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Formatting and partitioning prior to loading XP?

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Anonymous
July 27, 2004 2:15:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Hi folks,

My PC components arrived today and I have built the new machine I'll
be using for multi-track recording. It seems to be running fine (touch
wood) and I've taken a look at the BIOS, which is correctly
identifying my drives (one primary master HD and a Secondary master HD
with a slaved CD-RW)

I'd appreciate some advice on setting up my hard drives... What is
necessary and/or advisable, these days, in the way of formatting and
partitioning, prior to loading Windows XP (oem, Home Edn)? Is it still
necessary to use DOS' FDISC - or does the awindows XP installation CD
do this for you? If this is the case, do I need to set my CD drive as
the boot drive in th BIOS, in order to boot from the XP CD?

My hard drives are:
Primary: SeagateBarracuda ST3120026A 120Gb 7200rpm 8mb cache (OEM)
Secondary master: Maxtor6Y080P0 Plus 9 80Gb 7200rpm 8mb cache ATA 133
(OEM)

I figure on using the Primary drive (Seagate) for
a) the OS
b) programs
c) data storage

And the Secondary drive (Maxtor) for:
Backup of the data files stored on Primary drive.

As the drives are OEM's there was no disc supplied with them and no
instructions on setting them up.

Is there any point in partitioning my drives into a number of smaller
'virtual drives?

Thanks for any guidance...

Ally
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 2:15:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
news:41058251.1546795@news.individual.net
> Hi folks,
>
> My PC components arrived today and I have built the new machine I'll
> be using for multi-track recording. It seems to be running fine (touch
> wood) and I've taken a look at the BIOS, which is correctly
> identifying my drives (one primary master HD and a Secondary master HD
> with a slaved CD-RW)
>
> I'd appreciate some advice on setting up my hard drives... What is
> necessary and/or advisable, these days, in the way of formatting and
> partitioning, prior to loading Windows XP (oem, Home Edn)? Is it still
> necessary to use DOS' FDISC -

No, windows software discs have been self-booting since no later than
Win98SE.

>or does the awindows XP installation CD do this for you?

....at your direction.

>If this is the case, do I need to set my CD drive as
> the boot drive in th BIOS, in order to boot from the XP CD?

Yes. I use the following boot order for installing XP:

CDROM
HD
FLOPPY

> My hard drives are: Primary: SeagateBarracuda ST3120026A 120Gb 7200rpm
8mb cache (OEM)
> Secondary master: Maxtor6Y080P0 Plus 9 80Gb 7200rpm 8mb cache ATA 133
> (OEM)
>
> I figure on using the Primary drive (Seagate) for
> a) the OS
> b) programs
> c) data storage
>
> And the Secondary drive (Maxtor) for:
> Backup of the data files stored on Primary drive.
>
> As the drives are OEM's there was no disc supplied with them and no
> instructions on setting them up.
>
> Is there any point in partitioning my drives into a number of smaller
> 'virtual drives?

Not in my opinion.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 4:26:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 22:15:51 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:

>
>I'd appreciate some advice on setting up my hard drives... What is
>necessary and/or advisable, these days, in the way of formatting and
>partitioning, prior to loading Windows XP (oem, Home Edn)? Is it still
>necessary to use DOS' FDISC - or does the awindows XP installation CD
>do this for you? If this is the case, do I need to set my CD drive as
>the boot drive in th BIOS, in order to boot from the XP CD?

I recommend you format NTFS, not FAT32. So DOS and FDISK won't come
into the picture. NTFS is a more robust system. And, despite
possible small theoretical differences, no-one can ever show any
practical evidence of different performance between the two systems.

Set your boot sequence as A:, CD, C:. Then you'll never have to
change it.

I've never installed XP Home. But if it's the same as XP Pro, just
put the CD in and let it do the job on a raw disk.

Did you end up with SATA drives? If so, you may have to install a
driver early in the setup process. If this is a problem, ask.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 4:26:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in
message news:ef4bg0l49j4fapkhq1eak1vu3v631dpn7o@4ax.com
> On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 22:15:51 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:
>
>>
>> I'd appreciate some advice on setting up my hard drives... What is
>> necessary and/or advisable, these days, in the way of formatting and
>> partitioning, prior to loading Windows XP (oem, Home Edn)? Is it
>> still necessary to use DOS' FDISC - or does the awindows XP
>> installation CD do this for you? If this is the case, do I need to
>> set my CD drive as the boot drive in th BIOS, in order to boot from
>> the XP CD?

> I recommend you format NTFS, not FAT32.

Agreed.

> So DOS and FDISK won't come into the picture.

Once upon a time in the dark ages, you installed NT on a FAT drive that got
converted to NTFS along the way. But you still didn't use DOS FDISK or
FORMAT.

> NTFS is a more robust system. And, despite
> possible small theoretical differences, no-one can ever show any
> practical evidence of different performance between the two systems.
>
> Set your boot sequence as A:, CD, C:. Then you'll never have to
> change it.

You should change that one right away, because it promotes booting floppies,
which is a common means for virus infection.

> I've never installed XP Home. But if it's the same as XP Pro, just
> put the CD in and let it do the job on a raw disk.

The installation procedures for the two are exceedingly similar.

> Did you end up with SATA drives? If so, you may have to install a
> driver early in the setup process. If this is a problem, ask.

