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New router ... now network is broken!

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Anonymous
December 31, 2004 4:55:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

Hi folks.

I used to have my rtv's network connection running well. I was running
a Lucent SDSL interface. Though the DHCP server was running (for guests
with laptops), the rtv never seemed to be able to talk to it. I
configured the rtv with a static IP and all was fine. I didn't even
need to add a MAC-to-IP static IP for the replay

So, I changed ISPs. Now I have a Westell Versalink on Verizon, and the
rtv won't network won't all. (PC works fine.)

First, I tried DHCP, which didn't work just like before. Whenever it
tries to get the IP from DHCP, it fails after a timeout. Usually in the
"More Info" one of three doesn't respond. Don't know why.

So, I tried doing a static IP as before. That doesn't work either.
Same as above.

I read the networking thread, and try disabled my DHCP server. Doesn't
work either.

And, my router's DHCP server doesn't allow you to associate an IP with a
MAC. Well, it sorta does, but only if it detects the device and guesses
it's name - which it doesn't for the rtv.

The interesting thing is in my router's logs:
DNS: Unknown host: 'production.replaytv.net.replaytv.net'
DNS: Unknown host: 'rddns-production.replaytv.net.replaytv.net'
DNS: Unknown host: 'rddns-production-backup.replaytv.net.replaytv.net'
DNS: Unknown host: 'rddns-production-backup.replaytv.net'

And I can't run my PC as a rtv server, since it's not on all the time -
the rtv is.

Ideas??

More about : router network broken

Anonymous
December 31, 2004 12:26:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

Do you have a Versalink 327W with wireless? I just got that too and sort of
having the same problems. The wireless can see the other systems connected
via CAT5 ports, but not other wireless connected systems. My old Netgear
router works fine before switching over to the Versalink.

One solution, I was thinking of, if I can't get an answer from Verizon or
Westell. Is buy the older Westell 2100 modem, from eBay, and hook up my
Netgear router to it. I know it works because my office, near my house is
currently running that setup.

The other solution you could try is to create a RIP from the RPTV straight
out to the internet. I don't know how vulnerable the RPTV, but I have not
heard of them being hacked over the internet.

Good Luck! and keep us posted.

JW

"SJT" <tringali@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:D k2Bd.6047$PY6.6022@trndny02...
> Hi folks.
>
> I used to have my rtv's network connection running well. I was running
> a Lucent SDSL interface. Though the DHCP server was running (for guests
> with laptops), the rtv never seemed to be able to talk to it. I
> configured the rtv with a static IP and all was fine. I didn't even
> need to add a MAC-to-IP static IP for the replay
>
> So, I changed ISPs. Now I have a Westell Versalink on Verizon, and the
> rtv won't network won't all. (PC works fine.)
>
> First, I tried DHCP, which didn't work just like before. Whenever it
> tries to get the IP from DHCP, it fails after a timeout. Usually in the
> "More Info" one of three doesn't respond. Don't know why.
>
> So, I tried doing a static IP as before. That doesn't work either.
> Same as above.
>
> I read the networking thread, and try disabled my DHCP server. Doesn't
> work either.
>
> And, my router's DHCP server doesn't allow you to associate an IP with a
> MAC. Well, it sorta does, but only if it detects the device and guesses
> it's name - which it doesn't for the rtv.
>
> The interesting thing is in my router's logs:
> DNS: Unknown host: 'production.replaytv.net.replaytv.net'
> DNS: Unknown host: 'rddns-production.replaytv.net.replaytv.net'
> DNS: Unknown host: 'rddns-production-backup.replaytv.net.replaytv.net'
> DNS: Unknown host: 'rddns-production-backup.replaytv.net'
>
> And I can't run my PC as a rtv server, since it's not on all the time -
> the rtv is.
>
> Ideas??
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 2:58:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 01:55:47 GMT, SJT <tringali@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Hi folks.
>
>I used to have my rtv's network connection running well. I was running
>a Lucent SDSL interface. Though the DHCP server was running (for guests
>with laptops), the rtv never seemed to be able to talk to it. I
>configured the rtv with a static IP and all was fine. I didn't even
>need to add a MAC-to-IP static IP for the replay
>
>So, I changed ISPs. Now I have a Westell Versalink on Verizon, and the
>rtv won't network won't all. (PC works fine.)
>
>First, I tried DHCP, which didn't work just like before. Whenever it
>tries to get the IP from DHCP, it fails after a timeout. Usually in the
>"More Info" one of three doesn't respond. Don't know why.
>
>So, I tried doing a static IP as before. That doesn't work either.
>Same as above.
>
>I read the networking thread, and try disabled my DHCP server. Doesn't
>work either.
>
>And, my router's DHCP server doesn't allow you to associate an IP with a
>MAC. Well, it sorta does, but only if it detects the device and guesses
>it's name - which it doesn't for the rtv.
>

The Replay naming bug was fixd once. I guess they broke it later.

>The interesting thing is in my router's logs:
> DNS: Unknown host: 'production.replaytv.net.replaytv.net'
> DNS: Unknown host: 'rddns-production.replaytv.net.replaytv.net'
> DNS: Unknown host: 'rddns-production-backup.replaytv.net.replaytv.net'
> DNS: Unknown host: 'rddns-production-backup.replaytv.net'
>

When you changed ISPs, you changed DNS server addresses (there's
usually 2 of them). All your networked devices (both computer and
Replays) need to have the correct values. You may need to update some
settings. If you have an internet connection at any computer, you can
get that information from the router. Also, check the ISPs website or
contact them.

>And I can't run my PC as a rtv server, since it's not on all the time -
>the rtv is.
>
>Ideas??

My router (Linksys) doesn't support permanently assigned IP addresses
(often called "static DHCP"). My solution was to disable its DHCP
server and use the program from
http://ruttkamp.gmxhome.de/dhcpsrv/dhcpsrv.htm. You run this program
on any computer on your network and it lets you assign specific IP
addresses to each networked device. You don't have to have it running
all the time, just when you're rebooting a device on the network.

Since I installed that (a few months ago), I have not had a problem
with a Replay (I have 3 5xxx units) communicating on the network.

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
Related resources
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 6:37:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

SJT wrote:
> Hi folks.
>
>I didn't even
> need to add a MAC-to-IP static IP for the replay

Yes, YOU DO. Replays have a network bug that allows the OS and hdw to
have different IP addresses. The router should be set to DHCP AND set up
reserve ip addresses for the Replay. If there is no DHCP server the
Replay will still look for one (even if set for static) and delay
booting for several minutes.

make the changes to the router, set the Replay to DHCP in setup. Save
the config. Turn off the Replay, pull the plug for 5 minutes and then
repower. After the replay boots up, go into network setup and change it
from DHCP (it should have downloaded the new info from the router) to
static.

