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Basic connector question

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Anonymous
June 4, 2004 5:57:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I don;t know what I'm doing here - so asking the experts.

I have a very old reel to reel tape recorder with twin cable output
joined to a circular 5-pin connector (XLR?). I need to connect to an
RCA type input. Can I just cut off the old connector and replace with
2 RCA jacks, or if not - what to do?

Thanks in advance for your help.
Anonymous
June 4, 2004 11:27:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"atticus" wrote ...
> I don;t know what I'm doing here - so asking the experts.
>
> I have a very old reel to reel tape recorder with twin cable output
> joined to a circular 5-pin connector (XLR?). I need to connect to an
> RCA type input. Can I just cut off the old connector and replace with
> 2 RCA jacks, or if not - what to do?

European equipment of a certain vintage used 5-pin DIN
connectors for line in and out. Adapter cables (with RCA
at the other end) are available. For example...
http://store.a2zcable.com/audio-audio-adapters-5-pin-di...
Anonymous
June 5, 2004 8:43:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

> I have a very old reel to reel tape recorder with twin cable output
> joined to a circular 5-pin connector (XLR?). I need to connect to an
> RCA type input. Can I just cut off the old connector and replace with
> 2 RCA jacks, or if not - what to do?

Yes, you could do that.

Lee Salter
Related resources
Anonymous
June 5, 2004 5:44:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On 4 Jun 2004 01:57:51 -0700, google@maxihost.com (atticus) wrote:

>I don;t know what I'm doing here - so asking the experts.
>
>I have a very old reel to reel tape recorder with twin cable output
>joined to a circular 5-pin connector (XLR?). I need to connect to an
>RCA type input. Can I just cut off the old connector and replace with
>2 RCA jacks, or if not - what to do?
>
>Thanks in advance for your help.

Doubtless a DIN connector. The electrical characteristics were
actually different to the Line In and Line Out normally found on RCA
connections. But today's amplifiers are very forgiving. Try a
direct connection as you suggest.

Pin 3 (top) is common ground. The remaining 4 pins may be a
combination of inputs and outputs. Here in the UK a 5-DIN to 4-phono
cable is easily obtainable. Maybe also wherever you are?

If your tape recorder has two DIN ports, I'd expect one to be in/out
to amplifier, the other to be a microphone input.
Anonymous
June 5, 2004 8:18:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Laurence Payne wrote:

>Doubtless a DIN connector.

I agree.

> The electrical characteristics were
>actually different to the Line In and Line Out normally found on RCA
>connections.

How so?

--
========================================================================
Michael Kesti | "And like, one and one don't make
| two, one and one make one."
mkesti@gv.net | - The Who, Bargain
Anonymous
June 5, 2004 10:09:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Michael R. Kesti" <mkesti@gv.net> wrote in message
news:40C254C0.56C15E68@gv.net...
> Laurence Payne wrote:
>
> >Doubtless a DIN connector.
>
> I agree.
>
> > The electrical characteristics were
> >actually different to the Line In and Line Out normally found on RCA
> >connections.
>
> How so?

IIRC, they had significantly higher output impedance, and
lower input impedance than modern consumer line-level.
They may also have had a different definition of "line-level".
!