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First Time Build-$2000 budget

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March 5, 2013 6:42:16 AM

I'm building a PC for the first time. I've been doing some research for a while now, and I've come up with the build below. My budget is around $2000 and the computer will be used for current games on max settings and high-end gaming for as far into the future as I can. I also am trying to plan for future upgrade-ability, so I'm thinking a single GPU for now and figuring I can buy another one in the future to hook up with the other as resources allow and prices fall. Any ideas or comments would be very welcome. Thanks!

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99)

CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($32.97)

Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z77 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($239.99)

RAM: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($99.99)

Data Drive: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($99.99)

System Drive: Intel 330 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($122.41)

GPU: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($399.99)

Case: Rosewill THOR V2 ATX Full Tower Case ($121.84)

PSU: Corsair Professional Gold 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($169.99)

Disc Drive: Asus BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($79.99)

Wireless Network Adapter: Asus PCE-N53 802.11a/b/g/n PCI-Express x1

Wi-Fi Adapter ($38.99)

Moniter: Asus VK248H-CSM 24.0" Monitor ($211.99)

Total: $1897.12

I included the monitor I was thinking of as well as the wireless network card because I really have no clue where I should go in that direction, and those were just the ones that seemed to have everything I needed. Also, should I get a wired network adapter? I'm looking to use this in college so I don't know where I will be in terms of internet connectivity.

More about : time build 2000 budget

March 5, 2013 8:06:28 PM

Honestly? I think I would drop that whole build. Despite what the general consensus is on Intel - I will say I have had serious problems with their SSDs and refuse to recommend them. You don't need a case as big as the Thor, and you're way overpaying on the CPU and the motherboard. My biggest advice I can give for a build: do not plan for the future. Plan for now with the ability to change things as you go, evolving a build will ensure its' longevity. Getting hardware that will limit your ability to expand will make sure future proofing is a moot point.

I'd do some reconfiguring and go with something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($226.78 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($60.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($56.07 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($93.99 @ Adorama)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: NZXT HALE 90 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($132.72 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($18.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1694.48
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-03-05 17:02 EST-0500)

Differences:

- NZXT Phantom is a better case than the Rosewill Thor
- You don't need an 850W power supply and I included a Super Flower unit
- Better SSD included (fastest on the market currently)
- I included dual GTX 670 as opposed to a single 7970 - gets about the same frame rates as the GTX 690 for far less
- Less expensive gimmick free motherboard that isn't a heat trap
- Better CPU cooler
- You don't need the i7 for a gaming rig
March 5, 2013 8:13:23 PM

would go with this

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($226.78 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Xigmatek Dark Knight II SD1283 Night Hawk Edition 89.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($46.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD4H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($164.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($49.30 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Green 1.5TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Sandisk Ultra Plus 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($392.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($392.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1709.97
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-03-05 17:10 EST-0500)

not really a need for caviar black. picked a mobo with better quality and more power phases

not really a need for the vector series, getting a cheaper SSD makes very little difference between pricier SSDs in speed(not talking about benchmark, talking about the ability to actually see the difference)
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March 5, 2013 8:16:53 PM

boulbox said:


not really a need for caviar black. picked a mobo with better quality and more power phases

not really a need for the vector series, getting a cheaper SSD makes very little difference between pricier SSDs in speed(not talking about benchmark, talking about the ability to actually see the difference)


Green drives are ridiculously slow though. I'd much rather get a 7200 RPM drive over a 5400 RPM one.

Yeah you could make that point about SSDs - if I'm buying new hardware I want the best I can get for my money and I also want the newest hardware I can get for my money, which is why I recommend it.
March 5, 2013 8:38:25 PM

the green drive i choose runs at 7200
March 5, 2013 8:54:09 PM

boulbox said:
the green drive i choose runs at 7200


That's interesting - most green drives usually are 5400 RPM. I stand corrected there.
March 5, 2013 9:06:46 PM

Yea ^.^

only 1 of the few lol
March 5, 2013 11:23:05 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($226.98 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Phanteks PH-TC12DX_BK 68.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD4H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($164.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($49.30 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($229.89 @ Mac Mall)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($422.13 @ SuperBiiz)
Wireless Network Adapter: Rosewill RNX-N180UBE 802.11b/g/n USB 2.0 Wi-Fi Adapter ($19.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Corsair 600T Silver ATX Mid Tower Case ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VS239H-P 23.0" Monitor ($176.99 @ Best Buy)
Total: $1741.22
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
March 6, 2013 3:19:53 AM

Thanks all! G-unit1111, thanks for the advice on not planning for the future. I took the builds and kept most things. I stayed with the i7 despite the price difference because (my fault) I forgot to mention that I will be using this to run programs and edit things where the extra cores will actually make a good difference as well as running games. I went with the gigabyte motherboard because I haven't heard good things about ASrock's reliabilty. I also kept the blu-ray player as I have a bunch of media I want to be able to run. One thing I do want to ask, though, is should I go with dual 670s or 7970s?


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($314.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Xigmatek Dark Knight II SD1283 Night Hawk Edition 89.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD4H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($164.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($49.30 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Sandisk Ultra Plus 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($392.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($392.98 @ Newegg)
Wireless Network Adapter: Rosewill RNX-N180UBE 802.11b/g/n USB 2.0 Wi-Fi Adapter ($19.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: NZXT HALE 90 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($132.72 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1867.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-03-06 00:13 EST-0500)
March 6, 2013 3:49:36 AM

i7 vs i5, there is no difference in games
March 6, 2013 4:07:34 PM

boulbox said:
i7 vs i5, there is no difference in games


Wrong on both counts. First of all the poster stated he is doing other applications that require the extra threads.