Everything should work fine and continue to do so.
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 6:42:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 15:37:25 -0500, Tony D <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>SJT wrote:
>> Hi folks.
>>
>>I didn't even
>> need to add a MAC-to-IP static IP for the replay
>
>Yes, YOU DO. Replays have a network bug that allows the OS and hdw to
>have different IP addresses. The router should be set to DHCP AND set up
>reserve ip addresses for the Replay. If there is no DHCP server the
>Replay will still look for one (even if set for static) and delay
>booting for several minutes.
>
>make the changes to the router, set the Replay to DHCP in setup. Save
>the config. Turn off the Replay, pull the plug for 5 minutes and then
>repower. After the replay boots up, go into network setup and change it
>from DHCP (it should have downloaded the new info from the router) to
>static.
>
>Everything should work fine and continue to do so.

The program (http://ruttkamp.gmxhome.de/dhcpsrv/dhcpsrv.htm ) I often
post a link to is something you can use if your router doesn't allow
this. Put it on any computer on your network and turn off the one in
the router. I've been using it for a few months now, and have had no
Replays failing to use the network.

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
December 31, 2004 6:50:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

Joseph Wind wrote:

> Do you have a Versalink 327W with wireless?

Yes, I do. I have the wireless turned off, though.

I ran a test last night, while it was trying to connect via manual
setup, I ran a ping on the IP I assigned to the rtv. Turns out that
there a good deal of packet loss, about 75%.

So, I'm going to try a new network cable. I had already tried it awhile
back and it failed, but I read some posts here about how to boot and
connect everything in order, so I need to try that again.

The old Lucent was a 10mbit hub, and the Westell is a 100mbit switch, so
maybe it's more sensitive to bad cables now.
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 8:13:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

"ST" <tringali@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:6zeBd.17002$2X6.8222@trnddc07...
> So, I'm going to try a new network cable. I had already tried it awhile
> back and it failed, but I read some posts here about how to boot and
> connect everything in order, so I need to try that again.
>
> The old Lucent was a 10mbit hub, and the Westell is a 100mbit switch, so
> maybe it's more sensitive to bad cables now.

10M-bit is what some people call barb wire technology. It will run almost
on anything including barb wire. 100Mbit and 1Gbit are more sensitive to
line quality. It might just be your cable and your setup. How far is it
from your unit to the modem? You could install a 10Mbit hub between the
Replay and the Westell, to see if it is the cable.

Good Luck!

JW
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 8:13:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 17:13:21 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:

>"ST" <tringali@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:6zeBd.17002$2X6.8222@trnddc07...
>> So, I'm going to try a new network cable. I had already tried it awhile
>> back and it failed, but I read some posts here about how to boot and
>> connect everything in order, so I need to try that again.
>>
>> The old Lucent was a 10mbit hub, and the Westell is a 100mbit switch, so
>> maybe it's more sensitive to bad cables now.
>
>10M-bit is what some people call barb wire technology. It will run almost
>on anything including barb wire. 100Mbit and 1Gbit are more sensitive to
>line quality. It might just be your cable and your setup. How far is it
>from your unit to the modem? You could install a 10Mbit hub between the
>Replay and the Westell, to see if it is the cable.
>
>Good Luck!
>
>JW
>
>
>

My first network was 10Mbit. It worked fine with one of the cables
wired incorrectly (pins 3&6 were connected to the same pins on each
end, but were not in the same pair). 100Mbit refused to work on this
cable. It needed the cable to be fixed, to put 3&6 in the same pair.

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
December 31, 2004 8:57:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

The cable is pretty long, about 25' into the basement, and cable is
probably even longer than that. I'll get a new cable and see if the
pings work any better.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 1:35:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

ST wrote:
> The cable is pretty long, about 25' into the basement, and cable is
> probably even longer than that. I'll get a new cable and see if the
> pings work any better.

Just so you know... I run fifty feet between this laptop and the router
when in wired mode (No wire when in wireless... but I don't often use
that mode) and get zero packet loss between it and the replay

Replay is on, I think a six foot Cat-5 (it's next to the router only
thing physically closer to the router is the modem, The router sits atop
it sometimes (in front of it just now) and the monitor for my other two
computers (router bolted to it)
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 4:42:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
news:nmhbt0pfonfimder57i8khj9mnko9i6pss@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 15:37:25 -0500, Tony D <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
>
> >SJT wrote:
> >> Hi folks.
> >>
> >>I didn't even
> >> need to add a MAC-to-IP static IP for the replay
> >
> >Yes, YOU DO. Replays have a network bug that allows the OS and hdw to
> >have different IP addresses. The router should be set to DHCP AND set up
> >reserve ip addresses for the Replay. If there is no DHCP server the
> >Replay will still look for one (even if set for static) and delay
> >booting for several minutes.
> >
> >make the changes to the router, set the Replay to DHCP in setup. Save
> >the config. Turn off the Replay, pull the plug for 5 minutes and then
> >repower. After the replay boots up, go into network setup and change it
> >from DHCP (it should have downloaded the new info from the router) to
> >static.
> >
> >Everything should work fine and continue to do so.
>
> The program (http://ruttkamp.gmxhome.de/dhcpsrv/dhcpsrv.htm ) I often
> post a link to is something you can use if your router doesn't allow
> this. Put it on any computer on your network and turn off the one in
> the router. I've been using it for a few months now, and have had no
> Replays failing to use the network.

Why not just assign a static IP to each system? If you have 5 or less
systems that require IPs it's easier to just give them each Static IP. That
way you know which IP is assigned to certain system. DHCP is was designed
to be used on larger network, and was subsequently used for Novice users
because it's practically "plug and play". DHCP is not fool proof, because
the IP do expire, if you set them for a year. If for some reason the router
(DHCP server) is rebooted, the table is cleared and IPs that were assigned,
may become invalid, thus causing errors.

Most routers don't use the entire range of IP subnet. i.e. 192.168.1.1 to
192.168.1.255 They usually assign a smaller range like 192.168.1.100 to
192.168.1.128. Everything else can be used for static IP, except for
192.168.1.1 which is usually the router's default IP and gateway IP.

How hard is it to write the assigned IP address on a piece of masking tape
on the side or back of the unit?

Happy New Year everyone!!!

