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What audio formats do car CD players play?

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Anonymous
January 2, 2005 1:38:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Hello All

Besides PCM type CDA files, anyone know what other audio formats modern car
CD players can handle?

Thanks

Bob
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 1:05:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Bob Alan" wrote ...
> Besides PCM type CDA files, anyone know what other audio
> formats modern car CD players can handle?

The only thing you can assume is that players will read commercially
pressed Red-book audio CDs.

Note that "CDA files" don't exist and are a creation of Microsoft
to make it convienent to see the content of a Red-book audio disc.
The Red-book standard is really just a stream of data with an
index to show where each song starts.

Some (many?) players (car as well as home) have a hard time
playing writable discs, particularly re-writable ones. Sometimes
you can find a particular brand of writable disks that your particular
player will read reliably.

Same with video discs. Over at the website www.videohelp.com
there is an epic compatibility table showing which models will play
what kinds of discs. I don't know that there is a similar data source
for audio discs, but I mention this as an example that not every
device will read evey possible kind of disc.

It is entirely safe and reasonable to assume that NO player will
read MP3 unless it specifically says so. At this time, it would
appear that units that read MP3 are still a tiny minority. I've
never heard of a car player that would play any other file type
(WMA, Ogg Vorbis, etc.)
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 6:21:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Bob Alan wrote:
> Hello All
>
> Besides PCM type CDA files, anyone know what other audio formats modern car
> CD players can handle?
>
> Thanks
>
> Bob
>
>
>
>


Depends on the player. Some older players may not
even play CD-R/RW let alone MP3/WMA disks. You'll
need to look into the CD player. I would have thought
it'd be something you'd have to buy a new CD player
for because I doubt the custom fitted one by the car
manufacturer would play MP3 CDs (I can't say I've
ever seen one which does).

For the record, 'files' don't exist on pure audio CDs
(it doesn't have an ISO CD file system unless it's one
of those video CDs). Data is stored as pure PCM on
the CD tracks, Windows interprets audio CDs so you
can double click on an icon and load the cda file
with your player. So unless your player knows about
actual file systems it will not be able to play
'data' disks.

--
Regards,
Aaron.
Related resources
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 7:04:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Bob Alan" <t4@soalex.us> wrote in message
news:HfKBd.5616$Tf5.5546@lakeread03...
> Hello All
>
> Besides PCM type CDA files, anyone know what other audio formats modern
> car
> CD players can handle?

**Mine does MP3 a treat. As always, however, expect such compatibilities to
be well documented in the advertising material.


--
Trevor Wilson
www.rageaudio.com.au
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 8:01:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Thanks all, and particualary Richard and Aaron, for the info.

My DBS provider just added a few Serius channels. I wanted to computer
record some of it via the "line in" as MP3 files then xfer it to a CD that
the car could play. Guess this is not going to be as easy as I thought.
Been using Tapes but that seems so yesterday.

Bob




"Richard Crowley" <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote in message
news:10tgdv8jk1t03d5@corp.supernews.com...
"Bob Alan" wrote ...
> Besides PCM type CDA files, anyone know what other audio
> formats modern car CD players can handle?

The only thing you can assume is that players will read commercially
pressed Red-book audio CDs.

Note that "CDA files" don't exist and are a creation of Microsoft
to make it convienent to see the content of a Red-book audio disc.
The Red-book standard is really just a stream of data with an
index to show where each song starts.

Some (many?) players (car as well as home) have a hard time
playing writable discs, particularly re-writable ones. Sometimes
you can find a particular brand of writable disks that your particular
player will read reliably.

Same with video discs. Over at the website www.videohelp.com
there is an epic compatibility table showing which models will play
what kinds of discs. I don't know that there is a similar data source
for audio discs, but I mention this as an example that not every
device will read evey possible kind of disc.

It is entirely safe and reasonable to assume that NO player will
read MP3 unless it specifically says so. At this time, it would
appear that units that read MP3 are still a tiny minority. I've
never heard of a car player that would play any other file type
(WMA, Ogg Vorbis, etc.)
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 5:40:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Bob Alan wrote:
> Thanks all, and particualary Richard and Aaron, for the info.
>
> My DBS provider just added a few Serius channels. I wanted to computer
> record some of it via the "line in" as MP3 files then xfer it to a CD that
> the car could play. Guess this is not going to be as easy as I thought.
> Been using Tapes but that seems so yesterday.

You could get one of those tape->line connectors and use a mini disk
or MP3 player. Infact you could even use a portable CD player which
have the features you want.

Another idea is something like a portable FM transmitter connected
to your portable thing. You then just have to tune your car's stereo
to the frequency.

> Bob
>

--
Regards,
Aaron.
Anonymous
January 12, 2005 6:30:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

>
>Hello All
>
>Besides PCM type CDA files, anyone know what other audio formats modern car
>CD players can handle?
>
>Thanks
>
>Bob
>
>

That's generally it for factory installed units.

After market units are another thing altogether.
Richard H. Kuschel
"I canna change the law of physics."-----Scotty
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 2:17:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I always thought AIFF was the universal format...I have been burning
discs with that and nobody has said they don't work.
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 5:51:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

thepaganjournalist wrote:
> I always thought AIFF was the universal format...I have been burning
> discs with that and nobody has said they don't work.
>
Universal in the Apple world:)  AIFF is the default, lossless musical
file format for Macintoshes just as WAV files are the same for Windows
PCs. When you burn an AIFF file to make a CD, your bruning software does
a simple conversion to the CD-Audio format. Same exact thing with WAV
files on PC. If you were to literally burn an AIFF or wav file to CD,
the CD would probably be in the ISO9660 format, or perhaps something
else, but not CD-Audio.

CD
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 8:39:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"thepaganjournalist" wrote...
>I always thought AIFF was the universal format...I have
> been burning discs with that and nobody has said they
> don't work.

No you haven't. You have been using software that automatically
decodes AIFF and writes Red-Book standard audio CDs.

If you were really writing data disks with AIFF files, likely nobody
but one of your Mac buddies would be able to read/play it.
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 10:34:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.car,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

>I always thought AIFF was the universal format...I have been burning
>discs with that and nobody has said they don't work.

Are you actually burning the data to CD *as* AIFF files, in some form
of computer-readable filesystem (e.g. ISO9660)? I've never heard of
anyone doing this.

I suspect that you are taking audio data files, presently in AIFF
format, and burning them to Red Book audio-CD tracks. Such tracks do
not have a file type or a fileysystem structure wrapped around them,
or contained within them... they're just the audio samples.

--
Dave Platt <dplatt@radagast.org> AE6EO
Hosting the Jade Warrior home page: http://www.radagast.org/jade-warrior
I do _not_ wish to receive unsolicited commercial email, and I will
boycott any company which has the gall to send me such ads!
Anonymous
January 21, 2005 4:16:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

>
>I always thought AIFF was the universal format...I have been burning
>discs with that and nobody has said they don't work.

Actually, you haven't been burning discs to be played with AIFF, that is the
data format within your computer. It is converted to a red book compatible pcm
format which is played on the car stereo etc.

It isn't even put on the disc in the same order that it is played back.
Reed/Soloman code randomizes and re assembles the information on the CD so that
it plays back correctly and scratches are not so much of a problem.
Richard H. Kuschel
"I canna change the law of physics."-----Scotty
!