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Is this what a DVI to VGA adapter is supposed to look like?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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February 28, 2013 10:59:48 AM



As you can see there are only 6 pins in my DVI to VGA adapter.
I'm asking this cause my monitor looks a little fuzzy and blurry when connected to my GTX 580, and look extremely fuzzy and blurry when connected to the onboard graphics card (I can tell just by just looking at the text).
Is it possible the adapter has something to do with the fuzziness/blurriness? Or is the adapter "either 100% works or black screen"?
February 28, 2013 11:05:00 AM

Go to Google Images and type DVI-TO-VGA (caps not required). You will see a page full of examples there. Some adapters have fewer pins than others, but I did not see one with only 6 pins.
February 28, 2013 11:06:42 AM

Neither did I (see any adapters similar to mine). That's why I asked this question here.
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February 28, 2013 11:08:26 AM

Is your monitor a VGA one?
In that case, you have 2 options: either try a different adapter, or just get a different monitor.
February 28, 2013 11:12:11 AM

Easier said than done. Anyway, why waste money to find out for myself if there is the possibility that someone out here on the internet knows?
February 28, 2013 11:13:22 AM

Looks like the configuration you showed is not on the list I gave you.

That means, you need to get a proper adapter (at least), or live with the image you're getting now on the monitor.
February 28, 2013 11:20:41 AM

Question about adapters, does missing half the pins mean there will be slight blurriness with the GPU and extreme blurriness with the onboard graphics? If your answer is "go buy a new adapter and find out", no thanks.
February 28, 2013 11:30:57 AM

I didn't say "go buy a new adapter", I said "try a new adapter", meaning you can just borrow one, if you think an adapter is too expensive for your GTX 580.

As far as the difference in the blurriness between the 2 graphics solutions, you will need to get in touch with an engineer that might be able to explain the correlation between the quality of the video signal, how it is distributed between pins, and the quality of the image as a result of these variable factors. You might want to Google that one out, too.

I am offering a quick possible solution for your problem, but if you need a detailed and technically informed answer to your last question, don't stick with the forums, rather go and do some research of specialized articles, also get in touch with an engineer that does video card design for in-depth explanation. Good luck.
February 28, 2013 11:37:33 AM

Quote:
but if you need a detailed and technically informed answer to your last question, don't stick with the forums

You'd be surprised the kind of people you can find in forums.

Btw, what is a forum good for? If I was just going to go try out a new adapter, I wouldn't have needed to ask a question here.
February 28, 2013 11:46:39 AM

Did the adapter come with your GTX 580? If it did then you are using the correct one and will have to just live with it or buy a new monitor. If it did not then you can buy a adapter that will work correctly with the GTX 580 or buy a new monitor. Ether way if your monitor is old and needs replaced anyway since it is analog only. Fact is with a monitor that old it may never give you the crisp looking txt you are looking for ever.
February 28, 2013 11:56:56 AM

bryonhowley said:
Did the adapter come with your GTX 580? If it did then you are using the correct one and will have to just live with it or buy a new monitor. If it did not then you can buy a adapter that will work correctly with the GTX 580 or buy a new monitor. Ether way if your monitor is old and needs replaced anyway since it is analog only. Fact is with a monitor that old it may never give you the crisp looking txt you are looking for ever.

Yes the adapter came with the GTX 580. What I don't understand is first why I can't find the same pin layout anywhere on the internet, and second is why it's fuzzy/blurry (esp when connected to onboard graphics). I'm using a brand new LG LCD monitor, even though its analog only, it's not at all old.
February 28, 2013 12:08:52 PM

gebran bassil said:
Quote:
but if you need a detailed and technically informed answer to your last question, don't stick with the forums

You'd be surprised the kind of people you can find in forums.

True that...

