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Graphics card died/Installing new one, need help!

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January 29, 2013 1:37:29 AM

Noob here needing help with new video card.

Not completely sure of all my specs but:
Intel Core 2 Quad on Asus Republic of Gamers MoBo
16GB RAM
250GB HD
Nvidea GeForce 9800GT 1GB DDR3/ XFX - AMD Radeon HD 7750 2GB DDR3

This was a custom build that I purchased used. I've done 0 modifications.

Today I came home and fired up my machine to do some gaming and kept having an issue of losing video signal. I know that the game did not crash because the audio continued, but I couldn't retrieve my video signal. Powering down the monitor or reconnecting my VGA cable did nothing. A second monitor provided the same results. Upon resetting the computer I could get the signal back but shortly after the game started, same thing all over again. Finally, before I could get the game started for about the 3rd time, it lost signal while on the desktop. This time the signal could not be retrieved again.
So next I open the side (remember, noob here) and noticed that the fan on my Nvidea GeForce 9800GT is not running at all. My thought is a dead card. The game in question GTA IV which I run on pretty low settings for better fps. I know GTA IV can be strenuous on even the best machines but I dont think I was really pushing any limits.
So I go purchase the second card listed, the AMD Radeon HD 7750, and begin to install it. First, I know I do not have an on board GPU so installing the drivers via the included CD are not possible. I tried to install anyway hoping that my computer would recognize the card and display something. No luck. I still have no video. I tried removing the mobo battery and clearing the CMOS via the convenient "Clear CMOS" button on the mobo. Still no signal.

At this point I need a suggestion from one of you awesome IT guys on this site. Please help as my withdrawal symptons are increasing by the second!
Also, is the new AMD Radeon HD 7750 an equivalent/better/worse choice to go to from my old Nvidea GeForce 9800GT?
January 29, 2013 1:52:24 AM

In order to pin point the problem you may need to do a bit of investigative work. Please list full specs on your computer including version of windows, motherboard, and power supply. Also is your system plugged into a surge protector and by chance if you smell the fan of your 9800GT do you detect any faint burnt smell. Your issue could be one of several problems and this would help narrow down the specific problem
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January 29, 2013 2:08:14 AM

I think this would be your PSU though
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January 29, 2013 2:13:58 AM

Not completely sure of all my specs but:

Windows 7 64bit
Intel Core 2 Quad (Not sure of the GHz)
Mobo Asus Maximus Republic of Gamers (that's everything I know about it)
4x4GB RAM
250GB HD
PSU: Corsair HX550W
Nvidea GeForce 9800GT 1GB DDR3/ XFX - AMD Radeon HD 7750 2GB DDR3

This was a custom build that I purchased used. I've done 0 modifications.

No surge protector and smell was the first thing I did but there is none.

I should also mention that the Nvidea did require an extra connection from the PSU wheras the AMD gets all it's power straight from the PCI.
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January 29, 2013 2:16:06 AM

Since your old card crashed out it's likely that it did, in fact, bite the dust. Your new card is roughly equivalent to your old card and, as far as I know, has even less demand on your PSU - although the above poster could be correct. Check the power requirements on your new card and let us know what the specs on your PSU are. As a personal suggestion, if it's at all possible, I would suggest returning the card (tell them it doesn't display anything on your monitor either and that you aren't sure if it's the card or your PSU and they should take it back. Most places will, anyway) and saving up for an upgrade and a new PSU. It will be worth it.
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January 29, 2013 2:22:31 AM

Huckx said:
Since your old card crashed out it's likely that it did, in fact, bite the dust. Your new card is roughly equivalent to your old card and, as far as I know, has even less demand on your PSU - although the above poster could be correct. Check the power requirements on your new card and let us know what the specs on your PSU are. As a personal suggestion, if it's at all possible, I would suggest returning the card (tell them it doesn't display anything on your monitor either and that you aren't sure if it's the card or your PSU and they should take it back. Most places will, anyway) and saving up for an upgrade and a new PSU. It will be worth it.


I think you might be correct. The AMD GPU requires 500W, so my 550W is just not up to the task. The Nvidea requires 350W.
Given the limited information I can provide on my system, what's a good PSU & GPU for a moderate gamer like myself?
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a b U Graphics card
January 29, 2013 2:35:53 AM

Reinstall os
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January 29, 2013 2:37:10 AM

I like Corsair PSUs myself. Go with a 600w+ TX or GS series. They are both getting good reviews, and I know several people who swear by them. They also operate on only one 12v rail, making whatever demands your GPU might have easily understood in relation to the PSU. I'm upgrading to a GTX 680 myself, but that's a very high end card and requires a bit of juice. The 560ti still looks great in even brand new games. On Guild Wars 2, which has the best graphics of any MMO out that I know of, the 560 runs smooth as ever on full settings. That's paired with a 600W Corsair GS. You could go lower, based on your personal rqmts/preferences, but my personal philosophy is if you're going to spend the time and cash to put together a rig you're proud of, you might as well get hardware that will last you through a few evolutions in gaming tech. In the long run, going with the middle ground can end up being more costly than saving for something pushing top tiers
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January 29, 2013 2:40:14 AM

