicable best under the condition that you have either one of the two top cards (680/670 or 7970/7950 for the current gen) and you want more performance because it's not enough for you especially if it's 2560x1440/2560x1600 or multi-monitor.
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January 13, 2013 12:58:17 PM

MatildaPersson said:
Don't SLI 580. Get one of the newer GTX's, like a 670.

As a general rule, don't SLI (or Crossfire) anything but the top tier cards. Older cards aren't updated, so they won't have SLI profiles for newer games and will perform, possibly, very poorly.

As to the PSU question, well, there's two answers.

1. An 850watt, *good* PSU is enough for most any SLI or Crossfire situation. Never cheap out and buy an "okay" or bad PSU. They are one of the most important parts of the computer.

2. If you want to run your PC as efficiently and quietly as possible, you want to get a PSU that you will use around 60% of during heavy use. This is the area in which they are most cost effective and generally their fans have only hit around a third of their speed. It's no cheap and it's not needed, so many people won't do it. But you pay for the premium.

750watt - cutting it close. Not recommended, but possible.
850watt - fine. No problem.
1200watt - better. More expensive and unnecessary, but more efficient and cooler temps.

Stick to solid brands, too. I can't stress how important it is to get a solid PSU. Corsair make some great units. As do Seasonic and Cooler Master, but do lots of research into the exact PSU before buying.

I'd be happy to lay out some examples of good GPU upgrades for you. You just need to tell me what you want it to do and if you could, tell us your CPU and motherboard. But I'd recommend not trying SLI with your current card.


And who's general rule is that? Because I don't see it written in stone anywhere, in fact that "General rule" can pucker up and kiss my chocolate starfish! :pfff: 
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January 13, 2013 12:58:49 PM

EzioAs said:
I know Seasonic makes Corsair's current AX series (not the AXi, the standard AX), but I don't know about Cooler Master OEM. Most of their units are tier 3 at best, while most of Corsair or seasonic units are tier 1 or 2 anyway. This is just about the psu, I love CM's peripherals and cases though.
I've found the high end cooler master PSU's to be splendid, myself.

I'm a total Corsair fangirl, though. I love most everything they release. It's always such good quality.
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January 13, 2013 1:00:36 PM

MatildaPersson said:
That motherboard isn't ideal to use in SLI, as it will use dual PCI 2 x8 mode. That's quite slow. You want PCI 3 x16 or x8. Plugging in a second card will probably be noticeably worse, to be honest.


It's ideal. PCIe 2.0 x8=PCIe 1.0 x16 and still provides enough bandwidth for cards like the 580. This is proof of it http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Intel/Ivy_Bridge_PCI...
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January 13, 2013 1:03:22 PM

Mousemonkey said:
And who's general rule is that? Because I don't see it written in stone anywhere, in fact that "General rule" can pucker up and kiss my chocolate starfish! :pfff: 
That's an odd way for a moderator to act. Rather silly.

You'll find most industry professionals won't tell you to delve into SLI or Crossfire with anything but the higher end cards for the obvious reasons: noise, heat and electricity. SLI and Crossfire are designed for maximum performance, not to buff lower cards up a notch.
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January 13, 2013 1:04:43 PM

MatildaPersson said:
That motherboard isn't ideal to use in SLI, as it will use dual PCI 2 x8 mode. That's quite slow. You want PCI 3 x16 or x8. Plugging in a second card will probably be noticeably worse, to be honest.

The way SLI works is each card renders every second frame, like this:

Card 1: frames 1, 3, 5, 7, 9
Card 2: frames 2, 4, 6, 8, 10

Nvidia update the drivers of the modern cards to do this as best as possible. They release "SLI profiles" for individual games.

If the cards are out of sync, usually thanks to lacking a profile or having a bad one, they cause microstutter, which is like screen tearing, but worse. SLI with modern cards rarely sees microstutter and most people will not notice any. But some people are unlucky and get a lot of it. It's something to be aware of.


