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Transfer Speeds

Last response: in Home Theatre Legacy
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Anonymous
July 21, 2005 3:43:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

Since a person sending a show is likely to do so at less than 384K speed
(typical 5MB cable modem upload speed), and since a receiver with a
similar connection has the ability to receive at up to 5MB, is it likely
that receiving two transfers at once from two different senders would
slow the receiving of the transfers? It would seem to me that they would
not, but I'm not that familiar with the process.

More about : transfer speeds

Anonymous
July 21, 2005 3:43:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 11:43:11 GMT, mcp6453 <mcp6453@earthlink.net>
wrote:

>Since a person sending a show is likely to do so at less than 384K speed
>(typical 5MB cable modem upload speed), and since a receiver with a
>similar connection has the ability to receive at up to 5MB, is it likely
>that receiving two transfers at once from two different senders would
>slow the receiving of the transfers? It would seem to me that they would
>not, but I'm not that familiar with the process.

It shouldn't. While downloading requires some upload bandwidth because
of the acknowlengements, it would be the recipient's bandwidth, not
the sender's.

However, there's a problem. The Replay requires a port to receive
shows, and there's only one. The other sender would have nothing to
connect to. Of course, you could still have 2 transfers if you had 2
different Replays.

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"The idea that there is an invisible being who
created and still runs this old universe is so
childish, so obviously contrived, that it is hard to
believe anyone with even a modicum of education can
still fall for that scam."
July 21, 2005 8:26:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

Mark Lloyd wrote:

> However, there's a problem. The Replay requires a port to receive
> shows, and there's only one. The other sender would have nothing to
> connect to. Of course, you could still have 2 transfers if you had 2
> different Replays.

No, the inbound port is only used for negotating the initial connection;
after the connection is set up, the connection moves over to a temporary
port. Firewalls know how handle this automatically, and allow the
transfer to happen on a different port.

If this wasn't the case, an FTP server behind a firewall would only be
able to serve files to one user a time. Not very useful.

I've had multiple transfers going on simulatenously, and they work fine.
Related resources
Anonymous
July 21, 2005 8:26:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 16:26:10 GMT, ST <tringali@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Mark Lloyd wrote:
>
>> However, there's a problem. The Replay requires a port to receive
>> shows, and there's only one. The other sender would have nothing to
>> connect to. Of course, you could still have 2 transfers if you had 2
>> different Replays.
>
>No, the inbound port is only used for negotating the initial connection;
>after the connection is set up, the connection moves over to a temporary
>port. Firewalls know how handle this automatically, and allow the
>transfer to happen on a different port.
>

It seems very unlikely tha my router is forwarding additional prots
like that. I think you're confusing incoming and outgoing, see below.

When a network connection is made, one device (usually called
"client", but with a few exceptions such as the data connection in
non-passive mode FTP) makes a connection from one of it's own ports to
a certain port on the other (server) machine. It's this destination
port that people usually mean.

>If this wasn't the case, an FTP server behind a firewall would only be
>able to serve files to one user a time. Not very useful.
>

I have set up such FTP servers. You may be describing "passive mode",
which requires a range of ports to be forwarded to the server.

There is no such thing with the Replay. Possibly, what you mean is
that once the transfer connection is started, the Replay itself is
opening such a connection. This would be clearer if you memtioned the
difference between INCOMING and OUTGOING connections. The only
INCOMING connections the Replay accepts (from the internet) are one
one particular port (often 29000).

>I've had multiple transfers going on simulatenously, and they work fine.

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"The idea that there is an invisible being who
created and still runs this old universe is so
childish, so obviously contrived, that it is hard to
believe anyone with even a modicum of education can
still fall for that scam."
Anonymous
July 22, 2005 1:31:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

Mark Lloyd wrote:
> On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 16:26:10 GMT, ST <tringali@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Mark Lloyd wrote:
>>
>>
>>>However, there's a problem. The Replay requires a port to receive
>>>shows, and there's only one. The other sender would have nothing to
>>>connect to. Of course, you could still have 2 transfers if you had 2
>>>different Replays.
>>
>>No, the inbound port is only used for negotating the initial connection;
>>after the connection is set up, the connection moves over to a temporary
>>port. Firewalls know how handle this automatically, and allow the
>>transfer to happen on a different port.
>>
>
>
> It seems very unlikely tha my router is forwarding additional prots
> like that. I think you're confusing incoming and outgoing, see below.
>
> When a network connection is made, one device (usually called
> "client", but with a few exceptions such as the data connection in
> non-passive mode FTP) makes a connection from one of it's own ports to
> a certain port on the other (server) machine. It's this destination
> port that people usually mean.
>
>
>>If this wasn't the case, an FTP server behind a firewall would only be
>>able to serve files to one user a time. Not very useful.
>>
>
>
> I have set up such FTP servers. You may be describing "passive mode",
> which requires a range of ports to be forwarded to the server.
>
> There is no such thing with the Replay. Possibly, what you mean is
> that once the transfer connection is started, the Replay itself is
> opening such a connection. This would be clearer if you memtioned the
> difference between INCOMING and OUTGOING connections. The only
> INCOMING connections the Replay accepts (from the internet) are one
> one particular port (often 29000).
>
>
>>I've had multiple transfers going on simulatenously, and they work fine.
>
>