Look into getting a new processor too. You don't want to put a Turbo Charger on a Geo-Metro, if you catch my drift. Stay Intel to avoid having to reinstall your OS, and because Intel is superior at the moment. I5s are wrecking 8150 8 core AMDs at the moment. Not to mention the I7...
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January 29, 2013 2:46:57 AM

Huckx said:
Look into getting a new processor too. You don't want to put a Turbo Charger on a Geo-Metro, if you catch my drift. Stay Intel to avoid having to reinstall your OS, and because Intel is superior at the moment. I5s are wrecking 8150 8 core AMDs at the moment. Not to mention the I7...


I am kind of on a budget but a new PSU, GPU, & CPU? Should I just build a complete new tower?
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January 29, 2013 2:52:03 AM

devilchuk17 said:
Not completely sure of all my specs but:

Windows 7 64bit
Intel Core 2 Quad (Not sure of the GHz)
Mobo Asus Maximus Republic of Gamers (that's everything I know about it)
4x4GB RAM
250GB HD
PSU: Corsair HX550W
Nvidea GeForce 9800GT 1GB DDR3/ XFX - AMD Radeon HD 7750 2GB DDR3

This was a custom build that I purchased used. I've done 0 modifications.

No surge protector and smell was the first thing I did but there is none.

I should also mention that the Nvidea did require an extra connection from the PSU wheras the AMD gets all it's power straight from the PCI.


Most people think it has something to do with your PSU. Although this is possible I do not think it is the most likely situation. hytecgowtham suggested you plug the graphics card into the other slot on the MB. This is a great idea. Although your old card required another power connection the new card gets all its power from the board. Assuming the PSU is still capable of delivering full power to the board it should not be the problem. The amount of power delivered through the pci-e connection is capped at 75 watts. My guess is if the PSU was no longer able to deliver that power to the mb you would have seen numerous other errors from the system including CPU.
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January 29, 2013 2:56:28 AM

BriboCN said:
Most people think it has something to do with your PSU. Although this is possible I do not think it is the most likely situation. hytecgowtham suggested you plug the graphics card into the other slot on the MB. This is a great idea. Although your old card required another power connection the new card gets all its power from the board. Assuming the PSU is still capable of delivering full power to the board it should not be the problem. The amount of power delivered through the pci-e connection is capped at 75 watts. My guess is if the PSU was no longer able to deliver that power to the mb you would have seen numerous other errors from the system including CPU.


I did the other PCI but I only got the same result. Nothing.
From reading in another post: Could it be that I am installing an AMD card with Nvidea drivers installed?
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January 29, 2013 3:09:12 AM

devilchuk17 said:
I think you might be correct. The AMD GPU requires 500W, so my 550W is just not up to the task. The Nvidea requires 350W.
Given the limited information I can provide on my system, what's a good PSU & GPU for a moderate gamer like myself?


Raw power draw isn't your problem. The 7750, by definition, draws less power than your 9800GT, because the 7750 only requires power from the PCIe slot on your motherboard. If your PSU was capable of providing ample power to the 9800 GT, it should be more than capable of providing ample power for the 7750.

That said, it is possible that your PSU is bad, and/or that somehow you blew out the PCIe slot, which would explain why your 9800GT's fan stopped spinning (whereas, I'm assuming, everything else continued to function normally). In my experience, when a video card dies, it usually misbehaves in more colorful ways before it simply stops sending a signal -- artifacts on the screen, driver errors and whatnot. So it makes sense to me that for whatever reason the GPU's power was cut.

So the long and the short of all of that rambling is that your motherboard or your PSU sounds like the culprit (or both; if the PSU went squirrely it might have broken the motherboard). You've tried a different graphics card so that doesn't appear to be the problem.

I know that's not what you want to hear, but it's the best I can think to say. Sorry to hear about your troubles.
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a b U Graphics card
January 29, 2013 3:10:00 AM

Insert only one gpu amd or nvidia .
goto safe mode after getting display . uninstall gpu driver's .
restart . normal mode. install gpu driver's provided in cd. update os .
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a b U Graphics card
January 29, 2013 3:10:06 AM

If u insert old gpu no problem . update bios if u insert new gpu.
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January 29, 2013 3:11:38 AM

devilchuk17 said:
I did the other PCI but I only got the same result. Nothing.
From reading in another post: Could it be that I am installing an AMD card with Nvidea drivers installed?


The drivers shouldn't prevent the computer from displaying its boot sequence; the boot sequence occurs before the drivers are even loaded (in the OS).

