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Burning copies of DVD movies?!?

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April 12, 2002 6:34:41 PM

Hi, I recently purchased a Pioneer DVD DVR-A03 burner and i'm wondering what it takes to make copies of DVD movies? I have seen software that allows for converting a DVD movie into a VCD but i was told since i have a DVD burner that all i need is some sort of decoder or something. Hoping someone here can clear this up for me.

Thanks
April 12, 2002 10:09:33 PM

you need to be able to do something with the region code .. do a search for this file on the net .. I believe the dvd\hollywood people have forced its removal from a lot of sites but like anything they can chase it but some people just won't obey

DeCSSplus_v1.0.zip

lagger

ps although I really have no experience with this ( no burner or desire for movies) this is the readme from the file I mentioned ( I like to collect stuff like this because "they" say I shouldn't lol)

!! THIS PROGRAM IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE ONLY !!
!! YOU ARE NOT ALLOWED TO MISUSE THIS PROGRAM TO COPY DVDS !!


DeCSSplus v1.0 - Decrypt without knowing the key - (c) 2000 Ethan Hawke
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

About the syntax:
DeCSSplus VOBInputFile [VOBOutputFile] [/p[ause]] [/v{0..9}] [/o[utput]] [/s]
/p : Pause at the end of execution
/v : Verbosity level 0..9
/o : Use VOBInputFile as output if no output file given
/s : Scan entier file. Default is to stop after having found 20 times the same key.

About the program:
DeCSSplus is another program which decrypts the content of a DVD drive. DeCSS by MoRE
is still my favorite when you have the original medium. But what to do when someone
gives you the crypted content WITHOUT the DVD or a key to decrypt it? Well, you could
start guessing the key or just use this program [:) ].

How it works:
We used Frank A. Stevenson's alogithm of finding the key from the crypted and decrypted
content. The only problem was: How to find the decrypted content? Pretty easy, if we
might add. The content that was ciphered is an MPEG-2 stream. So if you somehow pre-
dicted ten bytes of the ciphered stream you could calculate the key.
Have you ever looked at a MPEG bitstream which compressed a black screen? You'd see a
lot of repetitions. And that's exactly what we're exploiting.

Why we made it:
Think of it: a 40 bit disc key, a 40 bit chapter key and a 40 bit player key is used
to decipher a DVD movie. Difficult to crack the key you say. Brute force might work
if your mpeg stream has a CRC to check if the content is right. You'd need a few days
but we do it in less than a few seconds. Some people at hollywood made it a heck of a
lot easy for us.

Post Readme:
Have phun using this program. And don't copy DVDs.

!! YOU ARE NOT ALLOWED TO MISUSE THIS PROGRAM TO COPY DVDS !!
!! THIS PROGRAM IS FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE ONLY !!

last minute edit.. try <A HREF="http://www.mpegx.com/video.asp?dcat=VideoRipper" target="_new">This</A> site for some newer stuff ( freeware etc)

<b><font color=blue>Checking under my North<font color=red> AND</font color=red> South bridges for <font color=green>Trolls</font color=green></font color=blue><P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by lagger on 04/12/02 06:18 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
April 13, 2002 4:52:02 PM

In many countries (the USA included) you have a legal right to make a backup copy of any media for which you have a valid license. Under fair use law you also have the right to do as you please (within your own household) with the media - this means copying, editing, anything - so long as there is no commercial profit derived and the results are not publicly published except for educational or limited journalistic purposes.

The provisions at the beginning of movies state something along the lines of, "any unauthorized copying or public display is prohibited," etc. Well, fair use based copying or public display <b>is</b> authorized by the US Constitution, past copyright law and precedent, and even the DMCA. If you read the sections always cited by the media companies when referring to violations of technical copyright protections in the DMCA, you will see that fair use is specifically excluded from the restrictions.
Quote:
โ€˜โ€˜ยง 1201.(c) OTHER RIGHTS, ETC., NOT AFFECTED.โ€”(1) Nothing in this section shall affect rights, remedies, limitations, or defenses to copyright infringement, including fair use, under this title.

Despite the mantra of the studios, labels, software houses and even the publishers, copyright only applies to commercial uses. Yet these media companies continue to use means to stop individuals from exercising their rights under the guise of piracy prevention. These companies use means designed specifically to prevent fair use. They have many other means to prevent big-business piracy - this is not their target. Their target is the home user (where they have no right) and small business user (where they have every right).