Good point.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 12:21:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 00:26:18 +0100, Laurence Payne
<l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:

>>On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 22:15:51 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>I'd appreciate some advice on setting up my hard drives... What is
>>>necessary and/or advisable, these days, in the way of formatting and
>>>partitioning, prior to loading Windows XP (oem, Home Edn)? Is it still
>>>necessary to use DOS' FDISC - or does the awindows XP installation CD
>>>do this for you? If this is the case, do I need to set my CD drive as
>>>the boot drive in th BIOS, in order to boot from the XP CD?
>>
>>I recommend you format NTFS, not FAT32. So DOS and FDISK won't come
>>into the picture. NTFS is a more robust system. And, despite
>>possible small theoretical differences, no-one can ever show any
>>practical evidence of different performance between the two systems.
>>
>>Set your boot sequence as A:, CD, C:. Then you'll never have to
>>change it.

Hello, L. THanks for the help.. Can you clarify why I'd want to
specify the A drive as the first boot drive? Would I ever want to boot
from the A drive?
>>
>>I've never installed XP Home. But if it's the same as XP Pro, just
>>put the CD in and let it do the job on a raw disk.
>>
>>Did you end up with SATA drives? If so, you may have to install a
>>driver early in the setup process. If this is a problem, ask.

No, I went for an ATA setup.

Cheers,

ALly
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 8:37:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 19:55:18 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
wrote:

>You should change that one right away, because it promotes booting floppies,
>which is a common means for virus infection.
>
>> I've never installed XP Home. But if it's the same as XP Pro, just
>> put the CD in and let it do the job on a raw disk.

Maybe. The only time I put a floppy in is because I want to boot
from it. If your usage differs, indeed, recognize the danger.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 8:43:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:21:33 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:

>
>Hello, L. THanks for the help.. Can you clarify why I'd want to
>specify the A drive as the first boot drive? Would I ever want to boot
>from the A drive?

As a rule, only for rescue operations, or maybe to update firmware on
a drive, graphics card or BIOS. These operations are often run from
DOS utilities. (Before anyone says "But you can't run DOS on a
NTFS/Windows XP system", yes, of course you can. You can boot from a
DOS floppy and do some system operations despite the disk drives being
invisible).
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 8:43:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in
message news:cqtcg05qr7gn0at3023p3prhfjc0cnbcn4@4ax.com
> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:21:33 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:
>
>>
>> Hello, L. THanks for the help.. Can you clarify why I'd want to
>> specify the A drive as the first boot drive? Would I ever want to
>> boot from the A drive?
>
> As a rule, only for rescue operations, or maybe to update firmware on
> a drive, graphics card or BIOS. These operations are often run from
> DOS utilities. (Before anyone says "But you can't run DOS on a
> NTFS/Windows XP system", yes, of course you can. You can boot from a
> DOS floppy and do some system operations despite the disk drives being
> invisible).

Shhh - there are DOS and *nix utlities for inspecting NTFS drives.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Ally wrote:
> Hi folks,
>
> My PC components arrived today and I have built the new machine I'll
> be using for multi-track recording. It seems to be running fine (touch
> wood) and I've taken a look at the BIOS, which is correctly
> identifying my drives (one primary master HD and a Secondary master HD
> with a slaved CD-RW)

I'd put the CD-RW onto the channel the data drive is not on - could affect
the UMDA speed the audio drive will configure to.


> I'd appreciate some advice on setting up my hard drives... What is
> necessary and/or advisable, these days, in the way of formatting and
> partitioning, prior to loading Windows XP (oem, Home Edn)? Is it still
> necessary to use DOS' FDISC - or does the awindows XP installation CD
> do this for you? If this is the case, do I need to set my CD drive as
> the boot drive in th BIOS, in order to boot from the XP CD?

If you boot from CD you can format directly from the install. If already
formatted FAT32 (or FAT) the XP install will prompt you to convert to NTFS.
Probably the way to go these days - no 4GB filesize restriction. Definitely
do NOT use FAT.

> I figure on using the Primary drive (Seagate) for
> a) the OS
> b) programs
> c) data storage
>
> And the Secondary drive (Maxtor) for:
> Backup of the data files stored on Primary drive.

I would use the C: for OS programs and backup, and use the other drive as
data. Less chance of glitching should the pagefile or whatever be accessed
during recording, and more chance of getting clean unfragmented space.

> As the drives are OEM's there was no disc supplied with them and no
> instructions on setting them up.
>
> Is there any point in partitioning my drives into a number of smaller
> 'virtual drives?

No, unless you're anal about tidiness !
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 19:52:54 +1200, "Geoff Wood"
<geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote:

>>Ally wrote:
>>> Hi folks,
>>>
>>> My PC components arrived today and I have built the new machine I'll
>>> be using for multi-track recording. It seems to be running fine (touch
>>> wood) and I've taken a look at the BIOS, which is correctly
>>> identifying my drives (one primary master HD and a Secondary master HD
>>> with a slaved CD-RW)
>>
>>I'd put the CD-RW onto the channel the data drive is not on - could affect
>>the UMDA speed the audio drive will configure to.

Hello Geoff,
Thank you for the suggestion, but could you clarify? By "the data
drive", do you mean the first drive, ised for recording programs and
saving datsa, rather than the second drive which I'm thinking of using
for backup? In which case, that is how I have it set up already: CD-RW
slaved to second HD.