Fact is, you are missing the possible explanation in my reply.
Increasing pipeline parallelism increases the opportunities for delivering a quality signal and modulating that signal.
Since you never provided the make/model of your integrated video adapter, nobody could have given you the answer you seek (regarding the difference in blurriness). All I can tell is that the 6 pins are NOT transmitting all the signal required for a quality image to be reconstructed on the monitor. There is a difference in WHAT components of the video signal are making it through the 6 pins when the GTX is used versus when the integrated chip is used (whatever that chip may be), and that difference may account for the "blurriness" issue. You might be lucky to get an image at all, since a correct VGA rendering requires more pins than you have available (and even the GTX is delivering only a analog signal that is "blunted", as well).

That's what I meant by "the correlation between the quality of the video signal, how it is distributed between pins, and the quality of the image as a result of these variable factors".

Last but not least, if you are going to quote me, don't take my sentences out of context. If you read the entire phrase, I was NOT pointing to any "limited intellectual capacity of people on the forums", as you are implying, but merely suggesting that you should not limit your research on this (or any) subject to some forums, instead you should go straight to the source to get the most informed and complete answers (esp. given the fact that you are not willing to take action to correct the issue, but are making more of a theoretical point out of it). Going around and twisting the meaning of other people's opinion is not going to get you the help you need.
February 28, 2013 12:13:19 PM

Analog signals are not '100% works or black screen' so interference can be introduced and displayed, whereas with digital it is '100% works or black screen'. This is why we can hear fuzz on AM/FM bands and we hear music or nothing from Satellite radio.

To understand what's going on, you need to understand what is going on with each of the pins on a DVI to VGA adapter.

First, the adapter that you have looks like it's in rough shape. That adapter is missing the pin that controls analog vsync (not the same as turning vsync on in a game). This is part of a standard DVI-A connection. This could be why your getting blurriness. Please see the links below for more info:
DVI
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dvi
VGA
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VGA_connector

There could also be interference in the cheap adapter from metals used or bad ground etc.

You own a GTX 580. You need to treat it well and not connect junk connectors to it. Buy a DVI to VGA connector that's not faulty with missing pins.
February 28, 2013 12:18:02 PM

ubercake said:
Analog signals are not '100% works or black screen' so interference can be introduced and displayed, whereas with digital it is '100% works or black screen'. This is why we can hear fuzz on AM/FM bands and we hear music or nothing from Satellite radio.

To understand what's going on, you need to understand what is going on with each of the pins on a DVI to VGA adapter.

First, the adapter that you have looks like it's in rough shape. That adapter is missing the pin that controls analog vsync (not the same as turning vsync on in a game). This is part of a standard DVI-A connection. This could be why your getting blurriness. Please see the links below for more info:
DVI
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dvi
VGA
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VGA_connector

There could also be interference in the cheap adapter from metals used or bad ground etc.

You own a GTX 580. You need to treat it well and not connect junk connectors to it. Buy a DVI to VGA connector that's not faulty with missing pins.

Correct. That's what I have been trying to tell him; besides, his adapter is missing at least 2 pins (we might never know what it was supposed to look like initially).
Also, he's not willing to replace it. He made that clear repeatedly.
February 28, 2013 12:27:54 PM

I'm not aware of any analogue-only monitors that aren't pretty old. Being analogue-only doesn't necessarily mean that it needs to be replaced either, but that probably wouldn't hurt.

It's likely that that adapter is at least part of the problem. I'm not an expert on DVI-A and VGA/D-Sub, but I can't see such a small number of pins being a good thing when a regular DVI to VGA/D-Sub adapter has something like half of the total pin count.
February 28, 2013 1:09:16 PM

Ok, thank you everyone, I guess I'm going to buy a new DVI-A adapter and will see how it works.
February 28, 2013 1:14:34 PM

Silly question but did you adjust the monitor? When you use an analog monitor you need to adjust it. Open a web page and full screen it. Then hit the Auto adjust button on the monitor. If there is no auto button dig thru the menus to find auto adjust.

Keep in mind it wont adjust correctly if there is a game, or video running. The screen has to be more or less static.
!