Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Desktop getting 169.254 even though network is fine

Last response: in Networking
Share
April 23, 2012 5:43:15 PM

Hi All,

I have a strange networking problem I was hoping you guys can help resolve. I lost my internet connection after I set my system up for an image backup, left the house and returned. Here’s how my home network is configured:

Cable internet -> Cisco modem/wireless router combo -> Dlink wireless router-turned-switch -> my computer

My computer, which is hardwired, was coming up with a 169.254. My phone, iPad and laptop were still able to connect to the Dlink signal and surf the net with no problems. I connected the laptop to the Dlink via Ethernet – OK. I connected the laptop the Ethernet cable leading to my desktop – OK. So now I isolated the problem to my desktop. I rebooted, released and renewed IP and still 169.254. I went ahead to force a manual IP address and it worked! Reverted TCPIP back to “obtain address automatically” and got a 169.254.

I’m completely stumped what could have gone wrong. In the meantime I’ve assigned an IP address till I can figure out what happening. Can anyone help with this?

TIA!
April 23, 2012 11:24:25 PM

Are you using MAC assignments in your DNS settings?

Are you sure you did not have a static IP address before?
m
0
l
April 24, 2012 5:17:58 PM

Make sure DHCP is only turned on in one of your routers.
m
0
l
Related resources
April 25, 2012 3:40:10 PM

Thanks for the suggestions guys.

@PhilFrisbie - Not using MAC assignments for my DNS and not static for sure. I had to switch to static in order to get web access.

@Hawkeye22 - Double checked that DHCP was only enabled on the Cisco and not the Dlink.
m
0
l
April 25, 2012 7:15:14 PM

Hrmmm... the first answer of this post may be able to help you. I know it says vista, but 7 is very similar. It starts like this:

When a DHCP client boots up, it first looks for a DHCP server in order to obtain an IP address and subnet mask. If the client is unable to find the information, it uses APIPA (Automatic Private IP Addressing) a feature in Windows Vista to automatically configure itself with an IP address and subnet mask when a DHCP server isn't available. The IP address range is 169.254.0.1 through 169.254.255.254, a range that has been reserved especially for Microsoft.

If a Windows Vista computer fails to get an IP address from DHCP Server, then you may have to confirm if the DHCP Server supports the BROADCAST flag.

To resolve this issue, disable the DHCP BROADCAST flag in Windows Vista. To do this, follow these steps:...


http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/window...

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/928233
m
0
l
April 25, 2012 7:49:37 PM

Thanks Hawkeye, I'll give it a try.
m
0
l
!