Someone else suggested having a copy of XP on each drive, so tha if
one drive dies, I can still boot from the other. That idea appeals to
me. Any comments on that?

I'm also probably going to need to run some non-recording-related
programs on the PC (MS Office, etc). Where should I install them? Not
on the same drive as the sequencer programs, I suspect...

Regards

Ally
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
news:41061bf4.3574965@news.individual.net

> Someone else suggested having a copy of XP on each drive, so tha if
> one drive dies, I can still boot from the other. That idea appeals to
> me. Any comments on that?

It can work, but it can be less than bullet-proof. It will cost you more
than a GB of disk space in most cases.

> I'm also probably going to need to run some non-recording-related
> programs on the PC (MS Office, etc). Where should I install them?

The C drive.

>Not on the same drive as the sequencer programs, I suspect...

Please distinguish between where you install a program, and where its
working files are stored. Loading a program and its components is generally
the smaller part of the I/O load associated with the use of the program, for
audio-related programs.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 21:47:00 +1200, "Geoff Wood"
<geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote:

>>Despite a previous discussion regarding c: drive access during an
>>application's session or not, I would be inclined to have my audio data
>>drive the same as the OS/pagefile drive. There is just no reason TO have
>>the active audio data on C:, if you have 2 drives. If you want backups,
>>put them on the C: drive.
>>
>>Oh yeah, and partitioning - scandisk doesn't take hat long on a 80G
>>drive.... I'd say not worth the complication.

Geoff, Thanks for expanding. I'm still not 1000% clear... assuming I
drop the idea of partitions, which of the following would be best:

Primary HD: OS, Audio programs, and backup of Audio recordings
Secondary HD: audio recording files (first instance of them, which the
audi programs save to by default).
CD slaved to Primary HD

~~OR:~~

Primary HD: OS and audio files (first instance of them, which the audi
programs save to by default).
Secondary HD: Audio programs and backup of audio recording files,
copied occasionally from the primary HD
CD-RW slaved to Secondary HD

My Abit NF7 mobo manual tells me to slave the CD-RW to the secondary
drive (or, at least, that's what the illustration shows).

Finally, which HD would serve best as the Primary:
The 120Gb SeagateBarracuda ST3120026A, 8mb cache
Or the 80Gb Maxtor 6Y080P0 Plus 9 ATA 133 ?

I guess one of these drives will be faster than the other (I don't
know which) and one will be noisier (again, I don't know which). And
one is needless-to-say bigger.

Thanks (anyone)...

Ally
PS: Thanks for the URL's on XP optimisation. Two of them seem to be
dead links, BTW.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 09:18:44 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:

>Someone else suggested having a copy of XP on each drive, so tha if
>one drive dies, I can still boot from the other. That idea appeals to
>me. Any comments on that?

Unless you want to maintain a dual-boot system, I see no point. The
stand-by Windows won't have your programs, your setup. You might as
well do a fresh install. Just keep Windows and program files on one
partition, separate from data, so this procedure is convenient.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:37:35 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
wrote:

>>"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
>>news:41061bf4.3574965@news.individual.net
>>
>>> Someone else suggested having a copy of XP on each drive, so tha if
>>> one drive dies, I can still boot from the other. That idea appeals to
>>> me. Any comments on that?
>>
>>It can work, but it can be less than bullet-proof. It will cost you more
>>than a GB of disk space in most cases.

Less than 1% of my 120gb drive... sounds worth it...

>>> I'm also probably going to need to run some non-recording-related
>>> programs on the PC (MS Office, etc). Where should I install them?
>>
>>The C drive.

Thanks...

>>>Not on the same drive as the sequencer programs, I suspect...
>>
>>Please distinguish between where you install a program, and where its
>>working files are stored. Loading a program and its components is generally
>>the smaller part of the I/O load associated with the use of the program, for
>>audio-related programs.

When you say "working files", are you referring to the actual audio
recordings - or something else?

Thanks for the help, again...
Ally
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" wrote ...
> Geoff, Thanks for expanding. I'm still not 1000% clear...
> assuming I drop the idea of partitions, which of the following
> would be best:

IMHO, partitions are overrated and of questionable benefit.
They are something like trying to guess ahead of time how
many minutes of cell-phone time you will need years into
the future.

> Primary HD: OS, Audio programs, and backup of Audio
> recordings Secondary HD: audio recording files (first
> instance of them, which the audi programs save to by default).

That is my prefered configuraiton.

> CD slaved to Primary HD

A somewhat independent decision. Much more hardware
dependent. Perhaps not as critical for audio apps as for video.

> ~~OR:~~
> Primary HD: OS and audio files (first instance of them,
> which the audi programs save to by default).

If I had two drives, I would put the media files on a different
spindle from the c:/boot/operating system/program/swap drive.

> Secondary HD: Audio programs and backup of audio recording
> files, copied occasionally from the primary HD

No practical reason to separate program files from operating
system that I am aware of. Much better to use separate drive
for primary data file storage.

> CD-RW slaved to Secondary HD

Again, a hardware issue, not a software one. Easy to
experiment to see which configuration is most efficient
with your particular combination of hardware.

> My Abit NF7 mobo manual tells me to slave the CD-RW
> to the secondary drive (or, at least, that's what the
> illustration shows).

Sounds like reasonable advice to me.

> Finally, which HD would serve best as the Primary:
> The 120Gb SeagateBarracuda ST3120026A, 8mb cache
> Or the 80Gb Maxtor 6Y080P0 Plus 9 ATA 133 ?