Dual x8 is actually pretty good considering the fact that the 580 doesn't fill the bandwidth. x8 is pretty much the highest you are going to see on a standard motherboard anyway.
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January 13, 2013 1:06:35 PM

MatildaPersson said:
Ah, but who would run 580's in SLI? :p 


Yes, I agree OP shouldn't go SLI 580 either.
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January 13, 2013 1:07:35 PM

samuelspark said:
Dual x8 is actually pretty good considering the fact that the 580 doesn't fill the bandwidth. x8 is pretty much the highest you are going to see on a standard motherboard anyway.

Dual x8 what? PCI 3? Sure. 1? Not so much lol.

The better 1155 socket boards go right up to dual x16, I think. Obviously a lot of the 2011's do.
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January 13, 2013 1:07:51 PM

MatildaPersson said:
That's an odd way for a moderator to act. Rather silly.

You'll find most industry professionals won't tell you to delve into SLI or Crossfire with anything but the higher end cards for the obvious reasons: noise, heat and electricity. SLI and Crossfire are designed for maximum performance, not to buff lower cards up a notch.


You obviously don't seem to understand that the GTX 580 was the best GPU last Gen and still remains very powerful.
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January 13, 2013 1:09:50 PM

samuelspark said:
You obviously don't seem to understand that the GTX 580 was the best GPU last Gen and still remains very powerful.

Problem is, it's not updated like the 600's and the SLI profiles will render SLI in new games moot.

Nothing wrong with the card. Its just not what you want to SLI with.
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January 13, 2013 1:18:04 PM

MatildaPersson said:
Don't SLI 580. Get one of the newer GTX's, like a 670.




A single 580 is nearly as fast as a 670, so that would be a complete waste of money. Not only that, 580 SLI is MUCH, MUCH faster than a 670 (or even a 680), and it isn't far behind a 690. In addition, SLI works substantially better than it used to - scaling is very good on nearly all games. Finally, as far as SLI profiles are concerned, the 580 is only 1 generation old. Nvidia is in no danger of stopping support anytime soon. Nvidia tends to be very good at keeping drivers and SLI profiles up to date for the high end cards (and I don't know why you keep talking about mid range cards - the 580 was the top GPU of the 500 series). The latest driver still supports the 8800 Ultra, for example, even though that card is closing in on 6 years old. By the time they stop supporting the 580 SLI, they won't be far from stopping support on the 600 series either, and both the 580 and 670/680 will be thoroughly obsolete.

Basically, if you can find a 580 for a good price, SLI would be a great idea if you want a bit of extra performance. It would bring your system to near-690 levels of performance, for substantially less money than a 690. As for the PSU, a good 750 (such as your Corsair) should be fine, so long as the rest of your system isn't extremely power hungry (as long as you don't have a heavily overclocked 120W processor and 6 hard drives, you should be fine). 580 SLI is a wonderful setup, and I'm sure you'll be extremely happy with it if you end up going for it (I say that as the very happy owner of a 580 SLI setup, which will run pretty much anything at full settings on my 30 inch monitor).
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January 13, 2013 1:24:21 PM

@cjl

I'm not saying a single or dual 580 isn't powerful but at the current time, what I think is best is for OP to stay with single card (considering that it's still very powerful) and get the next gen highest end offering especially taken power efficiency into account.
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January 13, 2013 1:25:25 PM

MatildaPersson said:
That's an odd way for a moderator to act. Rather silly.

You'll find most industry professionals won't tell you to delve into SLI or Crossfire with anything but the higher end cards for the obvious reasons: noise, heat and electricity. SLI and Crossfire are designed for maximum performance, not to buff lower cards up a notch.


