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Car radio in shop?

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December 9, 2004 7:05:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I'm trying to use a car radio and CD changer, that I've had sitting around
for three years, to work in my shop at home. I don't want anything fancy
here and just wanted to use a good radio that I had sitting around. I'm
using a Kenwood deck with electronic face. So here's the problem. I've
bought myself one of those adjustable AC/DC transformers that you have the
option of selecting 5 or 6 different CD voltages (Used with calculators)
when I test the power I am getting 12 V but the deck unit face just flashes
erratically and doesn't do anything. Is the unit shot or what am I doing
wrong?

More about : car radio shop

Anonymous
December 9, 2004 7:05:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On 12/9/2004 13:05, HotRod wrote:

> I'm trying to use a car radio and CD changer, that I've had sitting around
> for three years, to work in my shop at home. I don't want anything fancy
> here and just wanted to use a good radio that I had sitting around. I'm
> using a Kenwood deck with electronic face. So here's the problem. I've
> bought myself one of those adjustable AC/DC transformers that you have the
> option of selecting 5 or 6 different CD voltages (Used with calculators)
> when I test the power I am getting 12 V but the deck unit face just flashes
> erratically and doesn't do anything. Is the unit shot or what am I doing
> wrong?

Have a look at the power rating of the power supply (something like
500mA or 800mA, etc.) then look at the power draw requirements for
the radio. I'm guessing you'll find the radio draws far, far more
than you can supply with a simple calculator power supply.
December 9, 2004 8:20:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Will do, any suggestions on how to power this in my shop?


"Mark Hansen" <meh@NOSPAMunify.com> wrote in message
news:10rhjejkpm0c774@corp.supernews.com...
> On 12/9/2004 13:05, HotRod wrote:
>
>> I'm trying to use a car radio and CD changer, that I've had sitting
>> around for three years, to work in my shop at home. I don't want anything
>> fancy here and just wanted to use a good radio that I had sitting around.
>> I'm using a Kenwood deck with electronic face. So here's the problem.
>> I've bought myself one of those adjustable AC/DC transformers that you
>> have the option of selecting 5 or 6 different CD voltages (Used with
>> calculators) when I test the power I am getting 12 V but the deck unit
>> face just flashes erratically and doesn't do anything. Is the unit shot
>> or what am I doing wrong?
>
> Have a look at the power rating of the power supply (something like
> 500mA or 800mA, etc.) then look at the power draw requirements for
> the radio. I'm guessing you'll find the radio draws far, far more
> than you can supply with a simple calculator power supply.
Related resources
Anonymous
December 9, 2004 8:20:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On 12/9/2004 14:20, HotRod wrote:

> Will do, any suggestions on how to power this in my shop?

The simplest thing to do would be to get a car battery,
and a charger. However, they do make power supplies that can
drive automotive loads, but they can get pricey.

Basically, if the radio says that it draws 2 Amps, then you
need to get a 12volt power supply that can handle a 2 Amp draw
(it would be safer to get one that can handle more than that,
such as 2.5Amp or so...).

In the long run, it will probably be cheaper to by a cheap
shelf system (which is why you don't see too many car stereo
system in people's living rooms).

>
>
> "Mark Hansen" <meh@NOSPAMunify.com> wrote in message
> news:10rhjejkpm0c774@corp.supernews.com...
>> On 12/9/2004 13:05, HotRod wrote:
>>
>>> I'm trying to use a car radio and CD changer, that I've had sitting
>>> around for three years, to work in my shop at home. I don't want anything
>>> fancy here and just wanted to use a good radio that I had sitting around.
>>> I'm using a Kenwood deck with electronic face. So here's the problem.
>>> I've bought myself one of those adjustable AC/DC transformers that you
>>> have the option of selecting 5 or 6 different CD voltages (Used with
>>> calculators) when I test the power I am getting 12 V but the deck unit
>>> face just flashes erratically and doesn't do anything. Is the unit shot
>>> or what am I doing wrong?
>>
>> Have a look at the power rating of the power supply (something like
>> 500mA or 800mA, etc.) then look at the power draw requirements for
>> the radio. I'm guessing you'll find the radio draws far, far more
>> than you can supply with a simple calculator power supply.
>
>


