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IDE or AHCI for SSD's

Last response: in Windows 7
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March 19, 2012 6:01:30 PM

Good day all,

So I was finally able to install Windows XP SP2 - 32 Bit on my small 64 Gig SSD, after I kept getting ***Stop: 0x0000007B messages.

I changed AHCI to IDE in the bios and it went ahead & installed & works well. That was the only way it seemed to work.

My continued plan is to now add a bigger 128 Gig SSD, and install Windows 7 - 64 Bit on it, but my understanding is that I need to set IDE back to AHCI before hand.

But when I did, Windows XP would not start, and kept going around in circles ending up at the 'Start Windows Normally' & 'Last Good Configuration' page. :non: 

I do also have a standard 1 TB Western Digital HDD drive with Windows 7 - 64 Bit installed on it, but have left this drive disconnected for now.

Would I need to connect & operate from that 1 TB HDD drive in order to set IDE to AHCI, and go ahead with my 128 Gig SSD Win 7 install?

Also, does that mean that I have to manually change the BIOS from AHCI back to IDE whenever I want to use the smaller 64 Gig SSD with Win XP on it?


Thanks,

Jim

More about : ide ahci ssd

a b $ Windows 7
March 19, 2012 6:16:17 PM

You need to set the BIOS to AHCI mode before any installations. After that all drives should be running in AHCI mode. So as long as all the drives are in AHCI mode you should have no problems.
I did have a mobo that always had a hard time with AHCI, so when it fried I was happy to move to a newer board and I have had no AHCI issues since. It was an older Biostar 790GX motherboard. Its a BIOS setting so it should be OS independent, but I haven't worked with XP in years.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 19, 2012 6:18:32 PM

Mixed or auto settings can have adverse effects too, so as long as you're doing fresh installs in ahci mode it should be ok.
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March 19, 2012 6:31:02 PM

But I was not able to install XP other than in IDE mode.

So I'm not sure what the work around is.
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March 19, 2012 6:44:46 PM

The work around is to stay clear of XP :p 

You'll need a driver disk to use at blue screen install phase and use the F key to load the driver manually for XP to recognize the controller & disks.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 19, 2012 6:47:24 PM

jimusic said:
But I was not able to install XP other than in IDE mode.

So I'm not sure what the work around is.


OK, just keep this message posted here. There is I believe a registry workaround for XP, I don't have a link to it currently but I've seen it before. Also try googling it and maybe other forums as well. The answer is out there, I'm hoping one of my Toms cohorts will have the answer for you.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 19, 2012 6:49:23 PM

dechy said:
The work around is to stay clear of XP :p 

You'll need a driver disk to use at blue screen install phase and use the F key to load the driver manually for XP to recognize the controller & disks.



HAHA yeah I was going to suggest get rid of XP. I would def try the F6 drivers, although it should not be necessary with the Z68. Worth a try though.
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March 19, 2012 6:49:43 PM

You need to provide the AHCI drivers to the XP install the same way you owuld with RAID drivers. XP does not know how to handle AHCI as it predates it.

As an example for our HP notebooks I would download hte AHCI driver for the chipset off HP's support page, I would assume that the mobo vendor's would provide this in your case, if not Intel might (or AMD if it is an AMD mobo).
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March 19, 2012 7:01:18 PM

Would this be it from the ASUS site?

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z6...

Chipset (1)

Version 9.2.0.1021

Description: Intel Chipset Inf Update Program V9.2.0.1021 for Windows 32/64bit XP & 32/64bit Vista& 32/64bit 7--(WHQL).

File Size
6,23 (MBytes) 2011.03.04 update

Download from:
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March 19, 2012 8:03:33 PM

jimusic said:
Would this be it from the ASUS site?

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z6...

Chipset (1)

Version 9.2.0.1021

Description: Intel Chipset Inf Update Program V9.2.0.1021 for Windows 32/64bit XP & 32/64bit Vista& 32/64bit 7--(WHQL).

File Size
6,23 (MBytes) 2011.03.04 update

Download from:

No. You need the Intel Matrix Storage Controller Driver. It is a relatively simple procedure to install Windows XP with a SATA drive in AHCI mode if you can get your hands on a floppy drive and disk. I have found it much easier to use 3.5" floppies than trying to make it work with a USB flash drive or CD/DVD. The XP install process will recognise the floppy whereas you have to take some additional steps to make it work with other options.

If you want to leave your 64GB SSD as it is until you get a larger SSD and install Windows 7 on it, then just leave the BIOS setting in IDE mode for now. Once you get the new SSD, disconnect your 64 GB drive, then connect the 128 GB drive, change the BIOS setting to AHCI and install Windows 7.

If you want to reinstall Windows XP with your SATA connections set to AHCI mode in BIOS, take the following steps:

Check check your current storage controller in Windows device manager (type devmgmt.msc in a run dialog box). It should look something like "Intel storage controller ICH9M/ME" Write this down.
Download the Intel(R) Rapid Storage Technology driver version 10.6.2 (in the SATA sub-menu) to another computer.
Unpack/Unzip the installation files.
If you leave the standard folder name, then navigate through the following sub folders: IRST_V10621001_XPVistaWin7\Driver\Disk\32bit
Copy all the files in that folder to the root of a blank floppy drive.
Boot to your Windows XP install disk (with the Floppy drive already connected if it is an external, USB floppy drive).
On the first blue "loading setup files" screen, you should see a "Press F6 to load SCSI Drivers" message flash in grey bar at the bottom. Press F6
Setup should finish loading and tell you that it was unable to find any disks available to install Windows. It should give you the option now to tell it where to look for drivers to help it find a disk (I believe the key is 'S'). Press the appropriate key.
If you had the floppy drive connected then it will tell you to insert the drivers disk and press enter.
You should get a small box displaying a list of about 4 driver options. You can scroll up or down with the arrow keys to view more. Locate the one that most closely resembles the storage controller name you wrote down earlier and contains AHCI. Do not choose the RAID option. The number and suffix in the driver should match (if you wrote down ICH9M/ME then you should see something that matches that).
Highlight that option and press enter. Windows setup will load your ACHI Drivers and return to the "Press 'x' to add drivers" screen, but the screen should now list the driver that you had it load.
Press enter (Leave the floppy drive connected and disk in) and you should be able to proceed normally through the rest of the installation.