JW
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 4:42:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

> Why not just assign a static IP to each system? If you have 5 or less
> systems that require IPs it's easier to just give them each Static IP. That
> way you know which IP is assigned to certain system. DHCP is was designed
> to be used on larger network, and was subsequently used for Novice users
> because it's practically "plug and play". DHCP is not fool proof, because
> the IP do expire, if you set them for a year. If for some reason the router
> (DHCP server) is rebooted, the table is cleared and IPs that were assigned,
> may become invalid, thus causing errors.
>
> Most routers don't use the entire range of IP subnet. i.e. 192.168.1.1 to
> 192.168.1.255 They usually assign a smaller range like 192.168.1.100 to
> 192.168.1.128. Everything else can be used for static IP, except for
> 192.168.1.1 which is usually the router's default IP and gateway IP.
>
> How hard is it to write the assigned IP address on a piece of masking tape
> on the side or back of the unit?

And AGAIN, static alone will not fix the Replay network bug because on
bootup either the hdw or OS will issue a DHCP request ANYWAY. Using
reserved ips in the router is the only way to insure both parts of the
Replay always get the same address.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 4:42:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 01:42:11 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:

>
>"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
>news:nmhbt0pfonfimder57i8khj9mnko9i6pss@4ax.com...
>> On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 15:37:25 -0500, Tony D <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
>>
>> >SJT wrote:
>> >> Hi folks.
>> >>
>> >>I didn't even
>> >> need to add a MAC-to-IP static IP for the replay
>> >
>> >Yes, YOU DO. Replays have a network bug that allows the OS and hdw to
>> >have different IP addresses. The router should be set to DHCP AND set up
>> >reserve ip addresses for the Replay. If there is no DHCP server the
>> >Replay will still look for one (even if set for static) and delay
>> >booting for several minutes.
>> >
>> >make the changes to the router, set the Replay to DHCP in setup. Save
>> >the config. Turn off the Replay, pull the plug for 5 minutes and then
>> >repower. After the replay boots up, go into network setup and change it
>> >from DHCP (it should have downloaded the new info from the router) to
>> >static.
>> >
>> >Everything should work fine and continue to do so.
>>
>> The program (http://ruttkamp.gmxhome.de/dhcpsrv/dhcpsrv.htm ) I often
>> post a link to is something you can use if your router doesn't allow
>> this. Put it on any computer on your network and turn off the one in
>> the router. I've been using it for a few months now, and have had no
>> Replays failing to use the network.
>
>Why not just assign a static IP to each system? If you have 5 or less
>systems that require IPs it's easier to just give them each Static IP. That
>way you know which IP is assigned to certain system.

And turn off the DHCP server, to stop the Replay from requesting an IP
(which it ALWAYS does, even when set to static).

Also, DHCP has some advantages like supplying DNS addresses from a
central point (completely automatic if your router does it). Failure
to update DNS addresses is one common cause of not being able to
access the internet.

> DHCP is was designed
>to be used on larger network, and was subsequently used for Novice users
>because it's practically "plug and play". DHCP is not fool proof, because
>the IP do expire, if you set them for a year. If for some reason the router
>(DHCP server) is rebooted, the table is cleared and IPs that were assigned,
>may become invalid, thus causing errors.
>

This usually doesn't happen because the computer will try to renew the
address it had. The bug in the Replay prevents it from taking
advantage of this.

>Most routers don't use the entire range of IP subnet.

That would be the DHCP SERVER that doesn't use the whole thing. The
router will use the whole subnet (192.168.1.y where all values of "y"
are part of the subnet).

> i.e. 192.168.1.1 to
>192.168.1.255 They usually assign a smaller range like 192.168.1.100 to
>192.168.1.128.

This is called the DHCP pool.

> Everything else can be used for static IP, except for
>192.168.1.1 which is usually the router's default IP and gateway IP

and except for 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.1.255, these are special
addresses).

>
>How hard is it to write the assigned IP address on a piece of masking tape
>on the side or back of the unit?

It would do nothing to fix the bug in the Replay software that causes
these problems.


Note that addresses in the range 192.168.1.x are what Linksys routers
use. Other brands often use 192.168.0.x

>
>Happy New Year everyone!!!
>

Happy new year.

>JW
>

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 4:42:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 21:49:03 -0500, Tony D <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>> Why not just assign a static IP to each system? If you have 5 or less
>> systems that require IPs it's easier to just give them each Static IP. That
>> way you know which IP is assigned to certain system. DHCP is was designed
>> to be used on larger network, and was subsequently used for Novice users
>> because it's practically "plug and play". DHCP is not fool proof, because
>> the IP do expire, if you set them for a year. If for some reason the router
>> (DHCP server) is rebooted, the table is cleared and IPs that were assigned,
>> may become invalid, thus causing errors.
>>
>> Most routers don't use the entire range of IP subnet. i.e. 192.168.1.1 to
>> 192.168.1.255 They usually assign a smaller range like 192.168.1.100 to
>> 192.168.1.128. Everything else can be used for static IP, except for
>> 192.168.1.1 which is usually the router's default IP and gateway IP.
>>
>> How hard is it to write the assigned IP address on a piece of masking tape
>> on the side or back of the unit?
>
>And AGAIN, static alone will not fix the Replay network bug because on
>bootup either the hdw or OS will issue a DHCP request ANYWAY. Using
>reserved ips in the router

Small correction: reserved IPs in the DHCP server. A lot of routers
don't have that ability. In that case, you can use software on a
computer instead.

> is the only way to insure both parts of the
>Replay always get the same address.

And if the IP changes during a transfer (something that shouldn't
happen, but will because of the bug in the Replay) it will cause the
transfer to fail.

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 4:54:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
news:tq4bt09f8l9r4v38q5sand83l53n2e340i@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 17:13:21 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:
>
> My first network was 10Mbit. It worked fine with one of the cables
> wired incorrectly (pins 3&6 were connected to the same pins on each
> end, but were not in the same pair). 100Mbit refused to work on this
> cable. It needed the cable to be fixed, to put 3&6 in the same pair.
>

10Mbit only needs two wires to work. The reason your 3&6 did not work was
because they were not on the same twisted pair. The same color should be on
the same pin. 1/2, 3/6, 4/5, and 7/8 are each a twisted pair needed for
Ethernet. 10Mbit has a range of 1000ft, while 100Mbit has a range of half
of that.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 4:54:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 01:54:22 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:

>"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
>news:tq4bt09f8l9r4v38q5sand83l53n2e340i@4ax.com...
>> On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 17:13:21 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:
>>
>> My first network was 10Mbit. It worked fine with one of the cables
>> wired incorrectly (pins 3&6 were connected to the same pins on each
>> end, but were not in the same pair). 100Mbit refused to work on this
>> cable. It needed the cable to be fixed, to put 3&6 in the same pair.
>>
>
>10Mbit only needs two wires to work.