Why would I or any one else who likes to build their own rigs give a stuff about these so called "industry professionals"? :heink: 
Who are these people? Can you identify them for us?
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January 13, 2013 1:25:54 PM

cjl said:
http://static.rcgroups.net/forums/attachments/7/0/1/4/2/a4051682-217-DOUBLE-FACEPALM-600x480.jpg?d=1306873439

A single 580 is nearly as fast as a 670, so that would be a complete waste of money. Not only that, 580 SLI is MUCH, MUCH faster than a 670 (or even a 680), and it isn't far behind a 690. In addition, SLI works substantially better than it used to - scaling is very good on nearly all games. Finally, as far as SLI profiles are concerned, the 580 is only 1 generation old. Nvidia is in no danger of stopping support anytime soon. Nvidia tends to be very good at keeping drivers and SLI profiles up to date for the high end cards (and I don't know why you keep talking about mid range cards - the 580 was the top GPU of the 500 series). The latest driver still supports the 8800 Ultra, for example, even though that card is closing in on 6 years old. By the time they stop supporting the 580 SLI, they won't be far from stopping support on the 600 series either, and both the 580 and 670/680 will be thoroughly obsolete.

Basically, if you can find a 580 for a good price, SLI would be a great idea if you want a bit of extra performance. It would bring your system to near-690 levels of performance, for substantially less money than a 690. As for the PSU, a good 750 (such as your Corsair) should be fine, so long as the rest of your system isn't extremely power hungry (as long as you don't have a heavily overclocked 120W processor and 6 hard drives, you should be fine). 580 SLI is a wonderful setup, and I'm sure you'll be extremely happy with it if you end up going for it (I say that as the very happy owner of a 580 SLI setup, which will run pretty much anything at full settings on my 30 inch monitor).

It's under 60fps here.



As I've been saying, the card is fine. It's not top of the line, but it's certainly a fine card to have. But don't buy a second older generation card for SLI.
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January 13, 2013 1:30:06 PM

Mousemonkey said:
Why would I or any one else who likes to build their own rigs give a stuff about these so called "industry professionals"? :heink: 
Who are these people? Can you identify them for us?

Why should you care what intelligent people that make a living knowing about the topic ("industry professionals") think on the details of your interest? I'd have thought that question would answer itself. Or do you not read articles and do research written by said people, such as those posted here, on this website you represent? If you do, then your comment is moot.

I'm not going to converse with you if your only mode of dialog is to be as sharp and arrogant as possible.
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January 13, 2013 1:31:05 PM

MatildaPersson said:
It's under 60fps here.

http://static.techspot.com/articles-info/577/bench/2560.png

As I've been saying, the card is fine. It's not top of the line, but it's certainly a fine card to have. But don't buy a second older generation card for SLI.


A single 580 is at 55 FPS at the highest quality setting at 2560x1600, which is only 14FPS behind the fastest current gen card. It's also plenty fast as long as there are no significant dips in framerate (which is impossible to judge based on that chart alone). I'd say that's not bad at all, and it would certainly be a waste of money to buy a 680 for that modest of a gain (especially when I would bet that a 580 SLI setup would be WAY above 60FPS at those same settings).
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January 13, 2013 1:37:15 PM

cjl said:
A single 580 is at 55 FPS at the highest quality setting at 2560x1600, which is only 14FPS behind the fastest current gen card. It's also plenty fast as long as there are no significant dips in framerate (which is impossible to judge based on that chart alone). I'd say that's not bad at all, and it would certainly be a waste of money to buy a 680 for that modest of a gain (especially when I would bet a pretty substantial amount of money that a 580 SLI setup would be WAY above 60FPS at those same settings).

Why would you be using SLI in medium resolutions? It's assumed you're going to be using large monitors if you want to run an SLI setup.

Again, there's no reason to run two 580's if you don't already. Either keep your one, perfectly fine card and enjoy it for a while to come yet. Or upgrade to the current top-tier and SLI there.
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January 13, 2013 1:37:34 PM

Oh, and to answer a question in the OP that appears to be unanswered to this point, no, SLI will not reduce noise level. It will increase it. It won't even out the workload - instead, you will now have 2 cards working at full speed, so the heat level will be substantially higher. Performance will be significantly improved though.
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January 13, 2013 1:44:11 PM

MatildaPersson said:
Why would you be using SLI in medium resolutions? It's assumed you're going to be using large monitors if you want to run an SLI setup.