I'd use the smaller drive for c: (boot/os/programs/swap)
as it is plenty big enough unless you have tons of programs
to load.

> I guess one of these drives will be faster than the other
> (I don't know which)

Not clear why this is important for audio use (unless you
are doing 24 tracks or something). Even for video this is
becoming virtually a secondary issue.

> and one will be noisier (again, I don't know which).

Not clear why this is important either as they will both be
running all the time anyway.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in
message news:q0ucg0d18pqjnqg3s8hpodsqu28rpdeueg@4ax.com
> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 09:18:44 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:
>
>> Someone else suggested having a copy of XP on each drive, so tha if
>> one drive dies, I can still boot from the other. That idea appeals to
>> me. Any comments on that?
>
> Unless you want to maintain a dual-boot system, I see no point. The
> stand-by Windows won't have your programs, your setup. You might as
> well do a fresh install. Just keep Windows and program files on one
> partition, separate from data, so this procedure is convenient.

The spare XP system can be used to migrate the data off the non-booting hard
drive. For example, it can have CD or DVD burning software on it.

XP can fail to boot because of unrepaired logical errors with the NTFS file
system. It can then refuse to boot to a desktop to run CHKDSK.

One approach is the recovery console, six disks or 1 CD and an unfamiliar
procedure and environment.

Or, you can boot the spare system, run CHKDSK on what is now the non-boot
drive, and then reboot the once-failing drive.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
news:410641de.13282570@news.individual.net

> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:37:35 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
> wrote:


>>> Please distinguish between where you install a program, and where
>>> its working files are stored. Loading a program and its components
>>> is generally the smaller part of the I/O load associated with the
>>> use of the program, for audio-related programs.

> When you say "working files", are you referring to the actual audio
> recordings - or something else?

Both the actual recordings and any working files that are used to produce
them.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
news:410641de.13282570@news.individual.net...
> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:37:35 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
> wrote:
>
> >>"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
> >>news:41061bf4.3574965@news.individual.net
> >>
> >>> Someone else suggested having a copy of XP on each drive, so tha if
> >>> one drive dies, I can still boot from the other. That idea appeals to
> >>> me. Any comments on that?
> >>
> >>It can work, but it can be less than bullet-proof. It will cost you more
> >>than a GB of disk space in most cases.
>
> Less than 1% of my 120gb drive... sounds worth it...

If something happens that you can't boot from C:, your
chances of booting from an alternative hard drive seeem
<< 1% IME. Not worth it.

If you are really worried about disaster recovery (as we
all should be), make sure you have your data files backed
up. Why bother with operating system and program files
which can be easily reloaded?

> >>Please distinguish between where you install a program,
> >>and where its working files are stored. Loading a program
> >>and its components is generally the smaller part of the I/O
> >>load associated with the use of the program, for audio-
> >>related programs.
>
> When you say "working files", are you referring to the actual
> audio recordings - or something else?

In most cases, the program files themselves (exe, dll, etc.) can
be installed in the default (C:/Program Files/...) location.
I like keeping separate drives (physical, NOT "logical") for
DATA files (wav, avi, etc.) Operating system/program files/
swap file on one spindle, and data files (particularly MEDIA
data files) on separate spindle(s).
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 05:19:46 -0700, "Richard Crowley"
<rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote:

>>"Ally" wrote ...
>>> Geoff, Thanks for expanding. I'm still not 1000% clear...
>>> assuming I drop the idea of partitions, which of the following
>>> would be best:
>>
>>IMHO, partitions are overrated and of questionable benefit.
>>They are something like trying to guess ahead of time how
>>many minutes of cell-phone time you will need years into
>>the future.
>>
>>> Primary HD: OS, Audio programs, and backup of Audio
>>> recordings Secondary HD: audio recording files (first
>>> instance of them, which the audi programs save to by default).
>>
>>That is my prefered configuraiton.
>>
>>> CD slaved to Primary HD
>>
>>A somewhat independent decision. Much more hardware
>>dependent. Perhaps not as critical for audio apps as for video.
>>
>>> ~~OR:~~
>>> Primary HD: OS and audio files (first instance of them,
>>> which the audi programs save to by default).
>>
>>If I had two drives, I would put the media files on a different
>>spindle from the c:/boot/operating system/program/swap drive.
>>
>>> Secondary HD: Audio programs and backup of audio recording
>>> files, copied occasionally from the primary HD
>>
>>No practical reason to separate program files from operating
>>system that I am aware of. Much better to use separate drive
>>for primary data file storage.
>>
>>> CD-RW slaved to Secondary HD
>>
>>Again, a hardware issue, not a software one. Easy to
>>experiment to see which configuration is most efficient
>>with your particular combination of hardware.
>>
>>> My Abit NF7 mobo manual tells me to slave the CD-RW
>>> to the secondary drive (or, at least, that's what the
>>> illustration shows).
>>
>>Sounds like reasonable advice to me.
>>
>>> Finally, which HD would serve best as the Primary:
>>> The 120Gb SeagateBarracuda ST3120026A, 8mb cache
>>> Or the 80Gb Maxtor 6Y080P0 Plus 9 ATA 133 ?
>>
>>I'd use the smaller drive for c: (boot/os/programs/swap)
>>as it is plenty big enough unless you have tons of programs
>>to load.
>>
>>> I guess one of these drives will be faster than the other
>>> (I don't know which)
>>
>>Not clear why this is important for audio use (unless you
>>are doing 24 tracks or something). Even for video this is
>>becoming virtually a secondary issue.
>>
>>> and one will be noisier (again, I don't know which).
>>
>>Not clear why this is important either as they will both be
>>running all the time anyway.