(And obviously, reinstalling drivers and/or Windows ain't feasible if you have a blank screen. :(  )

This is a hardware problem.
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January 29, 2013 4:51:02 AM

hytecgowthaman said:
Insert only one gpu amd or nvidia .
goto safe mode after getting display . uninstall gpu driver's .
restart . normal mode. install gpu driver's provided in cd. update os .


In windows 7 the system should at least boot in minimal resolution even if the wrong drivers are installed. I do not think that is the issue
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January 29, 2013 4:56:55 AM

Fulgurant said:
The drivers shouldn't prevent the computer from displaying its boot sequence; the boot sequence occurs before the drivers are even loaded (in the OS).

(And obviously, reinstalling drivers and/or Windows ain't feasible if you have a blank screen. :(  )

This is a hardware problem.


Exactly, and lets review, he switched video cards, so that isn't the problem. He changed MB slots so is is unlikely that is the issue

We are left with the PSU as a culprit not delivering enough power to the main board based on all the info provided. Without you having the equipment to test the power transferred from the psu to the mb it is impossible to know for certain but based on what we know it is the most logical solution
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January 29, 2013 8:24:40 AM

sounds like the psu is done for. could be the mobo too, though. btw, is the cooler on the 7750 spinning?
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January 29, 2013 10:50:19 AM

paulemannsen said:
sounds like the psu is done for. could be the mobo too, though. btw, is the cooler on the 7750 spinning?


The fans start fine on the new AMD, but like Fulgurant said, "The 7750, by definition, draws less power than your 9800GT, because the 7750 only requires power from the PCIe slot on your motherboard." So maybe it's getting enough from the PSU to power that fan but the PSU isn't putting out enough to power the Nvidia's fan. I think I may try to hook up my old Nvidia card in a different machine to see if I can get power to it. That will at least let me know if I have a good or bad card, regardless if the PSU is causing the issue or not.

"...when a video card dies, it usually misbehaves in more colorful ways before it simply stops sending a signal -- artifacts on the screen..."

I've seen this before many many times with console GPUs going bad. I saw that nearly everyother day playing on a 360. Like I said, I don't think I was putting a lot of stress on that card. Not like on the GPUs of 360s and PS3s.
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January 29, 2013 3:30:23 PM

devilchuk17 said:
The fans start fine on the new AMD, but like Fulgurant said, "The 7750, by definition, draws less power than your 9800GT, because the 7750 only requires power from the PCIe slot on your motherboard." So maybe it's getting enough from the PSU to power that fan but the PSU isn't putting out enough to power the Nvidia's fan. I think I may try to hook up my old Nvidia card in a different machine to see if I can get power to it. That will at least let me know if I have a good or bad card, regardless if the PSU is causing the issue or not.

"...when a video card dies, it usually misbehaves in more colorful ways before it simply stops sending a signal -- artifacts on the screen..."

I've seen this before many many times with console GPUs going bad. I saw that nearly everyother day playing on a 360. Like I said, I don't think I was putting a lot of stress on that card. Not like on the GPUs of 360s and PS3s.


Oh, the fan does spin on the 7750? I thought (perhaps unjustifiably) that you couldn't get the 7750 to power on either. My fault.

It's an odd problem. It'd be great if you could throw your 9800 in an alternative machine to see if it works.
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January 30, 2013 12:47:46 PM

Fulgurant said:
Oh, the fan does spin on the 7750? I thought (perhaps unjustifiably) that you couldn't get the 7750 to power on either. My fault.

It's an odd problem. It'd be great if you could throw your 9800 in an alternative machine to see if it works.


Ya know, now that read back through the post I did fail to mention that the AMD fan did spin (justified). I appreciate all of your help. I've been a bit busy but today after the grind I'm gonna try and install a new PSU. From everyone I've spoken with that seems to be the general feeling. Tomorrow I will try a different tower for my Nvidia to see if that card is actually bad. I'll keep you guys posted. Thanks again!
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January 31, 2013 1:29:52 AM

Best answer selected by devilchuk17.
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January 31, 2013 2:07:11 AM

Fulgurant said:
...it is possible that your PSU is bad, and/or that somehow you blew out the PCIe slot, which would explain why your 9800GT's fan stopped spinning (whereas, I'm assuming, everything else continued to function normally).

So the long and the short of all of that rambling is that your motherboard or your PSU sounds like the culprit (or both; if the PSU went squirrely it might have broken the motherboard). You've tried a different graphics card so that doesn't appear to be the problem.



New PSU did the trick. I put my old Nvidia back in and it operates just fine. Thank you guys for all of your help. You guys are awesome!! I went with a Corsair GS600. It is operating but it's fan keeps firing up and dying every few seconds. I think this is normal operation but it is kind of annoying.

THANKS AGAIN!
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