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Getting BSOD's ever since PSU upgrade

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Last response: in Windows 7
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March 27, 2012 5:18:09 AM

Hi all. I was originally having problems with my computer (purchased from CyberPowerPC mid-2011) randomly shutting down while playing an intensive 3D game. This stopped happening for 1-2 months, and earlier this month started happening again.

I talked with a hardware guru friend of mine, and checked event logs, and noticed all my critical errors were coming from the source Kernel-Power. There were no error codes. The EventData for them all was:
Quote:
EventData

BugcheckCode 0
BugcheckParameter1 0x0
BugcheckParameter2 0x0
BugcheckParameter3 0x0
BugcheckParameter4 0x0
SleepInProgress false
PowerButtonTimestamp 0


My PSU seemed to be the issue. It was originally an 800 watt XtremeGaming PSU, which I soon found out was very cheap and very poorly made. XG doesn't seem to even sell them anymore. From what I found, the 800 watt PSU retailed for maybe $30-40 USD.

So, due to a recommendation from a friend, I bought a new PSU. The Corsair HX Professional Series 750-Watt 80 Plus Certified Power Supply Compatible with Core i7 and Core i5 - CMPSU-750HX.


I decided to install the PSU manually. While I do consider myself very software savvy, I am very much so the opposite when it comes to hardware. It's just not my thing.

Next to putting in the PSU, the most advanced thing I've ever done with computer hardware is put in a LAN card.

Anyways, after a prolonged period of time, I finally got the PSU in, and my computer up and running. Do note that I did accidentally screw up the USB Header connection on the mobo, and thus the few USB connections at the top of my computer no longer work.


I have been having issues ever since. Soon after I turn on(or restart) my computer, it freezes for 1-2 minutes. ex. I turn it on, Skype/MSN/Antivirus/etc start up, I open up my browser, I started typing this message, and it froze (froze meaning most of my applications, my Windows OS (explorer), etc.) less than 10 minutes of it being on. It usually only did this once every boot up.

Note that my main HD, which contains anti-viruses, drivers, and my Windows 7 OS, is a 32GB SSD. My data drive, which contains everything else, ex. documents, games, etc, is a Western Digital 750GB.

Thinking it was a HD issue, the hardware guru friend of mine advised that I try switching the SATA to PSU connections in my PSU. There are only two plugs for the SATA in my PSU, so I just switched them with eachother. This didn't help.


Very recently, it has started freezing abruptly more than once every boot up. Perhaps a few hours apart, but still more than once. Earlier today, it froze for a second time after boot up. This time, a Windows component crashed. ioStor.. something ... couldn't write down the whole thing before it BSOD'd.

I got a BSOD error code F4. There were new critical errors in my event log, but they were all the same as the previous ones (see above for more info.)

This happened maybe 4-6 hours ago. Less than 20 minutes ago as I am typing this, I got another, similar BSOD - while I was AFK, actually. Nothing too intensive was running. No games.


I didn't get the details from the first BSOD today. I did from the second. They are as follows:
Quote:
Problem signature:
Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.768.3
Locale ID: 1033

Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: f4
BCP1: 0000000000000003
BCP2: FFFFFA800A342060
BCP3: FFFFFA800A342340
BCP4: FFFFF8000319E5F0
OS Version: 6_1_7601
Service Pack: 1_0
Product: 768_1


I do also have the complete BSOD dumps from both the first and second BSOD's today. I zipped them both and they can be downloaded at:
http://www.mediafire.com/?4rxb22rj138whhb

Here are the error sources (not critical) from the event logger as of recently:
iaStor
Dhcp-Client
WMI
Service Container
Bug Check
Event Log
volsnap

Many of the not-so-recent errors in the event log have the same sources.

I hope someone can help me solve this frustrating issue. Thanks all.

More about : bsod psu upgrade

a b $ Windows 7
March 27, 2012 6:48:33 AM

untamed said:
Hi all. I was originally having problems with my computer (purchased from CyberPowerPC mid-2011) randomly shutting down while playing an intensive 3D game. This stopped happening for 1-2 months, and earlier this month started happening again.