That would be 2 pairs.

> The reason your 3&6 did not work was
>because they were not on the same twisted pair.

True. Of course they DID work with 10Mbit.

> The same color should be on
>the same pin. 1/2, 3/6, 4/5, and 7/8 are each a twisted pair needed for
>Ethernet.

Only the first 2 pairs are needed for most forms of ethernet. I heard
about one that needed all 4 pairs once, but it's not in common use.

> 10Mbit has a range of 1000ft, while 100Mbit has a range of half
>of that.
>

How are you determining the range, and what effect do switches have on
that?

The information I have (which is for 10Mbit) says a cable can be 100
meters (about 325 feet), and up to 5 segments can be used. That makes
the range 1625 feet (maximum between any 2 machines).

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 5:44:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

Success!

The old wire must have a had a kink or something that didn't like
running at 100mbit. I created a new wire from scratch, tested it with a
wire tester to make sure I didn't mess up the wiring, and it worked great.

Even DHCP worked... I was shocked to see it worked! I could download
the channel guide, and DVArchive can see it now. Which is all I really
need. This brings me back to what I had before I switched ISPs.

So I rebooted it, and I indeed watched get an address via DHCP, and then
another:

IP Address MAC Address Name Status
192.168.1.45 00:0a:97:02:0c:ec rtv family room Active
192.168.1.46 00:0a:97:02:0c:ec * Inactive
192.168.1.47 00:01:02:c0:9d:80 miles Active

The funny thing is that I had a ping to .46 running the entire time
during boot. In the middle of the boot, I swear, it switched to .45. I
thought I was seeing things, so started another ping to .46. Sure
enough, a ping to .46 results in it pinging .45! Maybe an ICMP redirect
or something weird like that. Never seen one before.

So, what does forcing a static IP (DHCP) do? Does it make IVS work?
Everything else seems fine now.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 5:44:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

> The funny thing is that I had a ping to .46 running the entire time
> during boot. In the middle of the boot, I swear, it switched to .45. I
> thought I was seeing things, so started another ping to .46. Sure
> enough, a ping to .46 results in it pinging .45! Maybe an ICMP redirect
> or something weird like that. Never seen one before.
>
> So, what does forcing a static IP (DHCP) do? Does it make IVS work?
> Everything else seems fine now.

"reserved ip" insures both parts of the Replay get the same address.
Static on the Replay will sometimes be ok if the Replay never tries to
renew it's lease. You also should have a DHCP server on the network
because NO MATTER WHAT the Replay will look for it. If there is no
server, it may take several more minutes to boot. Now contributors to
this group may banter back and forth about principles of networking, but
this is a highly documented Replay bug (just search on the Replay forum
at avsforum.com), and this procedure is the only bulletproof scheme.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 6:09:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

"Tony D" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:o LudneOcRak9kkvcRVn-1Q@comcast.com...
> > Why not just assign a static IP to each system? If you have 5 or less
> > systems that require IPs it's easier to just give them each Static IP.
That
> > way you know which IP is assigned to certain system. DHCP is was
designed
> > to be used on larger network, and was subsequently used for Novice users
> > because it's practically "plug and play". DHCP is not fool proof,
because
> > the IP do expire, if you set them for a year. If for some reason the
router
> > (DHCP server) is rebooted, the table is cleared and IPs that were
assigned,
> > may become invalid, thus causing errors.
> >
> > Most routers don't use the entire range of IP subnet. i.e. 192.168.1.1
to
> > 192.168.1.255 They usually assign a smaller range like 192.168.1.100 to
> > 192.168.1.128. Everything else can be used for static IP, except for
> > 192.168.1.1 which is usually the router's default IP and gateway IP.
> >
> > How hard is it to write the assigned IP address on a piece of masking
tape
> > on the side or back of the unit?
>
> And AGAIN, static alone will not fix the Replay network bug because on
> bootup either the hdw or OS will issue a DHCP request ANYWAY. Using
> reserved ips in the router is the only way to insure both parts of the
> Replay always get the same address.

Then why does RPTV allow you to assign a static IP? Network Bug Error? OK.
But in that scenario, your still better off assigning everything else a
static IP and use one IP for DHCP, which may still cause errors. If another
system come online and is on DCHP, which most are on by default anyways.
Now you have an IP conflict.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 6:25:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

"SJT" <tringali@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:I8oBd.10329$sh5.7770@trndny08...
> Success!
>
> The old wire must have a had a kink or something that didn't like
> running at 100mbit. I created a new wire from scratch, tested it with a
> wire tester to make sure I didn't mess up the wiring, and it worked great.
>
> Even DHCP worked... I was shocked to see it worked! I could download
> the channel guide, and DVArchive can see it now. Which is all I really
> need. This brings me back to what I had before I switched ISPs.
>
> So I rebooted it, and I indeed watched get an address via DHCP, and then
> another:
>
> IP Address MAC Address Name Status
> 192.168.1.45 00:0a:97:02:0c:ec rtv family room Active
> 192.168.1.46 00:0a:97:02:0c:ec * Inactive
> 192.168.1.47 00:01:02:c0:9d:80 miles Active
>
> The funny thing is that I had a ping to .46 running the entire time
> during boot. In the middle of the boot, I swear, it switched to .45. I
> thought I was seeing things, so started another ping to .46. Sure
> enough, a ping to .46 results in it pinging .45! Maybe an ICMP redirect
> or something weird like that. Never seen one before.
>
> So, what does forcing a static IP (DHCP) do? Does it make IVS work?
> Everything else seems fine now.

Good to hear that. If you have a static IP, you don't need to use DHCP.

You must of had a bad pin connect or a bad kink. 10Base-T/10Mbit can run on
almost anything, even a phone cord if you're desperate. Though most phone
cords are twisted (not the same on both ends), but would work if it were
straight through for very short distances. Glad you got it fixed.

Happy New Year!

JW
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 9:26:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
news:mi4ct0lcv3mj0ra2obmiq38g2mlj1feia1@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 01:54:22 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:
>
> >"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
> >news:tq4bt09f8l9r4v38q5sand83l53n2e340i@4ax.com...
> >> On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 17:13:21 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> My first network was 10Mbit. It worked fine with one of the cables
> >> wired incorrectly (pins 3&6 were connected to the same pins on each
> >> end, but were not in the same pair). 100Mbit refused to work on this
> >> cable. It needed the cable to be fixed, to put 3&6 in the same pair.
> >>
> >
> >10Mbit only needs two wires to work.
>
> That would be 2 pairs.
>

Not exactly, two conductors, take coax for example. I was refering to
10Base2.

