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sticky stuff on CD - can it be cleaned

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November 16, 2004 4:15:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Someone had borrowed my CDs.
One of them came back with a sticky spot
about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).

How can I clean it without damaging the CD?

More about : sticky stuff cleaned

Anonymous
November 16, 2004 6:19:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Bubba" <bubba654@aol.com> wrote in message
news:L3nmd.247$hc5.935322@news4.srv.hcvlny.cv.net
> Someone had borrowed my CDs.
> One of them came back with a sticky spot
> about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).
>
> How can I clean it without damaging the CD?

In the states we have a product called: Goo Gone.
Anonymous
November 16, 2004 8:39:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 13:15:23 GMT, "Bubba" <bubba654@aol.com> wrote:

>Someone had borrowed my CDs.
>One of them came back with a sticky spot
>about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).
>
>How can I clean it without damaging the CD?
>
>
Give it back to the person who borrowed it and say - here you go, this
one is now yours - buy me a new one.

If they can get the stuff off, they have a nice CD.

d
Pearce Consulting
http://www.pearce.uk.com
Related resources
Anonymous
November 16, 2004 11:29:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

>> Someone had borrowed my CDs.
>> One of them came back with a sticky spot
>> about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).
>>
>> How can I clean it without damaging the CD?
>
>In the states we have a product called: Goo Gone.

Goo Gone has a significant amount of petroleum distillate of some sort
in it. I'm not sure it'd be safe to use on polycarbonate (the clear
part of the CD) and it might attack the lacquer on the label side.
You really don't want to degrade the lacquer of the label... if you
eat through the lacquer and the (thin) protective layer beneath it,
you can quite easily damage the aluminumized data layer and make the
CD unplayable.

First thing I'd do, in a case like this, is stick the CD in a computer
and run a "ripping" package to make a complete backup of its contents.
That way, if the original copy is damaged during cleaning, I could
burn a CD-R and still have the music available.

Then, rather than using Goo Gone or another solvent-based product, I'd
probably try something very gentle: vegetable oil. Vegetable oil
will soften many forms of adhesive and gum, if you give it enough time
to soak in (overnight is not too long), and it's mild enough not to
affect the plastic and (probably) not hurt the label inks or lacquer.

Goop the sticky spot with cooking oil of some sort, let it sit
overnight, and then either [1] wipe it off *gently*, center to edge,
with a clean cotton ball, or [2] use clean warm water, some liquid
dishwashing detergent, and a clean sponge or cotton ball to wash it
off. Don't scrub. If some but not all of the sticky comes off, shake
the water off and air-dry the disc (or pat it dry very gently with a
clean soft cloth), apply more cooking oil, and repeat the process.

Oh, yeah... have a firm word with whomever borrowed your CDs. [Back
in college, lo those many years ago, I loaned a treasured LP to a
fellow student. It came back *extremely* noisy... he'd played it
repeatedly during a party, and the tobacco and various other smokes
had glopped up the grooves. I ended up having to replace it, and I
swore off loaning out my records to anybody.]

--
Dave Platt <dplatt@radagast.org> AE6EO
Hosting the Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 1:02:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Dave Platt" <dplatt@radagast.org> wrote in message
news:10pkoportg67bad@corp.supernews.com
>>> Someone had borrowed my CDs.
>>> One of them came back with a sticky spot
>>> about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).
>>>
>>> How can I clean it without damaging the CD?
>>
>> In the states we have a product called: Goo Gone.
>
> Goo Gone has a significant amount of petroleum distillate of some sort
> in it.

Yes, but the phrase petroleum distillate covers an immense range, while Goo
Gone focuses on the end of the spectrum of petroleum distallates that are
non-damaging to most plastics.

> I'm not sure it'd be safe to use on polycarbonate (the clear
> part of the CD) and it might attack the lacquer on the label side.

Nope, and nope.

I just non-sacrificed a blank to a bath in Goo Gone and it dried off as
shiny as it got wet.

> You really don't want to degrade the lacquer of the label... if you
> eat through the lacquer and the (thin) protective layer beneath it,
> you can quite easily damage the aluminumized data layer and make the
> CD unplayable.

I share your concern, but Goo Gone is a lot more like paint thinner than
lacquer thinner.

> First thing I'd do, in a case like this, is stick the CD in a computer
> and run a "ripping" package to make a complete backup of its contents.

If possible. However, there's no problem with cleaning discs with solvents
that are benign to polycarbonate and lacquer. That includes mild, soapy
water and the heavier petroleum distillates.

> That way, if the original copy is damaged during cleaning, I could
> burn a CD-R and still have the music available.

The magic words being benign solvents.