I talked with a hardware guru friend of mine, and checked event logs, and noticed all my critical errors were coming from the source Kernel-Power. There were no error codes. The EventData for them all was:
Quote:
EventData

BugcheckCode 0
BugcheckParameter1 0x0
BugcheckParameter2 0x0
BugcheckParameter3 0x0
BugcheckParameter4 0x0
SleepInProgress false
PowerButtonTimestamp 0


My PSU seemed to be the issue. It was originally an 800 watt XtremeGaming PSU, which I soon found out was very cheap and very poorly made. XG doesn't seem to even sell them anymore. From what I found, the 800 watt PSU retailed for maybe $30-40 USD.

So, due to a recommendation from a friend, I bought a new PSU. The Corsair HX Professional Series 750-Watt 80 Plus Certified Power Supply Compatible with Core i7 and Core i5 - CMPSU-750HX.


I decided to install the PSU manually. While I do consider myself very software savvy, I am very much so the opposite when it comes to hardware. It's just not my thing.

Next to putting in the PSU, the most advanced thing I've ever done with computer hardware is put in a LAN card.

Anyways, after a prolonged period of time, I finally got the PSU in, and my computer up and running. Do note that I did accidentally screw up the USB Header connection on the mobo, and thus the few USB connections at the top of my computer no longer work.


I have been having issues ever since. Soon after I turn on(or restart) my computer, it freezes for 1-2 minutes. ex. I turn it on, Skype/MSN/Antivirus/etc start up, I open up my browser, I started typing this message, and it froze (froze meaning most of my applications, my Windows OS (explorer), etc.) less than 10 minutes of it being on. It usually only did this once every boot up.

Note that my main HD, which contains anti-viruses, drivers, and my Windows 7 OS, is a 32GB SSD. My data drive, which contains everything else, ex. documents, games, etc, is a Western Digital 750GB.

Thinking it was a HD issue, the hardware guru friend of mine advised that I try switching the SATA to PSU connections in my PSU. There are only two plugs for the SATA in my PSU, so I just switched them with eachother. This didn't help.


Very recently, it has started freezing abruptly more than once every boot up. Perhaps a few hours apart, but still more than once. Earlier today, it froze for a second time after boot up. This time, a Windows component crashed. ioStor.. something ... couldn't write down the whole thing before it BSOD'd.

I got a BSOD error code F4. There were new critical errors in my event log, but they were all the same as the previous ones (see above for more info.)

This happened maybe 4-6 hours ago. Less than 20 minutes ago as I am typing this, I got another, similar BSOD - while I was AFK, actually. Nothing too intensive was running. No games.


I didn't get the details from the first BSOD today. I did from the second. They are as follows:
Quote:
Problem signature:
Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.768.3
Locale ID: 1033

Additional information about the problem:
BCCode: f4
BCP1: 0000000000000003
BCP2: FFFFFA800A342060
BCP3: FFFFFA800A342340
BCP4: FFFFF8000319E5F0
OS Version: 6_1_7601
Service Pack: 1_0
Product: 768_1


I do also have the complete BSOD dumps from both the first and second BSOD's today. I zipped them both and they can be downloaded at:
http://www.mediafire.com/?4rxb22rj138whhb

Here are the error sources (not critical) from the event logger as of recently:
iaStor
Dhcp-Client
WMI
Service Container
Bug Check
Event Log
volsnap

Many of the not-so-recent errors in the event log have the same sources.

I hope someone can help me solve this frustrating issue. Thanks all.

Might look for some commonality in these links of f4 bccode
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l
March 27, 2012 8:00:02 AM

there is a chance that the OS kernel went corrupted with your last powersupply or might be the result of screwed hardware on your mobo. try first reinstalling the OS and if problem persists try another mobo.
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Related resources
March 27, 2012 8:03:36 AM

The most important Blue Screen of Death troubleshooting step you can take is to ask yourself what you just did.