Richard,
Thanks for clarifying some of those points. If you have the
inclination, please comment on my reply to you other response where I
explain my perceived logic for having the biggest drive as the
primary.

Anyone suggest an easy way to assess which of two drives is fastest?
(Of course, experience would tell, but so far All I have on each drive
is a copy of XP)

Thanks,

Ally
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:52:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 05:02:30 -0700, "Richard Crowley"
<rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote:

>>
>>"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
>>news:410641de.13282570@news.individual.net...
>>> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:37:35 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> >>"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
>>> >>news:41061bf4.3574965@news.individual.net
>>> >>
>>> >>> Someone else suggested having a copy of XP on each drive, so tha if
>>> >>> one drive dies, I can still boot from the other. That idea appeals to
>>> >>> me. Any comments on that?
>>> >>
>>> >>It can work, but it can be less than bullet-proof. It will cost you more
>>> >>than a GB of disk space in most cases.
>>>
>>> Less than 1% of my 120gb drive... sounds worth it...
>>
>>If something happens that you can't boot from C:, your
>>chances of booting from an alternative hard drive seeem
>><< 1% IME. Not worth it.
>>
>>If you are really worried about disaster recovery (as we
>>all should be), make sure you have your data files backed
>>up. Why bother with operating system and program files
>>which can be easily reloaded?

Hi Richard. Thanks for your input. Yes, I do intend to backup
religiously, .....onto my other hard drive.

Mow, suppose my primary drive goes west one day...

Then I still have a copy of all my precious audio files on the other
drive. But suppose that drive is almost full.. Then I would have no
room to install XP on that drive. So doesn't it therefore make good
sense to aleady have a copy of XP on that final remaining drive?
(opinions strongly invited!)

>>In most cases, the program files themselves (exe, dll, etc.) can
>>be installed in the default (C:/Program Files/...) location.
>>I like keeping separate drives (physical, NOT "logical") for
>>DATA files (wav, avi, etc.) Operating system/program files/
>>swap file on one spindle, and data files (particularly MEDIA
>>data files) on separate spindle(s).

Yes, this I am learning - thanks...

Ally
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:53:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" wrote ...
> Hi Richard. Thanks for your input. Yes, I do intend to backup
> religiously, .....onto my other hard drive.
>
> Mow, suppose my primary drive goes west one day...
>
> Then I still have a copy of all my precious audio files on the other
> drive. But suppose that drive is almost full.. Then I would have no
> room to install XP on that drive. So doesn't it therefore make good
> sense to aleady have a copy of XP on that final remaining drive?
> (opinions strongly invited!)

Hard drives are remarkably cheap and getting even cheaper
(per GB) every week. You would be replacing your failed
primary/secondary drive, no?
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:53:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 05:29:36 -0700, "Richard Crowley"
<rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote:

>>"Ally" wrote ...
>>> Hi Richard. Thanks for your input. Yes, I do intend to backup
>>> religiously, .....onto my other hard drive.
>>>
>>> Mow, suppose my primary drive goes west one day...
>>>
>>> Then I still have a copy of all my precious audio files on the other
>>> drive. But suppose that drive is almost full.. Then I would have no
>>> room to install XP on that drive. So doesn't it therefore make good
>>> sense to aleady have a copy of XP on that final remaining drive?
>>> (opinions strongly invited!)
>>
>>Hard drives are remarkably cheap and getting even cheaper
>>(per GB) every week. You would be replacing your failed
>>primary/secondary drive, no?

Good point. ..but it usually takes a day or two to obtain a new drive
by mail order. A day or two of down-time could be a disaster..

Ally
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:53:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
news:41065fcd.4675058@news.individual.net...
> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 05:29:36 -0700, "Richard Crowley"
> <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote:
>
> >>"Ally" wrote ...
> >>> Hi Richard. Thanks for your input. Yes, I do intend to backup
> >>> religiously, .....onto my other hard drive.
> >>>
> >>> Mow, suppose my primary drive goes west one day...
> >>>
> >>> Then I still have a copy of all my precious audio files on the other
> >>> drive. But suppose that drive is almost full.. Then I would have no
> >>> room to install XP on that drive. So doesn't it therefore make good
> >>> sense to aleady have a copy of XP on that final remaining drive?
> >>> (opinions strongly invited!)
> >>
> >>Hard drives are remarkably cheap and getting even cheaper
> >>(per GB) every week. You would be replacing your failed
> >>primary/secondary drive, no?
>
> Good point. ..but it usually takes a day or two to obtain a new drive
> by mail order. A day or two of down-time could be a disaster..
>
> Ally
>
If a day or two of down-time is disaster, you should just have a secondary
drive already that's ready to go in on a moments notice. Get everything you
need on your primary drive and then ghost the image of that drive onto a
backup drive. If the primary drive fails, you can just open up the case,
and switch the power and ribbon cables and you're back up and running. I'd
suggest RAID but it seems as if you're trying to run a skeleton system.
Heck, you could get a small drive that would only hold your OS and programs
until a replacement is available, it doesn't have to be a 200GB drive.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:53:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 14:47:21 GMT, "Bruce Chang"
<bechang@swspambegonebell.net> wrote:

>>Heck, you could get a small drive that would only hold your OS and programs
>>until a replacement is available, it doesn't have to be a 200GB drive.