Again, there's no reason to run two 580's if you don't already. Either keep your one, perfectly fine card and enjoy it for a while to come yet. Or upgrade to the current top-tier and SLI there.


Since when is 2560x1600 a medium resolution?

As for your later statement, a pair of 580s ranges from about 60% as fast as a pair of 680s worst case up to about even with them best case (see here). On average, they're about 20% slower. A single 580 (to upgrade the existing system) can be had for $400 (possibly even less, depending on where you get it), while a GTX 680 costs around $470. So, for less than the cost of a single 680, you can have substantially more performance (or, alternatively, for around 40% the cost of 680 SLI, you can have 80% of the performance). It would make no sense at all to upgrade to 680 SLI.
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January 13, 2013 1:46:40 PM

MatildaPersson said:
Why should you care what intelligent people that make a living knowing about the topic ("industry professionals") think on the details of your interest? I'd have thought that question would answer itself. Or do you not read articles and do research written by said people, such as those posted here, on this website you represent? If you do, then your comment is moot.

I'm not going to converse with you if your only mode of dialog is to be as sharp and arrogant as possible.


My personal experience far outweighs what you (some random person on the internet) says that what other people say matters. Other people that you can't even identify.
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January 13, 2013 1:48:10 PM

cjl said:
Since when is 2560x1600 a medium resolution?

As for your later statement, a pair of 580s ranges from about 60% as fast as a pair of 680s worst case up to about even with them best case (see here). On average, they're about 20% slower. A single 580 (to upgrade the existing system) can be had for $400 (possibly even less, depending on where you get it), while a GTX 680 costs around $470. So, for less than the cost of a single 680, you can have 80% of the performance of a pair of them (or, alternatively, for around 40% the cost of 680 SLI, you can have 80% of the performance). It would make no sense at all to upgrade to 680 SLI.

I didn't say it was a medium resolution. I said why would you use anything less than high resolution with SLI, as you seemed to be implying the resolution was exceptional in the context of your last comment.

I guess we are coming at this from different angles. I don't see the point in spending money to improve a perfectly fine card, when you can spend money and get a fantastic set of cards. In or out. All or nothing. Improving on the 580 at this point just seems odd to me. My husband and I just stick with what we have, or spend the money and get the performance.
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January 13, 2013 1:49:34 PM

Mousemonkey said:
My personal experience far outweighs what you (some random person on the internet) says that what other people say matters. Other people that you can't even identify.


Nope. Your personal experience is worth nothing. Similarly, my personal experience is also worth nothing. Even though we've both built computers with SLI (and mine actually has the exact config being discussed here - a pair of 580s), our experience means nothing compared to a reference to a nameless expert computer industry professional.


;) 
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January 13, 2013 1:51:03 PM

Mousemonkey said:
My personal experience far outweighs what you (some random person on the internet) says that what other people say matters. Other people that you can't even identify.

If you aren't concerned with what others have to say, namely professionals, why are you here, on this site dedicated to professionals reviewing hardware and delivering to you news on the latest and greatest and their features? Can we assume you don't read reviews or anything published on the internet, here or elsewhere? An odd thing for a moderator to admit to.
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January 13, 2013 1:51:39 PM

cjl said:
Nope. Your personal experience is worth nothing. Similarly, my personal experience is also worth nothing. Even though we've both built computers with SLI (and mine actually has the exact config being discussed here - a pair of 580s), our experience means nothing compared to a reference to a nameless expert computer industry professional.


;) 

Meh, you're only a rocket scientist. What do you know? :lol: 
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January 13, 2013 1:52:23 PM

MatildaPersson said:
My husband and I just stick with what we have, or spend the money and get the performance.

