Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Is GTX560 Ti a perfect match for i3 540

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
February 21, 2013 8:36:28 AM

Hello, I've been looking for another VGA card. And I think GTX560 Ti offer the great price and performance. Do you think it will be bottleneck if I use it with Intel Core i3 540?

Here's my spec:
Operating System: Windows 7 Ultimate 32-bit (6.1, Build 7600) (7600.win7_rtm.090713-1255)
Language: Indonesian (Regional Setting: Indonesian)
System Manufacturer: INTEL_
System Model: DH55PJ__
BIOS: BIOS Date: 03/26/10 13:44:50 Ver: 08.00.10
Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i3 CPU 540 @ 3.07GHz (4 CPUs), ~3.1GHz
Memory: 4096MB RAM
Available OS Memory: 3318MB RAM
Page File: 2015MB used, 4617MB available

Best solution

February 21, 2013 8:48:27 AM

Not at all.
Even something like GTX 660 Ti won't be bottlenecked by any i3, even if it's the first generation of i3s and not Sandy or Ivy.
Though, I really suggest that you'd get GTX 650 Ti instead, not 560 Ti.
560 Ti got too old and it won't be enough for most modern games. GTX 650 Ti can be bought for almost same price these days, and it will perform much better.
Well, of course, it only applies in the case if your getting "standard" GTX 560 Ti, not the "448 Cores" version.
If you'll get 560 Ti with 448 Cores, then it will perform better than 650 Ti (but will also cost more than "standard" 560 Ti). It all boils down to how much you're willing to spend.

Also, it will help quite significantly if you'll upgrade/change your 32 Bit Windows to 64 Bit version, that way you could install much more memory (if your motherboard allows, and I think it does), which would help quite a lot if you're planning on playing modern games (especially MMOs like Guild Wars 2, PSO II, or Planetside 2).
Two planks of 4GB 1333MHz (8GB in Dual Channel) would be quite enough, 16GB (Two planks 8GB each, in Dual Channel) 1333MHz would be overkill for almost any task you'll do.
Share
February 22, 2013 1:09:37 AM

master_chen said:
Not at all.
Even something like GTX 660 Ti won't be bottlenecked by any i3, even if it's the first generation of i3s and not Sandy or Ivy.
Though, I really suggest that you'd get GTX 650 Ti instead, not 560 Ti.
560 Ti got too old and it won't be enough for most modern games. GTX 650 Ti can be bought for almost same price these days, and it will perform much better.
Well, of course, it only applies in the case if your getting "standard" GTX 560 Ti, not the "448 Cores" version.
If you'll get 560 Ti with 448 Cores, then it will perform better than 650 Ti (but will also cost more than "standard" 560 Ti). It all boils down to how much you're willing to spend.

Also, it will help quite significantly if you'll upgrade/change your 32 Bit Windows to 64 Bit version, that way you could install much more memory (if your motherboard allows, and I think it does), which would help quite a lot if you're planning on playing modern games (especially MMOs like Guild Wars 2, PSO II, or Planetside 2).
Two planks of 4GB 1333MHz (8GB in Dual Channel) would be quite enough, 16GB (Two planks 8GB each, in Dual Channel) 1333MHz would be overkill for almost any task you'll do.


Your explanations are so clear. Thanks dude.
One more question, what is "448 cores" version? How could I never heard it before?
Score
0
Related resources
February 22, 2013 3:54:26 AM

Nokitron said:
What is "448 cores" version?


Basically, Nvidia managed to goof at the initial release of GTX 560 Ti - they released GPU with less capabilities than those that they promised at promotions and in advertisements.
Entire world outraged heavily, because Nvidia conned them. Later, Nvidia tried to regain trust back by releasing "True" GTX 560 Ti, with all promised capability intact, and called it "448 cores". "448 cores"-model works much, MUCH better than the initially released "joke of a card". So, basically, there are two GTX 560 Ti on the market right now: one is "shitty, initial-release 560 Ti" and other is "awesome, true 560 Ti, will all 448 cores", even though, in actuality, "448 cores" version uses GF110 chip and has two shader blocks disabled.
The main problem is in that "448 cores" was released in limited quantities and this makes it much harder to find than the "default 560 Ti". And, of course, it costs quite more.
Score
0
a c 171 Î Nvidia
February 25, 2013 11:56:10 PM

Nokitron said:
Your explanations are so clear. Thanks dude.
One more question, what is "448 cores" version? How could I never heard it before?

The 448 core version is a cut down 570 and not the "true" 560Ti as stated by master_chen and the reason it's a limited edition is because there are only so many broken 570's that can be used whereas the 384 core card had a proper production run .
Score
0
February 26, 2013 2:02:04 AM

Best answer selected by Nokitron.
Score
0
!