> Then, rather than using Goo Gone or another solvent-based product, I'd
> probably try something very gentle: vegetable oil. Vegetable oil
> will soften many forms of adhesive and gum, if you give it enough time
> to soak in (overnight is not too long), and it's mild enough not to
> affect the plastic and (probably) not hurt the label inks or lacquer.

Tried olive oil and it caused no problems, but left an oily mess that soapy
water cleaned up.

> Goop the sticky spot with cooking oil of some sort, let it sit
> overnight, and then either [1] wipe it off *gently*, center to edge,
> with a clean cotton ball, or [2] use clean warm water, some liquid
> dishwashing detergent, and a clean sponge or cotton ball to wash it
> off. Don't scrub. If some but not all of the sticky comes off, shake
> the water off and air-dry the disc (or pat it dry very gently with a
> clean soft cloth), apply more cooking oil, and repeat the process.

That can work, but IME vegetable oil isn't as effective as Goo Gone.

> Oh, yeah... have a firm word with whomever borrowed your CDs. [Back
> in college, lo those many years ago, I loaned a treasured LP to a
> fellow student. It came back *extremely* noisy... he'd played it
> repeatedly during a party, and the tobacco and various other smokes
> had glopped up the grooves. I ended up having to replace it, and I
> swore off loaning out my records to anybody.]

My attitude is that you win some, you lose some. In this day and age, I'd
loan a CD-R copy.
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 1:09:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

> On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 13:15:23 GMT, "Bubba" <bubba654@aol.com> wrote:
>
>
>>Someone had borrowed my CDs.
>>One of them came back with a sticky spot
>>about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).
>>
>>How can I clean it without damaging the CD?

Although polycarbonate is very shock resistant is is very
vulnerable to various solvents. Do not use ready-to-use or
spray detergents, they might contain abrasive stuff and/or
ammonia which is detrimental to the surface. Normal diluted
soap is harmless, however, it might not dissolve glue from a
sticker or chewing gum.

Do not use ethanol (common alcohol), ether, acetone,
benzene, oil and such. The only solvent recommended by
polycarbonate manufacturers is n-propanol (iso-propanol,
isopropyl-alcohol). Your drug store should sell it for a few
dollars a bottle. I'd not recommend cotton to wipe the
surface, rather wool or silk or soft artificial fiber cloth.
And make sure you don't soak the label side with the solvent...

While wipeing be sure to hold the surface against a light
source so you can see whether there are smears remaining.
Continue with fresh n-propanol and a clean part of the soft
cloth until the smears are gone completely.

Cheers,

Franco
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 1:15:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Franco Del Principe wrote:

>> On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 13:15:23 GMT, "Bubba" <bubba654@aol.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Someone had borrowed my CDs.
>>> One of them came back with a sticky spot
>>> about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).
>>>
>>> How can I clean it without damaging the CD?
>
>
> Although polycarbonate is very shock resistant is is very vulnerable to
> various solvents. Do not use ready-to-use or spray detergents, they
> might contain abrasive stuff and/or ammonia which is detrimental to the
> surface. Normal diluted soap is harmless, however, it might not dissolve
> glue from a sticker or chewing gum.
>
> Do not use ethanol (common alcohol), ether, acetone, benzene, oil and
> such. The only solvent recommended by polycarbonate manufacturers is
> n-propanol (iso-propanol, isopropyl-alcohol). Your drug store should
> sell it for a few dollars a bottle. I'd not recommend cotton to wipe the
> surface, rather wool or silk or soft artificial fiber cloth. And make
> sure you don't soak the label side with the solvent...
>
> While wipeing be sure to hold the surface against a light source so you
> can see whether there are smears remaining. Continue with fresh
> n-propanol and a clean part of the soft cloth until the smears are gone
> completely.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Franco

Sorry for the miss-spelling:

It should read 2-propanol, and not n-propanol.
Well, it's been a while since my chemistry class... ;-)

Cheers,

Franco
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 1:15:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Franco Del Principe wrote:

> Franco Del Principe wrote:
>
> >> On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 13:15:23 GMT, "Bubba" <bubba654@aol.com> wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>> Someone had borrowed my CDs.
> >>> One of them came back with a sticky spot
> >>> about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).
> >>>
> >>> How can I clean it without damaging the CD?
> >
> >
> > Although polycarbonate is very shock resistant is is very vulnerable to
> > various solvents. Do not use ready-to-use or spray detergents, they
> > might contain abrasive stuff and/or ammonia which is detrimental to the
> > surface. Normal diluted soap is harmless, however, it might not dissolve
> > glue from a sticker or chewing gum.
> >
> > Do not use ethanol (common alcohol), ether, acetone, benzene, oil and
> > such. The only solvent recommended by polycarbonate manufacturers is
> > n-propanol (iso-propanol, isopropyl-alcohol). Your drug store should
> > sell it for a few dollars a bottle. I'd not recommend cotton to wipe the
> > surface, rather wool or silk or soft artificial fiber cloth. And make
> > sure you don't soak the label side with the solvent...
> >
> > While wipeing be sure to hold the surface against a light source so you
> > can see whether there are smears remaining. Continue with fresh
> > n-propanol and a clean part of the soft cloth until the smears are gone
> > completely.
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Franco
>
> Sorry for the miss-spelling:
>
> It should read 2-propanol, and not n-propanol.
> Well, it's been a while since my chemistry class... ;-)
>
> Cheers,
>
> Franco