Bruce,
This sounds like a great idea. Thank you for that!

Ally
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:58:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Laurence Payne wrote:
..
>
> Set your boot sequence as A:, CD, C:. Then you'll never have to
> change it.

With A: first you'll continually be inadvertently trying to boot from
floppies which you've left in. If you are formnatting NTFS, there is NO
POINT in the system ever trying to boot from floppy, 'cos there is no such
thing as an XP boot floppy, and with a FAT floppy you can't see the NTFS
volume anyway. (there actually are utilities to access an NTFS volumes from
DOS/Win16, but these are for when you are in deep deep poo).

geoff
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:58:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Geoff Wood" <geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote in message
news:xWnNc.621$zS6.84227@news02.tsnz.net
> Laurence Payne wrote:
> .
>>
>> Set your boot sequence as A:, CD, C:. Then you'll never have to
>> change it.
>
> With A: first you'll continually be inadvertently trying to boot from
> floppies which you've left in. If you are formatting NTFS, there is
> NO POINT in the system ever trying to boot from floppy, 'cos there is
> no such thing as an XP boot floppy, and with a FAT floppy you can't
> see the NTFS volume anyway. (there actually are utilities to access
> an NTFS volumes from DOS/Win16, but these are for when you are in
> deep deep poo).

Actually, there are still XP boot floppies, a set of 6 to be exact.

http://www.wown.com/j_helmig/wxprcons.htm

"If you have a Windows XP Recovery CD-ROM, then you may not have the option
to select "Recovery Console".
For such cases, Microsoft have made the Windows XP setup process (to get to
the Recovery Console) available as
a download via Q310994 in different languages (note: there are different
downloads for the Home and Professional Edition).
You have to execute the download file, which will create 6 boot floppies.
You then can boot from the first floppy :
You will get first the message : "Setup is inspecting your computer's
hardware configuration..."


These XP boot XP floppies can be used to do all sorts of bizarre things,
including building an XP system with FDISK and FORMAT. But, lets not go
there...
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:58:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 19:58:07 +1200, "Geoff Wood"
<geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote:

>
>With A: first you'll continually be inadvertently trying to boot from
>floppies which you've left in. If you are formnatting NTFS, there is NO
>POINT in the system ever trying to boot from floppy, 'cos there is no such
>thing as an XP boot floppy

Oh yes there is! Except there are 6 of them :-)
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:58:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:34:54 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
wrote:

>>"Geoff Wood" <geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote in message
>>news:xWnNc.621$zS6.84227@news02.tsnz.net
>>> Laurence Payne wrote:
>>> .
>>>>
>>>> Set your boot sequence as A:, CD, C:. Then you'll never have to
>>>> change it.
>>>
>>> With A: first you'll continually be inadvertently trying to boot from
>>> floppies which you've left in. If you are formatting NTFS, there is
>>> NO POINT in the system ever trying to boot from floppy, 'cos there is
>>> no such thing as an XP boot floppy, and with a FAT floppy you can't
>>> see the NTFS volume anyway. (there actually are utilities to access
>>> an NTFS volumes from DOS/Win16, but these are for when you are in
>>> deep deep poo).
>>
>>Actually, there are still XP boot floppies, a set of 6 to be exact.

But why would anyone want to boot from floppies?

Ally
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:58:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
news:410642d2.13526385@news.individual.net
> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:34:54 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
> wrote:
>
>>> "Geoff Wood" <geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote in message
>>> news:xWnNc.621$zS6.84227@news02.tsnz.net
>>>> Laurence Payne wrote:
>>>> .
>>>>>
>>>>> Set your boot sequence as A:, CD, C:. Then you'll never have
>>>>> to change it.
>>>>
>>>> With A: first you'll continually be inadvertently trying to boot
>>>> from floppies which you've left in. If you are formatting NTFS,
>>>> there is NO POINT in the system ever trying to boot from floppy,
>>>> 'cos there is no such thing as an XP boot floppy, and with a FAT
>>>> floppy you can't see the NTFS volume anyway. (there actually are
>>>> utilities to access an NTFS volumes from DOS/Win16, but these are
>>>> for when you are in deep deep poo).
>>>
>>> Actually, there are still XP boot floppies, a set of 6 to be exact.

> But why would anyone want to boot from floppies?

Bail yourself out, when you are in deep yogurt.
Anonymous
July 27, 2004 11:58:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" <Ally888@nospamxyz.com> wrote in message
news:410642d2.13526385@news.individual.net...
> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:34:54 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
> wrote:

> >>Actually, there are still XP boot floppies, a set of 6 to be exact.
>
> But why would anyone want to boot from floppies?

It will be crystal clear when you get there.
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 12:00:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Ally, do feel free to join the PCDAW email list if you feel inclined.
mailto:o LCDAW-subscribe@yahoogroups.com (spam and address-miner filtered
!).

geoff
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 12:00:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 20:00:14 +1200, "Geoff Wood"
<geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote:

>>Ally, do feel free to join the PCDAW email list if you feel inclined.
>>mailto:o LCDAW-subscribe@yahoogroups.com (spam and address-miner filtered
>>!).
>>
>>geoff

I may well do that - thanks for the tip.