--
Mark Hansen
PP-ASEL, C-172M/G
December 10, 2004 12:00:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"HotRod" <NOSPAM@youremail.com> wrote in message
news:10rhj0tc7mqoq72@corp.supernews.com...
> I'm trying to use a car radio and CD changer, that I've had sitting
> around for three years, to work in my shop at home. I don't want
> anything fancy here and just wanted to use a good radio that I had
> sitting around. I'm using a Kenwood deck with electronic face. So
> here's the problem. I've bought myself one of those adjustable
> AC/DC transformers that you have the option of selecting 5 or 6
> different CD voltages (Used with calculators) when I test the power
> I am getting 12 V but the deck unit face just flashes erratically
> and doesn't do anything. Is the unit shot or what am I doing wrong?
Simple, not enough current.
I have an old car radio (from my 1983 Honda) in the bathroom. It
drives a RadioShack Minimus 7 (white) speaker on top of the medicine
cabinet. It is powered from a surplus instrumentation power supply
that I have tweaked to 15 VDC (an on-charge car battery can be 14
volts or so.) The radio takes about an amp or so by my guess (not
measured) but the supply will deliver over 4 amps.
The radio sits vertically in a draw in the vanity (I made a simple
stainless steel strip to support it), the P/S is underneath the basin
on the vanity base.
Works great! Push button, too.
Cheers
Roger
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 12:04:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Most of the replies thus far have been great, and correct. You need more
amps in your supply.

Go to Radio Shack and tell them you need a 12v supply that will power a car
radio. My guess is that it would be around 3 or 4 amps. You don't need
anything much bigger.

The idea about a pc supply is a good one too.


You might post a "want to buy" message in



rec.radio.swap


They sell and buy zillions of things..............


--James--
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 1:31:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"HotRod" <NOSPAM@youremail.com> wrote in
news:10rhj0tc7mqoq72@corp.supernews.com:

> I've
> bought myself one of those adjustable AC/DC transformers that you
> have the option of selecting 5 or 6 different CD voltages (Used with
> calculators) when I test the power I am getting 12 V but the deck unit
> face just flashes erratically and doesn't do anything. Is the unit
> shot or what am I doing wrong?
>

Probably not enough amps - Car radios use quite a bit of power.

Try a HAM Radio power supply instead... they can easily produce 20 -50+
amps. But at that price, it might be cheaper to buy yourself a real radio.

--
Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 3:02:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Thu, 9 Dec 2004 16:05:39 -0500, "HotRod" <NOSPAM@youremail.com>
wrote:

>I'm trying to use a car radio and CD changer, that I've had sitting around
>for three years, to work in my shop at home. I don't want anything fancy
>here and just wanted to use a good radio that I had sitting around. I'm
>using a Kenwood deck with electronic face. So here's the problem. I've
>bought myself one of those adjustable AC/DC transformers that you have the
>option of selecting 5 or 6 different CD voltages (Used with calculators)
>when I test the power I am getting 12 V but the deck unit face just flashes
>erratically and doesn't do anything. Is the unit shot or what am I doing
>wrong?


You're using a power supply that delivers the right voltage, but an
inadequate amperage. Probably your best route is to pick up a
second-hand mains-powered hi-fi system. Something as good as a car
unit won't be expensive.
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 3:02:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

if you have an extra one, a computer power supply will power a car radio and
cd changer no problem.

use one of the 4 drive plugs, yellow for 12+ and black for ground, red is
5+.


"Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:aophr01ndlo2488f3l83iv40uno2p9m1t3@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 9 Dec 2004 16:05:39 -0500, "HotRod" <NOSPAM@youremail.com>
> wrote:
>
> >I'm trying to use a car radio and CD changer, that I've had sitting
around
> >for three years, to work in my shop at home. I don't want anything fancy
> >here and just wanted to use a good radio that I had sitting around. I'm
> >using a Kenwood deck with electronic face. So here's the problem. I've
> >bought myself one of those adjustable AC/DC transformers that you have
the
> >option of selecting 5 or 6 different CD voltages (Used with calculators)
> >when I test the power I am getting 12 V but the deck unit face just
flashes
> >erratically and doesn't do anything. Is the unit shot or what am I doing
> >wrong?
>
>
> You're using a power supply that delivers the right voltage, but an
> inadequate amperage. Probably your best route is to pick up a
> second-hand mains-powered hi-fi system. Something as good as a car
> unit won't be expensive.
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 9:30:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Ps1k0" <ps1k0@cox.net> wrote in message
news:8B6ud.1842$jn.519@lakeread06

> if you have an extra one, a computer power supply will power a car
> radio and cd changer no problem.

> use one of the 4 drive plugs, yellow for 12+ and black for ground,
> red is 5+.

I can confirm that this will work. If the 12 volt line is low, add a
resistor load to the +5 output.
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 10:29:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"James Nipper" <jnipper@fdn.com> wrote in news:ENWdnWGlqs6CmSTcRVn-
ug@comcast.com:

> The idea about a pc supply is a good one too.

Only problem with the PC supply is that new power supplies won't turn on
unless there is a special low-voltage trigger.

--
Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
December 10, 2004 11:22:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I have tons of old PC's kicking around I think I'll check the voltage and
such and see if I can get one of those to work. THANKS GOOD IDEAS
Anonymous
December 10, 2004 9:31:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Thu, 9 Dec 2004 20:02:54 -0500, "Ps1k0" <ps1k0@cox.net> wrote:

>
>if you have an extra one, a computer power supply will power a car radio and
>cd changer no problem.
>
>use one of the 4 drive plugs, yellow for 12+ and black for ground, red is
>5+.