If you want to be really fussy, it's Propan-2-ol according to the label on my
500ml bottle. It's likely to be better know as isopropyl alcohol though ( or
even isopropanol ! ). ;-)

A great cleaning solvent.

Graham
November 17, 2004 1:53:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Don Pearce" <donaldun@spamfreepearce.uk.com> wrote in message
news:419a3b12.116914343@212.159.2.87...
> On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 13:15:23 GMT, "Bubba" <bubba654@aol.com> wrote:
>
>>Someone had borrowed my CDs.
>>One of them came back with a sticky spot
>>about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).
>>
>>How can I clean it without damaging the CD?
>>
>>
> Give it back to the person who borrowed it and say - here you go, this
> one is now yours - buy me a new one.

CD is no longer available for purchase.

>
> If they can get the stuff off, they have a nice CD.
>
> d
> Pearce Consulting
> http://www.pearce.uk.com
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 2:27:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Bubba wrote:

> "Don Pearce" <donaldun@spamfreepearce.uk.com> wrote in message
> news:419a3b12.116914343@212.159.2.87...
> > On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 13:15:23 GMT, "Bubba" <bubba654@aol.com> wrote:
> >
> >>Someone had borrowed my CDs.
> >>One of them came back with a sticky spot
> >>about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).
> >>
> >>How can I clean it without damaging the CD?
> >>
> >>
> > Give it back to the person who borrowed it and say - here you go, this
> > one is now yours - buy me a new one.
>
> CD is no longer available for purchase.

Better get some isopropyl alochol then !

Other solvents may well be a little too agressive.


Graham
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 11:47:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Bubba" <bubba654@aol.com> wrote:

>
>"Don Pearce" <donaldun@spamfreepearce.uk.com> wrote in message
>news:419a3b12.116914343@212.159.2.87...
>> On Tue, 16 Nov 2004 13:15:23 GMT, "Bubba" <bubba654@aol.com> wrote:
>>
>>>Someone had borrowed my CDs.
>>>One of them came back with a sticky spot
>>>about 1/2" (most probably chewing gum).
>>>
>>>How can I clean it without damaging the CD?
>>>
>>>
>> Give it back to the person who borrowed it and say - here you go, this
>> one is now yours - buy me a new one.
>
>CD is no longer available for purchase.

Remove the sticky spot with WD-40. Clean the WD-40 residue with
diluted diswasher soap.
---
El Meda.

http://ingemeda.tripod.com/
Anonymous
November 17, 2004 10:40:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <muomp0524ga08km44agnb5f4u0kennqev8@4ax.com>,
El Meda <gomerem@hotmail.com> wrote:

>>CD is no longer available for purchase.
>
>Remove the sticky spot with WD-40. Clean the WD-40 residue with
>diluted diswasher soap.

I'd offer a cautionary note about the use of various products on CDs,
even if they seem benign.

Some years ago, one or two of the audiophile magazines latched onto
the idea of using Armor-All as a surface cleaner/treatment for CDs.
It appeared to clean up the surface, reduce the effects of small
scratches, and the magazine writers swore that they could hear a
difference in the sound.

They ended up having to eat crow, some months later, when it turned
out that Armor-All caused a slow but progressive "hazing" to develop
on the surface of the disc. Although it had seemed safe at first, and
had no visible ill effects, it caused some amount of latent damage to
the polycarbonate and ended up ruining some CDs.

I'd be concerned about WD-40 for the same reason. It's not, as far as
I know, formulated with the intent of being safe for use on optically
clear plastics - its primary job is water displacement on metal
surfaces (it's not even a terribly good long-term lubricant). Before
I used it to clean a valuable CD, I'd try it on an unwanted CD in good
physical condition, and wait several months to see if the CD showed
any signs of damage.

Short exposure to WD-40 might be safe for the polycarbonate, or might
not. Since we've had one person say that Goo Gone is apparently safe,
that might be a better bet (although there, too, I'd feel more
comfortable knowing that the CD which was tested didn't show signs of
polycarbonate or ink/lacquer damage after a few months of further use).

--
Dave Platt <dplatt@radagast.org> AE6EO
Hosting the Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!
!