Why spend more than twice as much for a 20% gain though? It isn't like the 580 is suddenly worthless - it's still one of the fastest single GPUs in existence, and it makes no sense to me to throw away a perfectly good 580 just because the 680 is now available.
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January 13, 2013 1:52:59 PM

Mousemonkey said:
Meh, you're only a rocket scientist. What do you know? :lol: 


Nothing at all, actually.

(I'm just really good at hiding that fact :sol:  )
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January 13, 2013 1:53:34 PM

MatildaPersson said:
If you aren't concerned with what others have to say, namely professionals, why are you here, on this site dedicated to professionals reviewing hardware and delivering to you news on the latest and greatest and their features? Can we assume you don't read reviews or anything published on the internet, here or elsewhere? An odd thing for a moderator to admit to.

I admitted to that? :??:  :lol: 

Do you have an Apple phone by any chance?
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January 13, 2013 1:55:23 PM

cjl said:
Why spend more than twice as much for a 20% gain though? It isn't like the 580 is suddenly worthless - it's still one of the fastest single GPUs in existence, and it makes no sense to me to throw away a perfectly good 580 just because the 680 is now available.

I would ask the opposite; if you are going to upgrade, why not upgrade more? I don't like to stop half way down the road if I'm going to walk down it.
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January 13, 2013 1:56:27 PM

Mousemonkey said:
I admitted to that? :??:  :lol: 

Do you have an Apple phone by any chance?


Don't you think this has gotten a little bit off topic? Maybe you guys could just PM each other
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January 13, 2013 1:57:10 PM

MatildaPersson said:
If you aren't concerned with what others have to say, namely professionals, why are you here, on this site dedicated to professionals reviewing hardware and delivering to you news on the latest and greatest and their features? Can we assume you don't read reviews or anything published on the internet, here or elsewhere? An odd thing for a moderator to admit to.


I would be very curious to see a recent quote from an industry professional stating that SLI is only worthwhile with the latest generation, top-of-the-line cards. I haven't seen anything like that in any reviews, product recommendations, or build guides in the past several years (and in fact, I can recall having read the opposite several times - I've seen lower end SLI recommended over a single top end card, since it frequently gives a better bang for the buck).
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January 13, 2013 1:57:24 PM

Mousemonkey said:
I admitted to that? :??:  :lol: 

Do you have an Apple phone by any chance?

You've repeatedly stated that you've no reason to care what others have to say regarding hardware. Don't be glib -- it's unbecoming.

No, I don't own any Apple products. They're a terrible company that bleeds consumers and tries to monopolize innovation, while stealing their way to the top. /rant
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January 13, 2013 1:58:20 PM

MatildaPersson said:
I would ask the opposite; if you are going to upgrade, why not upgrade more? I don't like to stop half way down the road if I'm going to walk down it.


By that logic, shouldn't everyone just get a Cray?
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January 13, 2013 2:00:52 PM

cjl said:
By that logic, shouldn't everyone just get a Cray?

I guess we simply draw the line of acceptable performance upgrade at different places. I'm sure there's someone, somewhere, that'd tell us all to not bother unless we have quad 680's, all selectively overclocked lol.
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January 13, 2013 2:03:07 PM

cjl said:
(and in fact, I can recall having read the opposite several times - I've seen lower end SLI recommended over a single top end card, since it frequently gives a better bang for the buck).


SLI lower end cards do usually tend to have better performance per dollar ratio. However, it'll also uses more power, produce more heat and even more noise. There's also the issue of poor scaling or micro-stuttering. This things apply to current and older gen cards.
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January 13, 2013 2:04:20 PM

EzioAs said:
Don't you think this has gotten a little bit off topic? Maybe you guys could just PM each other

No.
MatildaPersson said:
You've repeatedly stated that you've no reason to care what others have to say regarding hardware. Don't be glib -- it's unbecoming.

No, I don't own any Apple products. They're a terrible company that bleeds consumers and tries to monopolize innovation, while stealing their way to the top. /rant


Who's being glib? Where is it written that my views are not my own? You have taken the stance that I must take notice of nameless persons rather than what I see with my own eyes, and somehow I'm in the wrong?
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