If it's an older AT psu this will work easily. If a newer ATX one,
you'll have to work out how to switch it on. Maybe not a sensible
project for someone who knows so little about electrical basics?
Anonymous
December 11, 2004 6:00:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

And to think I just sold an AC->DC power converter on ebay we used in our
shop. Had a max output of 80a and we had an MP3 deck, a Fosgate amp with
sub, and XM radio connected to it. Sold it on eBay for like $90.

"Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:aophr01ndlo2488f3l83iv40uno2p9m1t3@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 9 Dec 2004 16:05:39 -0500, "HotRod" <NOSPAM@youremail.com>
> wrote:
>
>>I'm trying to use a car radio and CD changer, that I've had sitting around
>>for three years, to work in my shop at home. I don't want anything fancy
>>here and just wanted to use a good radio that I had sitting around. I'm
>>using a Kenwood deck with electronic face. So here's the problem. I've
>>bought myself one of those adjustable AC/DC transformers that you have
>>the
>>option of selecting 5 or 6 different CD voltages (Used with calculators)
>>when I test the power I am getting 12 V but the deck unit face just
>>flashes
>>erratically and doesn't do anything. Is the unit shot or what am I doing
>>wrong?
>
>
> You're using a power supply that delivers the right voltage, but an
> inadequate amperage. Probably your best route is to pick up a
> second-hand mains-powered hi-fi system. Something as good as a car
> unit won't be expensive.
December 13, 2004 2:32:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Ps1K0

I owe you, I pulled the power supply from an old PC and it works great,
another plus is that it now leaves me with a great 12V power supply for
testing any other automotive related equipment I wants THANKS
Anonymous
December 13, 2004 9:06:42 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 11:32:14 -0500, "HotRod" <NOSPAM@youremail.com>
wrote:

> I owe you, I pulled the power supply from an old PC and it works great,
>another plus is that it now leaves me with a great 12V power supply for
>testing any other automotive related equipment I wants THANKS

Don't try testing a starter motor though :-) Some auto things want
LOTS of amps.
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 6:01:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:rnqjr05jsfp941dss518u3tv6j4pu7v3tc@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 9 Dec 2004 20:02:54 -0500, "Ps1k0" <ps1k0@cox.net> wrote:
>
>>
>>if you have an extra one, a computer power supply will power a car radio
>>and
>>cd changer no problem.
>>
>>use one of the 4 drive plugs, yellow for 12+ and black for ground, red is
>>5+.
>
> If it's an older AT psu this will work easily. If a newer ATX one,
> you'll have to work out how to switch it on. Maybe not a sensible
> project for someone who knows so little about electrical basics?

jump green to black.. how much prerequisite knoweledge is there to that?
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 9:59:12 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Dark1" <betterask4it@ifyouwantit.com> wrote in message
news:0U6wd.79$8w3.64@fe2.columbus.rr.com
> "Laurence Payne" <l@laurenceDELETEpayne.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in
> message news:rnqjr05jsfp941dss518u3tv6j4pu7v3tc@4ax.com...
>> On Thu, 9 Dec 2004 20:02:54 -0500, "Ps1k0" <ps1k0@cox.net> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> if you have an extra one, a computer power supply will power a car
>>> radio and
>>> cd changer no problem.
>>>
>>> use one of the 4 drive plugs, yellow for 12+ and black for ground,
>>> red is 5+.
>>
>> If it's an older AT psu this will work easily. If a newer ATX one,
>> you'll have to work out how to switch it on. Maybe not a sensible
>> project for someone who knows so little about electrical basics?
>
> jump green to black.. how much prerequisite knoweledge is there to
> that?

This works, though the actual color of the wires is not chiseled in stone.

The *universal* answer is to connect the wire for pin 14 to pin 13, per this
diagram:

http://xtronics.com/reference/atx_pinout.htm.

An unbent paper clip will do the job for a quick test.

This is almost a totally fail-safe operation because if you short the wrong
pins, the power supply simply never turns on, and the remaining pins remain
unenergized. Pin 13 is itself obviously short-circuit protected. ;-)

Indeed, I would like to see some prognostications about how someone could
damage a power supply making a mistake in this operation, without resorting
to some external source of power.
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 11:58:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.equipment,rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 03:01:16 GMT, "Dark1"
<betterask4it@ifyouwantit.com> wrote:

>> If it's an older AT psu this will work easily. If a newer ATX one,
>> you'll have to work out how to switch it on. Maybe not a sensible
>> project for someone who knows so little about electrical basics?
>
>jump green to black.. how much prerequisite knoweledge is there to that?

You can get quite a good flash out of a computer psu if you try out a
wrong connection before finding the right one. Never underestimate
the cack-handedness of a novice. Or of someone with a little
experience, come to that :-)
!