> > The reason your 3&6 did not work was
> >because they were not on the same twisted pair.
>
> True. Of course they DID work with 10Mbit.
>
Let me refraze that, it did not work for 100Mbit, but 10Mbit does not
require twisted pairs, it's also very forgiving.

> > The same color should be on
> >the same pin. 1/2, 3/6, 4/5, and 7/8 are each a twisted pair needed for
> >Ethernet.
>
> Only the first 2 pairs are needed for most forms of ethernet. I heard
> about one that needed all 4 pairs once, but it's not in common use.
>
True. The other pairs are used as redundant pairs. If that were the case we
would not need CAT5 cabling, CAT3 would suffice.

> > 10Mbit has a range of 1000ft, while 100Mbit has a range of half
> >of that.
> >
>
> How are you determining the range, and what effect do switches have on
> that?
>
> The information I have (which is for 10Mbit) says a cable can be 100
> meters (about 325 feet), and up to 5 segments can be used. That makes
> the range 1625 feet (maximum between any 2 machines).
>

10Base2 - Max segment length: 200 meters (656'). Max: 5 segments and (1000
meters, 3280') with repeaters/switches, I was sort of right, it was Meters,
not Feet.

10Base5 - Max segment length: 500 meters (1640'). Max: 5 segments and (2500
meters, 8200') with repeaters/switches.

In my FLUKE seminar on Cable anylizers, they said it could go a lot farther
than that depending one the quality of the cable. In many cases the wires
had to be certified, to go past the half the max segment. For real world
number those were pretty safe.

In 10Base-T: CAT3 was bare minimum.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 9:45:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

I don't want to turn this thread into an incomprehensible novella. Thanks
for the info and clarification.

One correction though, Linksys is not the only router to use 192.168.1.x,
my new Westell uses it to and probably a lot of other new routers coming
from China. But that just splitting hairs. Most router's default to use
192.168.0.x or 192.168.1.x, which really does not matter because 192.168.y.x
is entire subnet that could be used. They can be changed in the router
setup. Be adventurous and use the 172.z.y.x subnet instead.

Good Grief!

"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
news:fb5ct0pvdnmmqo9ggb0suefupeuk5rrhcl@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 01:42:11 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
> >news:nmhbt0pfonfimder57i8khj9mnko9i6pss@4ax.com...
> >> On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 15:37:25 -0500, Tony D <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> >SJT wrote:
> >> >> Hi folks.
> >> >>
> >> >>I didn't even
> >> >> need to add a MAC-to-IP static IP for the replay
> >> >
> >> >Yes, YOU DO. Replays have a network bug that allows the OS and hdw to
> >> >have different IP addresses. The router should be set to DHCP AND set
up
> >> >reserve ip addresses for the Replay. If there is no DHCP server the
> >> >Replay will still look for one (even if set for static) and delay
> >> >booting for several minutes.
> >> >
> >> >make the changes to the router, set the Replay to DHCP in setup. Save
> >> >the config. Turn off the Replay, pull the plug for 5 minutes and then
> >> >repower. After the replay boots up, go into network setup and change
it
> >> >from DHCP (it should have downloaded the new info from the router) to
> >> >static.
> >> >
> >> >Everything should work fine and continue to do so.
> >>
> >> The program (http://ruttkamp.gmxhome.de/dhcpsrv/dhcpsrv.htm ) I often
> >> post a link to is something you can use if your router doesn't allow
> >> this. Put it on any computer on your network and turn off the one in
> >> the router. I've been using it for a few months now, and have had no
> >> Replays failing to use the network.
> >
> >Why not just assign a static IP to each system? If you have 5 or less
> >systems that require IPs it's easier to just give them each Static IP.
That
> >way you know which IP is assigned to certain system.
>
> And turn off the DHCP server, to stop the Replay from requesting an IP
> (which it ALWAYS does, even when set to static).
>
> Also, DHCP has some advantages like supplying DNS addresses from a
> central point (completely automatic if your router does it). Failure
> to update DNS addresses is one common cause of not being able to
> access the internet.
>
> > DHCP is was designed
> >to be used on larger network, and was subsequently used for Novice users
> >because it's practically "plug and play". DHCP is not fool proof,
because
> >the IP do expire, if you set them for a year. If for some reason the
router
> >(DHCP server) is rebooted, the table is cleared and IPs that were
assigned,
> >may become invalid, thus causing errors.
> >
>
> This usually doesn't happen because the computer will try to renew the
> address it had. The bug in the Replay prevents it from taking
> advantage of this.
>
> >Most routers don't use the entire range of IP subnet.
>
> That would be the DHCP SERVER that doesn't use the whole thing. The
> router will use the whole subnet (192.168.1.y where all values of "y"
> are part of the subnet).
>
> > i.e. 192.168.1.1 to
> >192.168.1.255 They usually assign a smaller range like 192.168.1.100 to
> >192.168.1.128.
>
> This is called the DHCP pool.
>
> > Everything else can be used for static IP, except for
> >192.168.1.1 which is usually the router's default IP and gateway IP
>
> and except for 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.1.255, these are special
> addresses).
>
> >
> >How hard is it to write the assigned IP address on a piece of masking
tape
> >on the side or back of the unit?
>
> It would do nothing to fix the bug in the Replay software that causes
> these problems.
>
>
> Note that addresses in the range 192.168.1.x are what Linksys routers
> use. Other brands often use 192.168.0.x
>
> >
> >Happy New Year everyone!!!
> >
>
> Happy new year.
>
> >JW
> >
>
> --
> Mark Lloyd
> has a Replay 5xxx
> http://go.to/notstupid
> http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
>
> "It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
> paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
> anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 10:18:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

"Tony D" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:jrmdnfldmYyosEvcRVn-iQ@comcast.com...
> > The funny thing is that I had a ping to .46 running the entire time
> > during boot. In the middle of the boot, I swear, it switched to .45. I
> > thought I was seeing things, so started another ping to .46. Sure
> > enough, a ping to .46 results in it pinging .45! Maybe an ICMP redirect
> > or something weird like that. Never seen one before.
> >
> > So, what does forcing a static IP (DHCP) do? Does it make IVS work?
> > Everything else seems fine now.
>
> "reserved ip" insures both parts of the Replay get the same address.
> Static on the Replay will sometimes be ok if the Replay never tries to
> renew it's lease. You also should have a DHCP server on the network
> because NO MATTER WHAT the Replay will look for it. If there is no
> server, it may take several more minutes to boot. Now contributors to
> this group may banter back and forth about principles of networking, but
> this is a highly documented Replay bug (just search on the Replay forum
> at avsforum.com), and this procedure is the only bulletproof scheme.