BTW, if you have unpartitioned drives, doesn't that mean it'll take
ages for Scandisc to run? Isn't that one of the best reasons for
partitioning a drive? Then you haven't got to scandisc the whole
drive; just the relevant partition(s), yes?

Ally
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:15:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 07:34:54 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
wrote:

>Actually, there are still XP boot floppies, a set of 6 to be exact.
>
>http://www.wown.com/j_helmig/wxprcons.htm
>
>"If you have a Windows XP Recovery CD-ROM, then you may not have the option
>to select "Recovery Console".
>For such cases, Microsoft have made the Windows XP setup process (to get to
>the Recovery Console) available as
>a download via Q310994 in different languages (note: there are different
>downloads for the Home and Professional Edition).
>You have to execute the download file, which will create 6 boot floppies.
>You then can boot from the first floppy :
>You will get first the message : "Setup is inspecting your computer's
>hardware configuration..."
>
>
>These XP boot XP floppies can be used to do all sorts of bizarre things,
>including building an XP system with FDISK and FORMAT. But, lets not go
>there...

Sometimes you have to :-)
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:21:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 11:51:06 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:

>Primary HD: OS, Audio programs, and backup of Audio recordings
>Secondary HD: audio recording files (first instance of them, which the
>audi programs save to by default).
>CD slaved to Primary HD
>
>~~OR:~~
>
>Primary HD: OS and audio files (first instance of them, which the audi
>programs save to by default).
>Secondary HD: Audio programs and backup of audio recording files,
>copied occasionally from the primary HD
>CD-RW slaved to Secondary HD


There is no possible reason to have program files on a different
drive/partition to the os. Windows, the Registry and program files
are intimately entwined. Keep them together.

Backup data can go anywhere there's space for them. They're just
sitting there.

There's a small argument for having a CD-RW drive on a different IDE
bus to the disk containing data to be written. But only a small one.
In practice, which IDE cable reaches to the CD drive is often the
overriding consideration :-)
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:22:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 11:58:07 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:

>>>
>>>Actually, there are still XP boot floppies, a set of 6 to be exact.
>
>But why would anyone want to boot from floppies?

When things go wrong.
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:23:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:01:40 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
wrote:

>> When you say "working files", are you referring to the actual audio
>> recordings - or something else?
>
>Both the actual recordings and any working files that are used to produce
>them.

Meaning just what? I know of no audio recorder/sequencer that
doesn't load the control file into memory and keep it there. Do you?
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:23:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in
message news:gshdg0hgf3j0as85i0ji33qdftcfndn6in@4ax.com
> On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 08:01:40 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
> wrote:
>
>>> When you say "working files", are you referring to the actual audio
>>> recordings - or something else?
>>
>> Both the actual recordings and any working files that are used to
>> produce them.
>
> Meaning just what? I know of no audio recorder/sequencer that
> doesn't load the control file into memory and keep it there. Do you?

Audition writes to the temp file on disk incessantly while it is recording.
When you save the track files, there is a file-file copy from the temp file
to the track files. It reads and writes to disk, often as fast as the disc
will run, while editing in edit view. MT view's nondestructive editing
minimizes pounding on the hard drive, but you still end up playing back the
track files concurrently. The only file that I know of that is reasonably
small and doesn't get pounded is the .ses file.
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:27:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 12:34:31 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:

>Then I still have a copy of all my precious audio files on the other
>drive. But suppose that drive is almost full.. Then I would have no
>room to install XP on that drive. So doesn't it therefore make good
>sense to aleady have a copy of XP on that final remaining drive?
>(opinions strongly invited!)

Not really. That copy wouldn't have your programs installed. If you
feel you might WANT to install XP on that drive, leave space.

In the situation you describe, you'd go out, buy a new drive and
install XP and your programs. An afternoon's work. It's not as if
you're doing this for a living and down-time costs money, after all
:-)
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:27:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 22:27:32 +0100, Laurence Payne
<l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:

>>On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 12:34:31 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:
>>
>>>Then I still have a copy of all my precious audio files on the other
>>>drive. But suppose that drive is almost full.. Then I would have no
>>>room to install XP on that drive. So doesn't it therefore make good
>>>sense to aleady have a copy of XP on that final remaining drive?
>>>(opinions strongly invited!)
>>
>>Not really. That copy wouldn't have your programs installed. If you
>>feel you might WANT to install XP on that drive, leave space.
>>
>>In the situation you describe, you'd go out, buy a new drive and
>>install XP and your programs. An afternoon's work. It's not as if
>>you're doing this for a living and down-time costs money, after all
>>:-)

My time is worth just as much money, whether I'm fixing my business
computer or my DAW. See what I mean?

Ally
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:27:33 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 22:27:32 +0100, Laurence Payne
<l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:

>>On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 12:34:31 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:
>>
>>>Then I still have a copy of all my precious audio files on the other
>>>drive. But suppose that drive is almost full.. Then I would have no
>>>room to install XP on that drive. So doesn't it therefore make good
>>>sense to aleady have a copy of XP on that final remaining drive?
>>>(opinions strongly invited!)
>>
>>Not really. That copy wouldn't have your programs installed. If you
>>feel you might WANT to install XP on that drive, leave space.
>>
>>In the situation you describe, you'd go out, buy a new drive and
>>install XP and your programs. An afternoon's work. It's not as if
>>you're doing this for a living and down-time costs money, after all
>>:-)

I'll tell you something though... I have loaded WIn XP onto both hard
drives and it is proving a bit of a pain. When you boot up, the bios
promts you top select which OS you want to start:
Windows Xp or... Windows XP... It doesn't indicate which drive each
one is on. Si I'm thinking of deleting the version of Win XP that's
on my secondary HD. Not sure how straightforward that is to do...