If the installation gives you a "No available hard disk drives found" error message then you selected the wrong driver to load. Reboot to the Windows XP setup disk and run through the process again, choosing a different driver this time.
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March 19, 2012 8:10:10 PM

Why you would ever want to use XP on a SSD is beyond my understanding since windows xp doesn't support TRIM which means your SSD will brick itself in months instead of years since there's no garbage control.
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March 19, 2012 8:32:52 PM

Isaiah4110 - Hey thanks for the long post answer. Great Verse that 41 10 btw.



mightymaxio - So am I just wasting my time with XP on the SSD then?

I don't plan to use it for anything but a few programs, but no storage on it, as I have other drives for that.

Would it be better to put it on my Western Digital 1 TB HDD?
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March 19, 2012 8:55:58 PM

Not exactly... look under something like disk controller drives, anything that mentions AHCI is going to be the one.
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March 19, 2012 9:05:03 PM

I would install at least Vista if you own that, if you own 7 put that instead on there. Your pretty much wasting time trying to get XP to play nice with the drive and the fact that there's no TRIM either really sucks.
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March 19, 2012 9:36:37 PM

mightymaxio said:
I would install at least Vista if you own that, if you own 7 put that instead on there. Your pretty much wasting time trying to get XP to play nice with the drive and the fact that there's no TRIM either really sucks.

I do own Win 7 - 64 Bit Home Premium.

I guess I wanted to have a 32 Bit OS for some of my older stuff that doesn't run on Win 7.

I see the option to upgrade & use XP Mode, but it sounds like this could just lead to more hassles as well.
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March 19, 2012 9:38:09 PM

What i would do personally is install windows 7 and then use a Virtual Machine of Windows xp with graphics support and then you'll be able to run about 90% of all programs made for XP.
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March 19, 2012 10:09:00 PM

mightymaxio said:
What i would do personally is install windows 7 and then use a Virtual Machine of Windows xp with graphics support and then you'll be able to run about 90% of all programs made for XP.

That sounds like a good idea. I'll have to look into that.

Any links handy there?
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March 19, 2012 10:21:00 PM

mightymaxio said:
You could use the one Microsoft provides: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/

Or you could try VMWare, VM Player or any others you find.

Hey, thanks mightymaxio.

Have you tried this yourself or have any results in doing this?
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Best solution

March 19, 2012 10:39:01 PM

jimusic said:
Isaiah4110 - Hey thanks for the long post answer. Great Verse that 41 10 btw.



mightymaxio - So am I just wasting my time with XP on the SSD then?

I don't plan to use it for anything but a few programs, but no storage on it, as I have other drives for that.

Would it be better to put it on my Western Digital 1 TB HDD?

Thanks jimusic. It is definitely a good one.

mightymaxio brought up a very good point regarding Windows XP and TRIM support.

As an easier option to setting up a virtual PC: Have you tried running any of your older programs on Windows 7 to see if they work or not yet? It seems to me like Microsoft has gotten a lot better with their "Run in compatibility mode for Windows __" option with Windows 7. I have even seen ancient drivers on "Built for windows XP" PC Models successfully install on Windows 7 by simply selecting that option.

Having the 64-bit version does throw another curve in the mix, but in my experience most standard software will still run if you use compatibility mode. If you haven't already then I would give that a try first since it could save time and hassle. Keep in mind that the installer failing to load might just mean that you need to run the setup.exe file in compatibility mode to get it to install.

If that fails then I would definitely give a virtual PC a try. I haven't ever had the need to set one up myself, but I know they can be useful and work well.
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March 19, 2012 11:13:42 PM

Isaiah4110 said:
Thanks jimusic. It is definitely a good one.

mightymaxio brought up a very good point regarding Windows XP and TRIM support.

As an easier option to setting up a virtual PC: Have you tried running any of your older programs on Windows 7 to see if they work or not yet?

I have tried, but not in Compatibility Mode.

I should try that again.
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March 19, 2012 11:17:46 PM

I have good results with VM's and XP as long as its not super graphically intensive it will work fine.
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March 20, 2012 4:18:25 AM

mightymaxio said:
I have good results with VM's and XP as long as its not super graphically intensive it will work fine.

No my programs are not graphically intense at all.

Just music recording and playback screens and their various plugin interface windows, which are mostly static.
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March 20, 2012 1:17:46 PM

Then it should work with no problems, i would still try to get them working under windows 7 before the VM though since it might save you about 30-50 minutes of time to get the VM setup.
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March 20, 2012 1:27:55 PM

Dont worry about it. Have run SSDs with IDE and AHCI (when the MB doesn't have AHCI) and the difference in performance is minimal to none.

Hot plugging is the best feature of AHCI.
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March 20, 2012 6:05:33 PM

daglesj said:
Dont worry about it. Have run SSDs with IDE and AHCI (when the MB doesn't have AHCI) and the difference in performance is minimal to none.

Hot plugging is the best feature of AHCI.

So it seems to matter very little, which was kind of the impression I got?
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March 30, 2012 1:07:18 AM

Best answer selected by jimusic.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 30, 2012 6:01:16 AM

This topic has been closed by Nikorr
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