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Music CD-R blanks

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Anonymous
July 2, 2004 10:05:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I've been reading about music CD-R blanks and their purpose(legal
immunity from copyright issues) but I have one question that never
seems to be answered. Can these music CD-Rs be used in regular home
burners and if so, can data be recorded on them? Thank you.

More about : music blanks

Anonymous
July 2, 2004 10:13:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Nick Wesh" wrote ...
> I've been reading about music CD-R blanks and their
> purpose (legal immunity from copyright issues)

Huh? Since when did using music CDr blanks provide
"immunity from copyright issues"? Can you provide a
reference for this remarkable statement?

> but I have one question that never seems to be answered.
> Can these music CD-Rs be used in regular home
> burners and if so, can data be recorded on them? Thank you.

I think so, but since they cost more, most people don't do it.
Anonymous
July 2, 2004 1:43:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Nick Wesh" <nick500@flashmail.com> wrote in message
news:15fd5bac.0407020505.6499af60@posting.google.com
> I've been reading about music CD-R blanks and their purpose(legal
> immunity from copyright issues) but I have one question that never
> seems to be answered. Can these music CD-Rs be used in regular home
> burners and if so, can data be recorded on them? Thank you.

Yes and yes. Been there, done that but only in a pinch because of the extra
cost.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 2, 2004 11:02:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <10eans0ngukfbfd@corp.supernews.com>,
Richard Crowley <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote:

>"Nick Wesh" wrote ...
>> I've been reading about music CD-R blanks and their
>> purpose (legal immunity from copyright issues)
>
>Huh? Since when did using music CDr blanks provide
>"immunity from copyright issues"? Can you provide a
>reference for this remarkable statement?

Google for "Audio Home Recording Act".

Briefly: if you use the "consumer digital audio" recording media
(which have had a royalty added into their wholesale price), in a
"consumer digital audio recorder" (one which enforces SCMS, and which
will record _only_ on the royalty-paid media, and which has also had a
royalty added into its wholesale price), and you make a copy of a
copyrighted musical work, and if this copy is made in a noncommercial
context (i.e. if you give it away to a friend), then you are immune to
either criminal or civil prosecution for copyright violation. The
inclusion of the royalties in the disc and burner prices, and the
enforcement of "only one generation of digital copying", is deemed to
be an acceptable tradeoff by The Powers That Be.

If you violate _any_ of these conditions (i.e. use a generic
computer-type data disc, or burn the disc in a computer CD-RW drive,
or do the copying in a commercial fashion), then the limited immunity
does not apply, and The Men In Black may be knockin' on your door.

>I think so, but since they cost more, most people don't do it.

There's no technical reason why they won't work for data.

The main technical difference between the two types of disc is based
on the ATIP information ("absolute time in pregroove") - some
administrative information which is physically molded into the disc in
an interesting way. The ATIP data tells the recorder how much
recording time is available on the disc, the ID of the manufacturer,
some information about the disc's recording characteristics, and the
disc's data type. The latter is "restricted use, general purpose" for
a computer data disc, and "unrestricted use" for a royalty-paid
consumer-audio disc.

Also, the consumer-audio discs often use a dye which is optimized for
burning at low speed (1x or 2x) as these discs are often burned in
real-time. Generic data discs these days are usually dye-optimized
for a high-speed burn.

--
Dave Platt <dplatt@radagast.org> AE6EO
Hosting the Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!
Anonymous
July 3, 2004 12:50:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Dave Platt" wrote ...
> Briefly: if you use the "consumer digital audio" recording media
> (which have had a royalty added into their wholesale price), in a
> "consumer digital audio recorder" (one which enforces SCMS, and which
> will record _only_ on the royalty-paid media, and which has also had a
> royalty added into its wholesale price), and you make a copy of a
> copyrighted musical work, and if this copy is made in a noncommercial
> context (i.e. if you give it away to a friend), then you are immune to
> either criminal or civil prosecution for copyright violation. The
> inclusion of the royalties in the disc and burner prices, and the
> enforcement of "only one generation of digital copying", is deemed to
> be an acceptable tradeoff by The Powers That Be.

OK. Then explain how the AHRA worked in the decades before
music CD-R's existed?
Anonymous
July 3, 2004 4:29:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On 2 Jul 2004 06:05:23 -0700, nick500@flashmail.com (Nick Wesh) wrote:

>I've been reading about music CD-R blanks and their purpose(legal
>immunity from copyright issues) but I have one question that never
>seems to be answered. Can these music CD-Rs be used in regular home
>burners and if so, can data be recorded on them? Thank you.

Yes. Yes.
Anonymous
July 3, 2004 8:01:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <10ecb7epv6u716c@corp.supernews.com>,
Richard Crowley <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote:

>> Briefly: if you use the "consumer digital audio" recording media
>> (which have had a royalty added into their wholesale price), in a
>> "consumer digital audio recorder" (one which enforces SCMS, and which
>> will record _only_ on the royalty-paid media, and which has also had a
>> royalty added into its wholesale price), and you make a copy of a
>> copyrighted musical work, and if this copy is made in a noncommercial
>> context (i.e. if you give it away to a friend), then you are immune to
>> either criminal or civil prosecution for copyright violation. The
>> inclusion of the royalties in the disc and burner prices, and the
>> enforcement of "only one generation of digital copying", is deemed to
>> be an acceptable tradeoff by The Powers That Be.
>
>OK. Then explain how the AHRA worked in the decades before
>music CD-R's existed?

It didn't. The Audio Home Recording Act was passed by Congress in
1992, amending the Copyright Act of 1976. It was the AHRA which
created the legal requirement that music CD-R discs be created. Prior
to the passage of the Audio Home Recording Act of 1992, there simply
was no legal concept of a "consumer digital audio recorder" (or
"media"). The AHRA created this definition.

Before the Act was passed into law, there was a bunch of uncertainty
as to what sorts of home copying of music were legitimate and what
were not. Home-recording advocates held out for a broad definition of
"fair use", while some parties in the music industry were asserting
that all home copying was illegal.

The AHRA specifically legitimizes non-commercial _analog_ copying of
music (no royalties are required), and legitimizes non-commercial
_digital_ copying (with restrictions) in return for the mandated
royalty payments, and a prohibition against making/selling/importing
consumer-audio digital recorders which don't implement SCMS.

I don't know how long it was between the time that the AHRA was
passed, and the time that the first AHRA-compliant recorders and
"music CD-Rs" appeared on the market. I suspect it wasn't too long,
as the Act had been in negotiation between the various industry
parties for quite some time prior to its passage. It certainly wasn't
"decades".

--
Dave Platt <dplatt@radagast.org> AE6EO
Hosting the Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!
!