1) Did you just install a new program or a piece of hardware, update a driver, install an update, etc.? If so, there's a very good chance that the change you made caused the BSOD:
Startup using Last Known Good Configuration to undo recent registry and driver changes.
Use System Restore to undo recent system changes.
Roll Back device driver to version prior to your driver update.

2) Scan your computer for viruses. Some viruses can cause a Blue Screen of Death, especially ones that infect the master boot record (MBR) or boot sector.

3) Update drivers for your hardware. Most Blue Screens of Death are hardware or driver related so updated drivers could fix the cause of the STOP error.

4) Return hardware settings to default in Device Manager. Unless you have a specific reason to do so, the system resources that an individual piece of hardware is configured to use in Device Manager should be set to default. Non-default hardware settings have been known to cause a Blue Screen of Death.

5) Return BIOS settings to their default levels. An overclocked or misconfigured BIOS can cause all sorts of random issues, including BSODs.
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March 27, 2012 8:13:12 AM

Clear your CMOS first.
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March 27, 2012 8:15:58 AM

Thanks for the replies, all. The help is highly appreciated.

As I originally mentioned, I have indeed recently installed a new PSU, to replace a screwed up and cheap one.

My system is not overclocked (albeit it is easily capable of being so, I just haven't gotten to it).

I have already scanned my computer for viruses and malware, and I constantly have numerous scans a day occur as to stay protected.

After I changed my PSU, I had issues starting up. I cleared my CMOS and all was fine. Unknowingly, I had some issues initially that were pertaining to my computer's time being reset to something along the lines of January 1st, 2005. I changed this in Windows, as I didn't know at the time I was supposed to change it in the BIOS.
From what I was told, although this isn't particularly ideal, once I restarted the machine, the BIOS supposedly updated to the same time as Windows, i.e. the BIOS time no longer needed to be changed.

I've also already ran ChkDsk on the SSD.

I just looked at this computer's specific hardware specs, and the two hard drives in my machine are specifically as follows:
Main HD: 60 GB OCZ Agility 3 SATA III 6.0G/s Gaming MLC Solid State Disk
Secondary HD: 750GB SATA-III 6.0Gb/s 64MB Cache 7200RPM HDD

I don't think I have updated drivers of either HD. Would it be a good idea to update, at least, the OCZ? If so, is there any specific driver I am looking for?

Thanks all.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 27, 2012 12:23:59 PM

Quote:
Bug Check 0xF4: CRITICAL_OBJECT_TERMINATION

This indicates that a process or thread crucial to system operation has unexpectedly exited or been terminated.


This one is usually seen alongside other BSOD's, and typically means either bad RAM, or a bad driver. RAM could explain what you are seeing [if some windows service were to crash at startup, which could be causing the symptoms you describe], and is a bit easier to believe then a bad driver.

To be safe, run memtest86/Prime95 and see if either one fails. If so, you have a stick of bad RAM.
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l
March 27, 2012 12:39:05 PM

I say go for fresh install.
-Bruce
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March 28, 2012 7:45:18 AM

I just ran memtest86 4.2.0 [latest version], which had two passes and no errors. So apparently it's not a RAM issue.

Does anyone else have any other suggestion, preferably aside from completely reformatting? Should I try checking any of my drivers? Run any more hardware debugging applications? Prime95? Someone recommended I try running gwscan to check the hard drives?

Thanks all.
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a b $ Windows 7
March 28, 2012 12:10:04 PM

Run prime95 just to be safe, as memtest doesn't always pick up bad RAM [especially if its a bit that sometimes "sticks"]. No reason to reformat until hardware is ruled out as the cause.
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March 29, 2012 4:12:21 PM

If it's a rig you built yourself, you may wish to clear cmos once more, take out all ram and boot with one stick, then reboot with a 2nd stick, 3rd and so fourth. Also, is your bios set in SATA or AHCI mode for the SSD?
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