I am transferring (inbound) and it is very slow going -- a one-hour show
at standard speed has been transferring since 7PM EST last night. It's
only up to 64%. I am hesitant to mess with it, but there is a second
show that I want to receive, as well.
Anonymous
July 22, 2005 1:31:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

> I am transferring (inbound) and it is very slow going -- a one-hour show
> at standard speed has been transferring since 7PM EST last night. It's
> only up to 64%. I am hesitant to mess with it, but there is a second
> show that I want to receive, as well.

The speed is determined by the slower of the uploader/downloader. What's
the problem? Just accept the second show and it will be queued for
download. If you then pause the 1st one, the 2nd will download. Of
course, the first sender won't be too thrilled.
Anonymous
July 22, 2005 1:31:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.replaytv (More info?)

On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 21:31:07 GMT, mcp6453 <mcp6453@earthlink.net>
wrote:

>Mark Lloyd wrote:
>> On Thu, 21 Jul 2005 16:26:10 GMT, ST <tringali@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Mark Lloyd wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>However, there's a problem. The Replay requires a port to receive
>>>>shows, and there's only one. The other sender would have nothing to
>>>>connect to. Of course, you could still have 2 transfers if you had 2
>>>>different Replays.
>>>
>>>No, the inbound port is only used for negotating the initial connection;
>>>after the connection is set up, the connection moves over to a temporary
>>>port. Firewalls know how handle this automatically, and allow the
>>>transfer to happen on a different port.
>>>
>>
>>
>> It seems very unlikely tha my router is forwarding additional prots
>> like that. I think you're confusing incoming and outgoing, see below.
>>
>> When a network connection is made, one device (usually called
>> "client", but with a few exceptions such as the data connection in
>> non-passive mode FTP) makes a connection from one of it's own ports to
>> a certain port on the other (server) machine. It's this destination
>> port that people usually mean.
>>
>>
>>>If this wasn't the case, an FTP server behind a firewall would only be
>>>able to serve files to one user a time. Not very useful.
>>>
>>
>>
>> I have set up such FTP servers. You may be describing "passive mode",
>> which requires a range of ports to be forwarded to the server.
>>
>> There is no such thing with the Replay. Possibly, what you mean is
>> that once the transfer connection is started, the Replay itself is
>> opening such a connection. This would be clearer if you memtioned the
>> difference between INCOMING and OUTGOING connections. The only
>> INCOMING connections the Replay accepts (from the internet) are one
>> one particular port (often 29000).
>>
>>
>>>I've had multiple transfers going on simulatenously, and they work fine.
>>
>>
>
>
>I am transferring (inbound) and it is very slow going -- a one-hour show
>at standard speed has been transferring since 7PM EST last night. It's
>only up to 64%. I am hesitant to mess with it, but there is a second
>show that I want to receive, as well.

The transfer speed will be determined by the lower of your download
speed and the sender/s upload speed (usually, it'll be the sender's
upload speed, since most internet connections have lower upload
speeds).

Replay video files are very large. For example, a 1-hour show at
Standard is about 850MB (that's 6.64Gb). Note that Medium makes the
file about twice as large.

At the (common) upload speed of 128Kbps (that's 16KBps), this would
take 8.64Gb / 128Ks or 70,779 seconds. That's 19.7 HOURS. It can be
expected to take longer with the usual overhead of an internet
connection, as well as anything else you're using it for during that
time.

I can remember wanting an episode of Enterprise (when a local station
messed up). I got it from a newsgroup. It that time I had 1Mbps
download, and was watching that before a IVS transfer could even get
to 20%.

The pther poster said it would work to receive shows from different
senders at once. I've never tried that (I have SENT to 2 people at
once).

--
Mark Lloyd
has a Replay 5xxx
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com

"The idea that there is an invisible being who
created and still runs this old universe is so
childish, so obviously contrived, that it is hard to
believe anyone with even a modicum of education can
still fall for that scam."
!