Ally
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:29:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 14:02:11 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:

>>>Hard drives are remarkably cheap and getting even cheaper
>>>(per GB) every week. You would be replacing your failed
>>>primary/secondary drive, no?
>
>Good point. ..but it usually takes a day or two to obtain a new drive
>by mail order. A day or two of down-time could be a disaster..

Why? Who's the big client breathing down your neck? :=)

So install XP on the other drive, carry on working and copy data onto
the new drive when it arrives.
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:30:30 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 15:29:25 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:

>>>Heck, you could get a small drive that would only hold your OS and programs
>>>until a replacement is available, it doesn't have to be a 200GB drive.
>
>Bruce,
>This sounds like a great idea. Thank you for that!

This small one would take as long to arrive as the bigger one, surely?
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:30:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 22:30:30 +0100, Laurence Payne
<l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:

>>On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 15:29:25 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:
>>
>>>>>Heck, you could get a small drive that would only hold your OS and programs
>>>>>until a replacement is available, it doesn't have to be a 200GB drive.
>>>
>>>Bruce,
>>>This sounds like a great idea. Thank you for that!
>>
>>This small one would take as long to arrive as the bigger one, surely?

L, I think Bruce means I could buy a drive now to have in store for
use in emergency, already loaded with Win XP.

Ally
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:53:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" wrote ...
> Good point. ..but it usually takes a day or two to obtain a new drive
> by mail order. A day or two of down-time could be a disaster..

If your downtme is really worth that much, then a hot standby
spare hard drive is easily justified.
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 2:57:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" wrote ...
> Thanks for clarifying some of those points. If you have the
> inclination, please comment on my reply to you other response
> where I explain my perceived logic for having the biggest
> drive as the primary.

If I can find it.

> Anyone suggest an easy way to assess which of two drives
> is fastest? (Of course, experience would tell, but so far All
> I have on each drive is a copy of XP)

What are you doing that requires that kind of speed? I do
almost more video than audio nowadays and even for video,
(DV @ 250Mb/min) its not a particularly important issue.
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 3:08:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ally" wrote ...
> Mow, suppose my primary drive goes west one day...
>
> Then I still have a copy of all my precious audio files
> on the other drive. But suppose that drive is almost full..
> Then I would have no room to install XP on that drive.
> So doesn't it therefore make good sense to aleady have a
> copy of XP on that final remaining drive?
> (opinions strongly invited!)

No offense, but I don't think you have enough experience to
predict that is even a workable scheme. I've been building
computers since well before the IBM PC or Apple(1) and
producing and editing audio and video even longer. Your
scheme doesn't sound practical to me, particularly in the
absense of any actual use-experience or revelation of what
software app(s) you intend to use.

If your remaining drive is that tight, you won't have enough
room (for temp files, etc.) to do any practial work on it anyway.
Are you actually in business doing audio editing that downtime
is so dear? If so, you might want to reconsider your business
plan.
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 3:23:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 22:03:25 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:

>I'll tell you something though... I have loaded WIn XP onto both hard
>drives and it is proving a bit of a pain. When you boot up, the bios
>promts you top select which OS you want to start:
>Windows Xp or... Windows XP... It doesn't indicate which drive each
>one is on. Si I'm thinking of deleting the version of Win XP that's
>on my secondary HD. Not sure how straightforward that is to do...

Edit boot.ini in the root directory of your primary drive. You can
give the two boots meaningful names.


If you want to lose the second installation (and you might as well),
just delete the Windows folder from that drive. Might as well delete
everything - there's nothing else there yet, is there? You'll still
get the choice, until you edit boot.ini.
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 3:26:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 27 Jul 2004 21:58:06 GMT, Ally888@nospamxyz.com (Ally) wrote:

>>>In the situation you describe, you'd go out, buy a new drive and
>>>install XP and your programs. An afternoon's work. It's not as if
>>>you're doing this for a living and down-time costs money, after all
>>>:-)
>
>My time is worth just as much money, whether I'm fixing my business
>computer or my DAW. See what I mean?

No, I don't :-) Hobby time isn't chargeable.

Anyway, you'll have to spend time setting up a second copy of Windows
whether you do it now or later. I suggest you do it later, when (if)
needed. You're still very much on the learning curve. Make your
mistakes now on one Windows installation, not identical mistakes on
two copies :-)
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 4:39:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Geoff Wood wrote:
> application's session or not, I would be inclined to have my audio
> data drive the same as the OS/pagefile drive.


Ooops " WOULD NOT" !!!

geoff
Anonymous
July 28, 2004 4:39:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 00:39:12 +1200, "Geoff Wood"
<geoff@paf.co.nz-nospam> wrote:

>>Geoff Wood wrote:
>>> application's session or not, I would be inclined to have my audio
>>> data drive the same as the OS/pagefile drive.
>>
>>
>>Ooops " WOULD NOT" !!!

I was 90% sure that was what you meant... :-)

Ally
!