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Using a speaker switch box in reverse?

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Anonymous
July 23, 2004 4:41:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I'm trying to connect one set of speakers to 2 different amps, I have
a Radio Shack speaker selector. On amp A I have 2 sets of speaker
wire coming from the single sets of speaker out puts, one going to the
"C" port on the speaker switch box and the other going directly to
speakers. On amp B I have A and B speaker outs, so on this I have the
B speaker output connected to the B port on the speaker switchbox.

When none of the speaker selector are depressed I hear audio from amp
B on amp A, very strange.

Any ideas or suggestions?

Speaker Selector Box
Amp B - Speaker Out B ------------------Input B
Amp A - Speaker out ---+----------------Input C
|
+--Speakers


I hope I was clear with my setup.

Any help will be greatly appreciated

Lee
Anonymous
July 24, 2004 3:17:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Lee J wrote:
>
> I'm trying to connect one set of speakers to 2 different amps, I have
> a Radio Shack speaker selector. On amp A I have 2 sets of speaker
> wire coming from the single sets of speaker out puts, one going to the
> "C" port on the speaker switch box and the other going directly to
> speakers. On amp B I have A and B speaker outs, so on this I have the
> B speaker output connected to the B port on the speaker switchbox.
>
> When none of the speaker selector are depressed I hear audio from amp
> B on amp A, very strange.
>
> Any ideas or suggestions?
>
> Speaker Selector Box
> Amp B - Speaker Out B ------------------Input B
> Amp A - Speaker out ---+----------------Input C
> |
> +--Speakers


Either I'm really missing something or you have a configuration
that will eventually FRY your amp's outputs by pitting them
against each other. STOP USING THIS IMMEDIATELY!

Your diagram shows two inputs on your speaker selector. I assume
that they should have been labled "Output" B and "Output" C as
they are really normally used as outputs.

It sounds as though you simply want to hook the speaker selector
box in backwards from what it normally would be. E.g.:

Speaker Selector Box
Amp B - Speaker Out----------Output B
Main input--------------Speaker
Amp A - Speaker out----------Output A


The labels in the diagram would be similar to the labels on the
selector box although in reality, thier functions would be
reversed (e.g., the Output A is actually being used as an input)

This can be ok DEPENDING on characteristics of the speaker
selector box. If the box is simply a one to many type connector
with break-before-make contacts, no problem. If it is
make-before-break, it might get dicey. if it allows for multiple
speakers to be run in parrallel/series type configurations,
you'll really be in trouble so check out the actual configuration
of your switch box. Also, it would likely be a very good idea to
make sure that both amps are either off or their outputs disabled
whenever changing the speaker selection box setting.

- Jeff
July 24, 2004 3:17:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <41019C05.CED32203@earthlink.net>,
wisemanja@earthlink.net says...
>
>
> Lee J wrote:
> >
> > I'm trying to connect one set of speakers to 2 different amps,
>
> This can be ok DEPENDING on characteristics of the speaker
> selector box. If the box is simply a one to many type connector
> with break-before-make contacts, no problem. If it is
> make-before-break, it might get dicey. if it allows for multiple
> speakers to be run in parrallel/series type configurations,
> you'll really be in trouble so check out the actual configuration
> of your switch box. Also, it would likely be a very good idea to
> make sure that both amps are either off or their outputs disabled
> whenever changing the speaker selection box setting.
>
> - Jeff
>
Odds are, it almost certainly has a common negative across
all outputs, and therefor all inputs (in this case), which
will certainly cause the amps discomfort.
--
Mark

The truth as I perceive it to be.
Your perception may be different.

Triple Z is spam control.
Anonymous
July 24, 2004 12:00:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

If the 2 amplifiers are ever joined together, because of the characteristics
of the switch while it is being switched, or they do not like any transients
caused by the switch, you will have 2 blown amplifiers. This would be far
more costly to service or replace, than buying an extra set of speakers!
We've seen this one before...

--

Jerry G. GLG
==========================


"Lee J" <lee.johnston@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:D bbe5fc.0407231141.8b5e244@posting.google.com...
I'm trying to connect one set of speakers to 2 different amps, I have
a Radio Shack speaker selector. On amp A I have 2 sets of speaker
wire coming from the single sets of speaker out puts, one going to the
"C" port on the speaker switch box and the other going directly to
speakers. On amp B I have A and B speaker outs, so on this I have the
B speaker output connected to the B port on the speaker switchbox.

When none of the speaker selector are depressed I hear audio from amp
B on amp A, very strange.

Any ideas or suggestions?

Speaker Selector Box
Amp B - Speaker Out B ------------------Input B
Amp A - Speaker out ---+----------------Input C
|
+--Speakers


I hope I was clear with my setup.

Any help will be greatly appreciated

Lee
!