Second, we are now entering the time that the extra threads are needed. Crysis 3 requires massive computing resources beyond just the GPU and does use more than 4 cores.
March 6, 2013 7:44:31 PM

babernet_1 said:
Wrong on both counts. First of all the poster stated he is doing other applications that require the extra threads.

Second, we are now entering the time that the extra threads are needed. Crysis 3 requires massive computing resources beyond just the GPU and does use more than 4 cores.


please show me the benchies i5 3570k vs i7 3770k on crysis 3 then.

I know that he is going to do some applications that the i7 would help in but i5 is still pretty good at it.

So if he is not doing like hardcore editing the i5 will be much better for the price
March 6, 2013 10:38:04 PM

boulbox said:
please show me the benchies i5 3570k vs i7 3770k on crysis 3 then.

I know that he is going to do some applications that the i7 would help in but i5 is still pretty good at it.

So if he is not doing like hardcore editing the i5 will be much better for the price

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/crysis-3-performanc...

Read and weep. The days of the I5-3570K are over.



March 6, 2013 11:32:49 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Um, the 3570K isn't on that list. If it were it would probably be slightly ahead of the FX-8350 but definitely below the 3970X.


neither is the i7 3770k.

Fail troll is failing....(not you g-unit)
March 6, 2013 11:35:31 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Um, the 3570K isn't on that list. If it were it would probably be slightly ahead of the FX-8350 but definitely below the 3970X.

No, but if you read the text, Crysis 3 uses all the processor cores, hence the 3960 is 28% faster than the 3550 even though the clocks are the same and the turbo clocks are only 5% different.
March 6, 2013 11:39:42 PM

Hi, but the i7-3770k has only four cores, the same as the i5-3570k, it does seem to take advantage of the cores, but not the hyper threading, because the i3 suffers a lot and trails behind even with amd quad core cpus ;) 
March 6, 2013 11:46:39 PM

babernet_1 said:
No, but if you read the text, Crysis 3 uses all the processor cores, hence the 3960 is 28% faster than the 3550 even though the clocks are the same and the turbo clocks are only 5% different.


you are comparing 2 CPUs in a different category.

And i said i5 3570k vs i7 3770k not a $200 CPU vs a $400 one
March 7, 2013 12:09:50 AM

boulbox said:
you are comparing 2 CPUs in a different category.

And i said i5 3570k vs i7 3770k not a $200 CPU vs a $400 one

Okay, I read up on hyper threading to make sure I understood it. Yes, we are not sure that Crysis 3 uses hyperthreads. Yes, hyperthreads only give you about 30% gain in speed, despite appearing as a doubling of cores. This is nothing to sneeze at, if a program uses hyperthreading, it would be like taking a 3770K and overclocking it again from 4.5GHz to 5.85GHz.

Looking at the data, we cannot clearly see how the 3960 was 30% faster, could be the extra cores, could be the larger cache etc.

But the text does say more cores are used in Crysis 3. I guess we'll have to wait to see if it uses hyperthreads.

That being said, the Haswell has several insructions allowing easier multi-core programming, so we can look for an accelerated shift in software to multi-core/hyperthreading into the future. This is why I plan on getting an I7-4770K this June.
March 7, 2013 12:15:41 AM

babernet_1 said:
Okay, I read up on hyper threading to make sure I understood it. Yes, we are not sure that Crysis 3 uses hyperthreads. Yes, hyperthreads only give you about 30% gain in speed, despite appearing as a doubling of cores. This is nothing to sneeze at, if a program uses hyperthreading, it would be like taking a 3770K and overclocking it again from 4.5GHz to 5.85GHz.

Looking at the data, we cannot clearly see how the 3960 was 30% faster, could be the extra cores, could be the larger cache etc.

But the text does say more cores are used in Crysis 3. I guess we'll have to wait to see if it uses hyperthreads.

That being said, the Haswell has several insructions allowing easier multi-core programming, so we can look for an accelerated shift in software to multi-core/hyperthreading into the future. This is why I plan on getting an I7-4770K this June.


same amount of cores same amount of threads as a i7. Not going to jump on the bandwagon for haswell as i believe that it is not going to believe all that different froma i7 3770k
March 7, 2013 12:29:39 AM

Well, seeing how I have a Core 2 Quad from the early 50's I think, I am more than overdue for a new computer. The Haswell has lots of power saving features for even when the processor is running full steam. Add to that it is rated at a larger power then the Ivy Bridge, I think we have an overclocking champ in the works.
March 7, 2013 5:56:23 AM

how about we help the man out with his build :p 
March 7, 2013 6:36:05 PM

babernet_1 said:
Well, seeing how I have a Core 2 Quad from the early 50's I think, I am more than overdue for a new computer. The Haswell has lots of power saving features for even when the processor is running full steam. Add to that it is rated at a larger power then the Ivy Bridge, I think we have an overclocking champ in the works.


IB OCs pretty good actually, just need to do the IHS mod because they used cement as the paste.

Also the other reason why i am(and a few others) are not going with haswell is because it might be a CPU+mobo or something of that sort where you stick with intels board
March 7, 2013 6:49:06 PM

boulbox said:
IB OCs pretty good actually, just need to do the IHS mod because they used cement as the paste.

Also the other reason why i am(and a few others) are not going with haswell is because it might be a CPU+mobo or something of that sort where you stick with intels board


Not sure where you heard that. There is a new chip standard, Z87, and manufacturers are building them. They are making special BGA (Ball Grid Array) packages for notebooks and similar computers that are soldiered in place. (At work we have a socket for BGA's, costs several hundred dollars) But the Haswell will be available in the normal LGA (Land Grid Array) though 1150 pins, rather than 1155.
March 7, 2013 7:51:49 PM

If was paying $2000 build i would get Crossfire 7970's because 1 card won't be that future proof.
!