Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Guys help me.Some questions about Graphics card

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
February 18, 2013 8:54:49 AM

I search internet and fail to get any satisfied answer.So can u tell me what is
memory clock
engine clock
memory bandwidth
stream processor
texture unit
Z/Stencil ROP Units
Color ROP Units
Dual geometry and dual rendering engines
shader clock speed
Order-independent transparency
HDR texture compression
anti-aliasing
Morphological Anti-Aliasing (MLAA)
128 bit bus bandwidth
Thanksssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss
a b U Graphics card
February 18, 2013 9:15:44 AM

>Memory Clock
Speed of GPU's memory. In MHz.
>Memory Bandwidth
How much memory GPU has. Like 1GB, 2GB and etc.
>Stream Processor
>Texture Unit
>Z/Stencil ROP Units
>Color ROP Units
>Dual geometry and dual rendering engines
All of these cache and render graphics, they do same things, but on different levels. Don't bother, really.
>Shader Clock Speed
How fast your GPU's "shader effects"-rendering blocks work. Shaders are basically what determines visual depth and quality of the end picture you get. They generate all shadows that you see in the game, including most overtones, like when source lighting changes and shadows on characters/objects change too. The higher are the level of shader effects used in the game, the better graphics can be done. "Bump Mapping", for example, is one of the simplest types of shader effect - it makes so that absolutely flat object (like a wall, or stone road) can look like it's actually has depth (like if there's not just flat texture of a brick wall, but if like that said wall is made of each individual, separate brick, and they all are 3D, it's basically a trick to fool the eyes).
>Order-independent Transparency
It works for glass objects mostly, it renders windows, bottles and other object's textures so that you can look through them and see other objects. For example, if there's a very thin cloth through which you try to see some other objects, you wouldn't be able to see anything if this trick won't be applied. It basically makes things naturally see-through, like in real life. Well, at least it TRIES to do that... :\
>HDR texture compression
By default HDR textures weight a ton in their raw state, this makes so that these high-quality textures can be used in a much smaller size without loosing quality. It helps a lot for games and 3D-presentational stuff.
>Anti-Aliasing
What it does, is basically tries to smoother all the "rough edges" in corners of things and etc. For example, if you play a video game on a very low resolution while using a high resolution monitor, you will immediately see that some places have something like "little stairs" in places of curved lines, Z-lines and etc.
Anti-aliasing tries to fix that by smoothing each edge and draw near pixes such way so that the picture looks like it's absolutely "stair"-free (which, of course, isn't, it's just another trick to fool our eyes).
>Morphological Anti-Aliasing (MLAA)
Just another type of Anti-Aliasing.
>128-Bit Bus Bandwidth
The maximum size of your GPU's memory bus, it goes into unison with "memory clock". It basically shows how much bits of data your GPU's chip can run through the memory lane at one time. The more, the faster will be rendering of areas/textures/models, in shorter time.


P.S. If I made some mistakes there, I'm sincerely sorry. Somebody fix me if I'm wrong there somewhere. I read that info long ago and I don't remember everything accurately.
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
February 18, 2013 8:39:10 PM

master_chen said:
>Memory Clock
Speed of GPU's memory. In MHz.
>Memory Bandwidth
How much memory GPU has. Like 1GB, 2GB and etc.
>Stream Processor
>Texture Unit
>Z/Stencil ROP Units
>Color ROP Units
>Dual geometry and dual rendering engines
All of these cache and render graphics, they do same things, but on different levels. Don't bother, really.
>Shader Clock Speed
How fast your GPU's "shader effects"-rendering blocks work. Shaders are basically what determines visual depth and quality of the end picture you get. They generate all shadows that you see in the game, including most overtones, like when source lighting changes and shadows on characters/objects change too. The higher are the level of shader effects used in the game, the better graphics can be done. "Bump Mapping", for example, is one of the simplest types of shader effect - it makes so that absolutely flat object (like a wall, or stone road) can look like it's actually has depth (like if there's not just flat texture of a brick wall, but if like that said wall is made of each individual, separate brick, and they all are 3D, it's basically a trick to fool the eyes).
>Order-independent Transparency
It works for glass objects mostly, it renders windows, bottles and other object's textures so that you can look through them and see other objects. For example, if there's a very thin cloth through which you try to see some other objects, you wouldn't be able to see anything if this trick won't be applied. It basically makes things naturally see-through, like in real life. Well, at least it TRIES to do that... :\
>HDR texture compression
By default HDR textures weight a ton in their raw state, this makes so that these high-quality textures can be used in a much smaller size without loosing quality. It helps a lot for games and 3D-presentational stuff.
>Anti-Aliasing
What it does, is basically tries to smoother all the "rough edges" in corners of things and etc. For example, if you play a video game on a very low resolution while using a high resolution monitor, you will immediately see that some places have something like "little stairs" in places of curved lines, Z-lines and etc.
Anti-aliasing tries to fix that by smoothing each edge and draw near pixes such way so that the picture looks like it's absolutely "stair"-free (which, of course, isn't, it's just another trick to fool our eyes).
>Morphological Anti-Aliasing (MLAA)
Just another type of Anti-Aliasing.
>128-Bit Bus Bandwidth
The maximum size of your GPU's memory bus, it goes into unison with "memory clock". It basically shows how much bits of data your GPU's chip can run through the memory lane at one time. The more, the faster will be rendering of areas/textures/models, in shorter time.


P.S. If I made some mistakes there, I'm sincerely sorry. Somebody fix me if I'm wrong there somewhere. I read that info long ago and I don't remember everything accurately.

Nailed it
m
0
l
!