There is no bulletproof scheme if there is a bug in the software. I
understand the concept of a "reserved IP", but you did not explain how to
reserve the IP in the router. A "reserved IP" can be any IP not in the
DHCP pool, .0, .1, or .255 It needs a MAC address so it knows who to
reserve it for, otherwise it's all for not. It needs to be saved to ROM, if
not, it will lose the reservation when the router gets rebooted. I look at
from a Murphy's Law point of view, stuff does happen.

BTW ST, one of the reasons your ping went both to .45 and .46 was because
the router had not released the IP and removed it from the table. I did not
notice until now, they both had the same MAC address.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 2:12:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

Joseph Wind wrote:
> I don't want to turn this thread into an incomprehensible novella. Thanks
> for the info and clarification.
>
> One correction though, Linksys is not the only router to use 192.168.1.x,
> my new Westell uses it to and probably a lot of other new routers coming
> from China. But that just splitting hairs. Most router's default to use
> 192.168.0.x or 192.168.1.x, which really does not matter because 192.168.y.x
> is entire subnet that could be used. They can be changed in the router
> setup. Be adventurous and use the 172.z.y.x subnet instead.

Not really a correction as only Linksys and D-Link was discussed,
logically with other makes you need to check (and yes, I know that
logically... Is not how many folks think)

Since I use multiple routers I fed the fire wall 192.168.0.0 through
192.168.255.255 seems to be working
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 2:39:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

> There is no bulletproof scheme if there is a bug in the software. I
> understand the concept of a "reserved IP", but you did not explain how to
> reserve the IP in the router. A "reserved IP" can be any IP not in the
> DHCP pool, .0, .1, or .255 It needs a MAC address so it knows who to
> reserve it for, otherwise it's all for not. It needs to be saved to ROM, if
> not, it will lose the reservation when the router gets rebooted. I look at
> from a Murphy's Law point of view, stuff does happen.

Every router I've used in years has reserved IP. And it does not matter
if the address is in the DHCP range. And the reservation table is not
lost on a reboot. Reset yes, reboot no.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 3:28:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 06:26:36 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:

>
>"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
>news:mi4ct0lcv3mj0ra2obmiq38g2mlj1feia1@4ax.com...
>> On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 01:54:22 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:
>>
>> >"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
>> >news:tq4bt09f8l9r4v38q5sand83l53n2e340i@4ax.com...
>> >> On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 17:13:21 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> My first network was 10Mbit. It worked fine with one of the cables
>> >> wired incorrectly (pins 3&6 were connected to the same pins on each
>> >> end, but were not in the same pair). 100Mbit refused to work on this
>> >> cable. It needed the cable to be fixed, to put 3&6 in the same pair.
>> >>
>> >
>> >10Mbit only needs two wires to work.
>>
>> That would be 2 pairs.
>>
>
>Not exactly, two conductors, take coax for example. I was refering to
>10Base2.
>

Sorry for the error.

>> > The reason your 3&6 did not work was
>> >because they were not on the same twisted pair.
>>
>> True. Of course they DID work with 10Mbit.
>>
>Let me refraze that, it did not work for 100Mbit, but 10Mbit does not
>require twisted pairs, it's also very forgiving.
>
>> > The same color should be on
>> >the same pin. 1/2, 3/6, 4/5, and 7/8 are each a twisted pair needed for
>> >Ethernet.
>>
>> Only the first 2 pairs are needed for most forms of ethernet. I heard
>> about one that needed all 4 pairs once, but it's not in common use.
>>
>True. The other pairs are used as redundant pairs. If that were the case we
>would not need CAT5 cabling, CAT3 would suffice.

The extra pairs are often unused. That seems to be the recommendation
(to leave them unused). I've seen ethernet cables that don't have
those extra pairs, it makes no difference. There is more to the CAT5
specification than number of pairs.

>
>> > 10Mbit has a range of 1000ft, while 100Mbit has a range of half
>> >of that.
>> >
>>
>> How are you determining the range, and what effect do switches have on
>> that?
>>
>> The information I have (which is for 10Mbit) says a cable can be 100
>> meters (about 325 feet), and up to 5 segments can be used. That makes
>> the range 1625 feet (maximum between any 2 machines).
>>
>
>10Base2 - Max segment length: 200 meters (656'). Max: 5 segments and (1000
>meters, 3280') with repeaters/switches, I was sort of right, it was Meters,
>not Feet.
>

And I guess the "half that" for 100Mbit was meters too?

>10Base5 - Max segment length: 500 meters (1640'). Max: 5 segments and (2500
>meters, 8200') with repeaters/switches.
>
>In my FLUKE seminar on Cable anylizers, they said it could go a lot farther
>than that depending one the quality of the cable. In many cases the wires
>had to be certified, to go past the half the max segment. For real world
>number those were pretty safe.
>
>In 10Base-T: CAT3 was bare minimum.
>

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 3:31:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 03:09:32 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.org> wrote:

>"Tony D" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>news:o LudneOcRak9kkvcRVn-1Q@comcast.com...
>> > Why not just assign a static IP to each system? If you have 5 or less
>> > systems that require IPs it's easier to just give them each Static IP.
>That
>> > way you know which IP is assigned to certain system. DHCP is was
>designed
>> > to be used on larger network, and was subsequently used for Novice users
>> > because it's practically "plug and play". DHCP is not fool proof,
>because
>> > the IP do expire, if you set them for a year. If for some reason the
>router
>> > (DHCP server) is rebooted, the table is cleared and IPs that were
>assigned,
>> > may become invalid, thus causing errors.
>> >
>> > Most routers don't use the entire range of IP subnet. i.e. 192.168.1.1
>to
>> > 192.168.1.255 They usually assign a smaller range like 192.168.1.100 to
>> > 192.168.1.128. Everything else can be used for static IP, except for
>> > 192.168.1.1 which is usually the router's default IP and gateway IP.
>> >
>> > How hard is it to write the assigned IP address on a piece of masking
>tape
>> > on the side or back of the unit?
>>
>> And AGAIN, static alone will not fix the Replay network bug because on
>> bootup either the hdw or OS will issue a DHCP request ANYWAY. Using
>> reserved ips in the router is the only way to insure both parts of the
>> Replay always get the same address.
>
>Then why does RPTV allow you to assign a static IP?

