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Windows 7 and Formatting

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  • Windows 7
  • Formatting
  • Format
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows 7
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January 31, 2010 4:36:11 PM

First time Windows 7 user here. I have to ask this because it's bothering me. I've been on xp so I'm behind the times.

Why when i install Windows 7 and format a disk does it format in less than 10 seconds? Is it actually formatting the disk? I am using a SSD drive now but still 10 seconds doesn't seem like enough time to format.

I'm thinking of using my windows xp bootup to format the disk lol. Can someone enlighten on me why this format is so quick?

Thanks,

Windows 7 Newb

More about : windows formatting

a c 426 $ Windows 7
January 31, 2010 4:52:33 PM

its a quick format , if you do a regular or low level format that would take a half hour or so!
the quick does the job!
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January 31, 2010 8:37:09 PM

I've never understood what the actual difference is between a quick format and a full format. Is there any performance increase from the disk with a full format?
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January 31, 2010 9:01:58 PM

Not really any performance difference.

I quick explanation is the quick format only erases the Master Boot file which basically holds the location of the files on the drive. Without this file the PC doesn't know there are still files on the HD. When installing the OS, the file is rewritten and the OS is installed in the same way as with a full format.

a full format writes zeros throughout the entire drive and isn't really required unless you want to erase files for security purposes.... and multiple formats is required to destroy any evidence of past files
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a c 215 $ Windows 7
January 31, 2010 10:21:17 PM

bc4 said:
Not really any performance difference.

I quick explanation is the quick format only erases the Master Boot file which basically holds the location of the files on the drive. Without this file the PC doesn't know there are still files on the HD. When installing the OS, the file is rewritten and the OS is installed in the same way as with a full format.

a full format writes zeros throughout the entire drive and isn't really required unless you want to erase files for security purposes.... and multiple formats is required to destroy any evidence of past files


Actually that's not entirely correct. A full format overwrites the MBR and then reads every other sector on the drive, flagging any as bad that cannot be read so the drive does not use them. It does not write zeroes to every sector. Data recovery on a formatted volume would be much more difficult if that were the case.

Basically, full format = quick format + chkdsk
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