This is the dirty little secret (and the big lie) of the media companies. If you have a legal license to use any media (video, audio, software, etc.) you have the RIGHT to do as you wish with it within your household so long as you don't derive commercial profit. This means that if you buy one copy of MS Office, you can legally install and use it on all of your home systems (which are not used for business) as you please, despite the license agreement. You obtain that right the moment you pay for the software - not when you click "agree" on the install. This is also the case for copy-protected DVDs and the like.

If you buy (or even rent) a DVD or VHS cassette or video game for that matter, you have the legal right to make a copy of it for archival purposes and later use. A license has no legal time restraint in the home and fair use environments. Just like if you record a TV show or PPV, you have the right to watch it 2 years later, the same applies to video and game rentals. As long as the archived media is used within your domain (home, car, cabin, boat, pasture, etc.), with your (or your agent's) presence, or for educational or allowed journalistic purposes, you are within your rights. The media companies want to destroy these individual rights.

When the US was founded, the idea of copyright and patents was hotly debated by the founding fathers - its previous use in England was designed to stifle religious and political freedoms by making it illegal to print and distribute using a non-authorized press. Many of the founding fathers, Thomas Jefferson - Author of the Declaration of Independance - included, believed that intellectual property rights would eliminate individuals' rights and fought hard against their being instituted. Others saw the need for some protection of the inventor, author and artist to allow them to retain a limited monopoly on their work for a limited time - thereby ensuring their livelyhood and the progress of the arts and sciences. A compromise was reached. There was never a provision for the big media companies to be able to maintain their exhorbitant profits, year after year. Nor were there provisions to allow big business to retain these rights - the intellectual property belongs to the individual(s) who created it, not the company they work for when they discover or create it. If the company had a hand (or dollar) in creating it, they have the right to fair compensation (but not infinite control over it). This compromise has been grossly perverted over the years.

The media companies would like nothing more than to ensure you pay - and they get paid - for every second you read, listen to, watch, or use their writers', artists', actors', directors', employees', etc. creations. And they would prefer to do this without having to remunerate these intellectual property creators. Yet they will go to great lengths to tell you how you are starving the poor artist or actor by not paying your due. Just look at the napster case - the labels got millions, but they didn't want to give any to the artists (because it was outside their contracts).

If media companies use copyright protection mechanisms, they must be REQUIRED by law to provide inexpensive (free) ways of obtaining fair use. Otherwise it is unconstitutional and illegal due to the imbalance of power it creates.

Now back to the question:

There are many programs that "crack" the copyright protection on DVDs. It is illegal to use or "traffic" in such "devices" except for fair use. Since it is extremely difficult for a business to demonstrate fair use if they make any profit from the endevour, the media companies have attacked ferociously any such sites under the jurisdiction of the DMCA or other such laws. So, they have effectively instituted a roadblock between fair use rights and commercial use restrictions. You have the legal right to use it for personal uses, but anyone who sells or distributes it could be prosecuted.

One of my favorite fair use DVD sites is <A HREF="http://www.riphelp.com/" target="_new">here</A>

I thought a thought, but the thought I thought wasn't the thought I thought I had thought.
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April 13, 2002 6:44:31 PM

haha... RIGHT ON! Ya i have spent the last couple of days doing some extensive searching on the web for guids and how to make "legal personal back up's" of my already purchased DVD's.... and i must say i have found plaenty of info on it and succesfully made my first back up (Gone in 60 Seconds). In short using DVD Decrypter and ifoedit gets the job done nicely.
April 14, 2002 3:56:43 AM

Wow...that was really lengthy. But, it enlightened me a lot. Great post, man. Great post... *thumbs up*

If it matters, I love this statement:
<font color=green>The media companies would like nothing more than to ensure you pay - and they get paid - for every second you read, listen to, watch, or use their writers', artists', actors', directors', employees', etc. creations. And they would prefer to do this without having to remunerate these intellectual property creators. Yet they will go to great lengths to tell you how you are starving the poor artist or actor by not paying your due. Just look at the napster case - the labels got millions, but they didn't want to give any to the artists (because it was outside their contracts).</font color=green>

And, thanks for that link to RipHelp. I'm gonna check that out to learn how to backup some DVDs. See ya...

<font color=red><A HREF="http://www.btvillarin.com" target="_new">btvillarin.com</A> - My Windows XP-based Website</font color=red>
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