They knew you might want to, but apparently knew nothing of the bug
that makes it useless.

> Network Bug Error? OK.
>But in that scenario, your still better off assigning everything else a
>static IP and use one IP for DHCP,

That would be an interesting thing to try, but how about assigning a
static IP to the Replay and DISABLING DHCP completely?

> which may still cause errors. If another
>system come online and is on DCHP, which most are on by default anyways.
>Now you have an IP conflict.
>

You could try the software I suggested. It's not perfect, but it does
work.

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 3:39:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 06:45:36 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:

>I don't want to turn this thread into an incomprehensible novella. Thanks
>for the info and clarification.
>
>One correction though, Linksys is not the only router to use 192.168.1.x,
>my new Westell uses it to and probably a lot of other new routers coming
>from China.

Thanks. I now know something else.

> But that just splitting hairs. Most router's default to use
>192.168.0.x or 192.168.1.x, which really does not matter because 192.168.y.x
>is entire subnet that could be used.

While either is just as good, it does matter in that all devices on
your LAN need to be in the same subnet. Either allows 254 devices
(including the router).

> They can be changed in the router
>setup. Be adventurous and use the 172.z.y.x subnet instead.
>

Would this be on any advantage (assuming your router could handle it)
other than when you're setting up a BIG network (you've specified a
subnet that can have 16,777,214 devices)?

>Good Grief!
>

BTW, "routers" is not posessive, and needs no '.

>"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
>news:fb5ct0pvdnmmqo9ggb0suefupeuk5rrhcl@4ax.com...
>> On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 01:42:11 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >"Mark Lloyd" <mlloyd@5xxxmail.com5xxx> wrote in message
>> >news:nmhbt0pfonfimder57i8khj9mnko9i6pss@4ax.com...
>> >> On Fri, 31 Dec 2004 15:37:25 -0500, Tony D <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> >SJT wrote:
>> >> >> Hi folks.
>> >> >>
>> >> >>I didn't even
>> >> >> need to add a MAC-to-IP static IP for the replay
>> >> >
>> >> >Yes, YOU DO. Replays have a network bug that allows the OS and hdw to
>> >> >have different IP addresses. The router should be set to DHCP AND set
>up
>> >> >reserve ip addresses for the Replay. If there is no DHCP server the
>> >> >Replay will still look for one (even if set for static) and delay
>> >> >booting for several minutes.
>> >> >
>> >> >make the changes to the router, set the Replay to DHCP in setup. Save
>> >> >the config. Turn off the Replay, pull the plug for 5 minutes and then
>> >> >repower. After the replay boots up, go into network setup and change
>it
>> >> >from DHCP (it should have downloaded the new info from the router) to
>> >> >static.
>> >> >
>> >> >Everything should work fine and continue to do so.
>> >>
>> >> The program (http://ruttkamp.gmxhome.de/dhcpsrv/dhcpsrv.htm ) I often
>> >> post a link to is something you can use if your router doesn't allow
>> >> this. Put it on any computer on your network and turn off the one in
>> >> the router. I've been using it for a few months now, and have had no
>> >> Replays failing to use the network.
>> >
>> >Why not just assign a static IP to each system? If you have 5 or less
>> >systems that require IPs it's easier to just give them each Static IP.
>That
>> >way you know which IP is assigned to certain system.
>>
>> And turn off the DHCP server, to stop the Replay from requesting an IP
>> (which it ALWAYS does, even when set to static).
>>
>> Also, DHCP has some advantages like supplying DNS addresses from a
>> central point (completely automatic if your router does it). Failure
>> to update DNS addresses is one common cause of not being able to
>> access the internet.
>>
>> > DHCP is was designed
>> >to be used on larger network, and was subsequently used for Novice users
>> >because it's practically "plug and play". DHCP is not fool proof,
>because
>> >the IP do expire, if you set them for a year. If for some reason the
>router
>> >(DHCP server) is rebooted, the table is cleared and IPs that were
>assigned,
>> >may become invalid, thus causing errors.
>> >
>>
>> This usually doesn't happen because the computer will try to renew the
>> address it had. The bug in the Replay prevents it from taking
>> advantage of this.
>>
>> >Most routers don't use the entire range of IP subnet.
>>
>> That would be the DHCP SERVER that doesn't use the whole thing. The
>> router will use the whole subnet (192.168.1.y where all values of "y"
>> are part of the subnet).
>>
>> > i.e. 192.168.1.1 to
>> >192.168.1.255 They usually assign a smaller range like 192.168.1.100 to
>> >192.168.1.128.
>>
>> This is called the DHCP pool.
>>
>> > Everything else can be used for static IP, except for
>> >192.168.1.1 which is usually the router's default IP and gateway IP
>>
>> and except for 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.1.255, these are special
>> addresses).
>>
>> >
>> >How hard is it to write the assigned IP address on a piece of masking
>tape
>> >on the side or back of the unit?
>>
>> It would do nothing to fix the bug in the Replay software that causes
>> these problems.
>>
>>
>> Note that addresses in the range 192.168.1.x are what Linksys routers
>> use. Other brands often use 192.168.0.x
>>
>> >
>> >Happy New Year everyone!!!
>> >
>>
>> Happy new year.
>>
>> >JW
>> >
>>
>> --
>> Mark Lloyd
>> has a Replay 5xxx
>> http://go.to/notstupid
>> http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
>>
>> "It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
>> paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
>> anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
>

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 3:41:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 11:39:31 -0500, Tony D <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>
>> There is no bulletproof scheme if there is a bug in the software. I
>> understand the concept of a "reserved IP", but you did not explain how to
>> reserve the IP in the router. A "reserved IP" can be any IP not in the
>> DHCP pool, .0, .1, or .255 It needs a MAC address so it knows who to
>> reserve it for, otherwise it's all for not. It needs to be saved to ROM, if
>> not, it will lose the reservation when the router gets rebooted. I look at
>> from a Murphy's Law point of view, stuff does happen.
>
>Every router I've used in years has reserved IP. And it does not matter
>if the address is in the DHCP range.

I had a router (D-Link) once that cared. It must still be in the same
subnet anyway.

> And the reservation table is not
>lost on a reboot. Reset yes, reboot no.

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 4:56:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 07:18:22 GMT, "Joseph Wind" <jpg@gif.com> wrote:

>"Tony D" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>news:jrmdnfldmYyosEvcRVn-iQ@comcast.com...
>> > The funny thing is that I had a ping to .46 running the entire time
>> > during boot. In the middle of the boot, I swear, it switched to .45. I
>> > thought I was seeing things, so started another ping to .46. Sure
>> > enough, a ping to .46 results in it pinging .45! Maybe an ICMP redirect
>> > or something weird like that. Never seen one before.
>> >
>> > So, what does forcing a static IP (DHCP) do? Does it make IVS work?
>> > Everything else seems fine now.
>>
>> "reserved ip" insures both parts of the Replay get the same address.
>> Static on the Replay will sometimes be ok if the Replay never tries to
>> renew it's lease. You also should have a DHCP server on the network
>> because NO MATTER WHAT the Replay will look for it. If there is no
>> server, it may take several more minutes to boot. Now contributors to
>> this group may banter back and forth about principles of networking, but
>> this is a highly documented Replay bug (just search on the Replay forum
>> at avsforum.com), and this procedure is the only bulletproof scheme.
>
>There is no bulletproof scheme if there is a bug in the software. I
>understand the concept of a "reserved IP", but you did not explain how to
>reserve the IP in the router. A "reserved IP" can be any IP not in the
>DHCP pool, .0, .1, or .255 It needs a MAC address so it knows who to
>reserve it for, otherwise it's all for not. It needs to be saved to ROM, if
>not, it will lose the reservation when the router gets rebooted. I look at
>from a Murphy's Law point of view, stuff does happen.
>
>BTW ST, one of the reasons your ping went both to .45 and .46 was because
>the router had not released the IP and removed it from the table. I did not
>notice until now, they both had the same MAC address.
>
Good eye. I was just about to respond with the same until I saw that
you had pointed out the MAC address.


--

Any information contained in this post is merely a
restatement of information found in the news archives
of the newsgroups alt.dss.hack, alt.binaries.satellite-tv,
and alt.dbs.echostar.hack found on Google Groups. The person
making this post has no firsthand knowledge of bypassing
satellite security measures.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 7:33:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

Thanks for the info, but by "what does it (static IP from DHCP) do" I
meant "what feature works that doesn't work now?". Right now, the
channel update and networking to DVArchive work fine. IVS does not.
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 10:15:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

SJT wrote:

> Thanks for the info, but by "what does it (static IP from DHCP) do" I
> meant "what feature works that doesn't work now?". Right now, the
> channel update and networking to DVArchive work fine. IVS does not.

Replay has a nasty bug whereby the hardware and the operating system can
wind up with different IP addresses. This causes wacky things to happen,
like one Replay won't see another but still get guide info, or a Replay
will connect and retrieve the guide but not be able to IVS.

When the unit starts up, no matter what the settings are, the HARDWARE
looks for a DHCP server. If there isn't one it can take several MORE
minutes to boot than normal because it has to "time out". Depending on
lease time, etc, the hardware can ask for and receive an IP address
which will be different than the one you have if you use static address
on the Replay. When the system boots the OS and it is set for DHCP, it
will be given a different address than the hardware because the hardware
address will not be available for use (the router has assigned it
already) Now you have different ip addresses.

If you set the Replay to static, say 192.168.1.20 and note its MAC
address XX:XX:XX:XX, you can then use the router's "reserved ip" table
to say that if a unit with MAC address XX:XX:XX:XX requests an IP, give
it 192.168.1.20. Now NO MATTER WHAT happens, both parts of the Replay
will always have an address of 192.168.1.20 and you are in Replay heaven
and never have to change unless you move. I know Mark keeps harping on
running a DHCP program, but to me this seems like a ridiculous
complication needed only if you have an ancient router that doesn't
support reserved ips. Junk the router, spend $29 bucks on a new one and
be done with it.
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 12:25:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 19:15:12 -0500, Tony D <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:

>SJT wrote:
>
>> Thanks for the info, but by "what does it (static IP from DHCP) do" I
>> meant "what feature works that doesn't work now?". Right now, the
>> channel update and networking to DVArchive work fine. IVS does not.
>
>Replay has a nasty bug whereby the hardware and the operating system can
>wind up with different IP addresses. This causes wacky things to happen,
>like one Replay won't see another but still get guide info, or a Replay
>will connect and retrieve the guide but not be able to IVS.
>
>When the unit starts up, no matter what the settings are, the HARDWARE
>looks for a DHCP server. If there isn't one it can take several MORE
>minutes to boot than normal because it has to "time out". Depending on
>lease time, etc, the hardware can ask for and receive an IP address
>which will be different than the one you have if you use static address
>on the Replay. When the system boots the OS and it is set for DHCP, it
>will be given a different address than the hardware because the hardware
>address will not be available for use (the router has assigned it
>already) Now you have different ip addresses.
>
>If you set the Replay to static, say 192.168.1.20 and note its MAC
>address XX:XX:XX:XX, you can then use the router's "reserved ip" table
>to say that if a unit with MAC address XX:XX:XX:XX requests an IP, give
>it 192.168.1.20. Now NO MATTER WHAT happens, both parts of the Replay
>will always have an address of 192.168.1.20 and you are in Replay heaven
>and never have to change unless you move. I know Mark keeps harping on
>running a DHCP program, but to me this seems like a ridiculous
>complication needed only if you have an ancient router that doesn't
>support reserved ips. Junk the router, spend $29 bucks on a new one and
>be done with it.

Every time I've mentioned that program, I've said it works if your
router doesn't support "reserved IP".

Sometimes you want it working now. You can download and install a
program anytime.

"Ancient" must not be that far in the past.

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 2:43:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

It works, even better now. As I type, IVS is downloading a test clip,
thanks to poopli.com. The whole DHCP bug thing apparently doesn't
affect me.

The (new) router has a really nice feature where you do can an inbound
portmap to a device name, regardless of IP obtained via DHCP. I set
that up, and boom, the online test works.

Thanks to everyone for their help!
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 2:43:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 23:43:26 GMT, SJT <tringali@yahoo.com> wrote:

>It works, even better now. As I type, IVS is downloading a test clip,
>thanks to poopli.com. The whole DHCP bug thing apparently doesn't
>affect me.
>
>The (new) router has a really nice feature where you do can an inbound
>portmap to a device name, regardless of IP obtained via DHCP. I set
>that up, and boom, the online test works.
>

Port forwarding to device name. That would be a good feature to have.

>Thanks to everyone for their help!

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://go.to/notstupid
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"It is a curious thing that every creed promises a
paradise which will be absolutely uninhabitable for
anyone of civilized taste." -- Evelyn Waugh
!