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Luxman R-1070 receiver repair and spares

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Anonymous
January 4, 2005 1:27:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I would like to obtain some spare parts for a Luxman R-1070 receiver.

Are Luxman still trading? There is a web site but it is all in Japanese.

The parts that I want are:

a) Power on switch,

b) Volume control (strange four gang effort)

c) Input selector.

d) Light bulbs

e) The relay that connects the speakers once the unit has powered up.


(Items b and c have become very scratchy - is it possible to resuscitate them?)

--

Michael Chare
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 1:27:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Volume controls and mechanical selector switches can be cleaned and lubed
with products such as Caig De-Oxit. Technique is important; one needs to
understand where the moving and stationary contacts are inside the controls.
One sprays a bit into the control surfaces, exercises the control
vigorously, repeat. I will pack tissue around the control to control runoff,
and use an air compressor in between stages to blow out any debris loosened.
The controls seem to work better, longer this way. A common complaint about
trying to rejuvenate old controls is that the noise or erratic function
return after as little as a couple months. I have seen this happen, but only
on a few pieces.


Mark Z.


"Michael Chare" <MunderscoreNEWS@chareDOTorg.uk> wrote in message
news:ssSdnQE4ao0x8kfcRVnytQ@pipex.net...
>I would like to obtain some spare parts for a Luxman R-1070 receiver.
>
> Are Luxman still trading? There is a web site but it is all in Japanese.
>
> The parts that I want are:
>
> a) Power on switch,
>
> b) Volume control (strange four gang effort)
>
> c) Input selector.
>
> d) Light bulbs
>
> e) The relay that connects the speakers once the unit has powered up.
>
>
> (Items b and c have become very scratchy - is it possible to resuscitate
> them?)
>
> --
>
> Michael Chare
>
>
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 1:27:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Mark D. Zacharias wrote:
> Volume controls and mechanical selector switches can be cleaned and lubed
> with products such as Caig De-Oxit. Technique is important; one needs to
> understand where the moving and stationary contacts are inside the controls.
> One sprays a bit into the control surfaces, exercises the control
> vigorously, repeat. I will pack tissue around the control to control runoff,
> and use an air compressor in between stages to blow out any debris loosened.
> The controls seem to work better, longer this way. A common complaint about
> trying to rejuvenate old controls is that the noise or erratic function
> return after as little as a couple months.


I have seen this happen, but only on a few pieces.
>
(assuming your not using radio shack tuner cleaner ;)  )

I would go for broke and use the Caig pro gold.
It costs a little more than the D5, but i think it worth it.

Bob


>
> Mark Z.
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 10:54:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Mark D. Zacharias" <mzacharias@yis.us> wrote in message
news:33vbv3F4628seU1@individual.net...
> Volume controls and mechanical selector switches can be cleaned and lubed
> with products such as Caig De-Oxit. Technique is important; one needs to
> understand where the moving and stationary contacts are inside the controls.
> One sprays a bit into the control surfaces, exercises the control
> vigorously, repeat. I will pack tissue around the control to control runoff,
> and use an air compressor in between stages to blow out any debris loosened.
> The controls seem to work better, longer this way. A common complaint about
> trying to rejuvenate old controls is that the noise or erratic function
> return after as little as a couple months. I have seen this happen, but only
> on a few pieces.

I evenually gor around to buying some De-Oxit and using it. I have to say that
it is surprisingly good, and has removed all the crackle from the input selector
switch and the volume control. My Luxman receiver is now working like new, which
is good news as I don't believe that I could have bought replacement parts. Had
I known about this stuff I would have bought some years ago!

Thanks for the advice. I am always amazed at what I can learn from the
Internet.


--

Michael Chare
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 12:05:36 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I plan to try their Pro Gold soon.

mz


"Michael Chare" <MunderscoreNEWS@chareDOTorg.uk> wrote in message
news:FfednUfdTvRwinHcRVnyug@pipex.net...
> "Mark D. Zacharias" <mzacharias@yis.us> wrote in message
> news:33vbv3F4628seU1@individual.net...
>> Volume controls and mechanical selector switches can be cleaned and lubed
>> with products such as Caig De-Oxit. Technique is important; one needs to
>> understand where the moving and stationary contacts are inside the
>> controls.
>> One sprays a bit into the control surfaces, exercises the control
>> vigorously, repeat. I will pack tissue around the control to control
>> runoff,
>> and use an air compressor in between stages to blow out any debris
>> loosened.
>> The controls seem to work better, longer this way. A common complaint
>> about
>> trying to rejuvenate old controls is that the noise or erratic function
>> return after as little as a couple months. I have seen this happen, but
>> only
>> on a few pieces.
>
> I evenually gor around to buying some De-Oxit and using it. I have to say
> that
> it is surprisingly good, and has removed all the crackle from the input
> selector
> switch and the volume control. My Luxman receiver is now working like new,
> which
> is good news as I don't believe that I could have bought replacement
> parts. Had
> I known about this stuff I would have bought some years ago!
>
> Thanks for the advice. I am always amazed at what I can learn from the
> Internet.
>
>
> --
>
> Michael Chare
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 1:41:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Mark D. Zacharias" <mzacharias@yis.us> wrote in message
news:353cnsF4e37b4U1@individual.net...
> I plan to try their Pro Gold soon.

I was sent some instructions. For Potentiometers they say:

Spray a short burst (0.25 to 0.5 seconds) of DeoxIT D5 Spray with extension tube
into contact area. Operate control several times to break up oxides etc. Apply
DeoxIT D5, CaiKleen 41, CailKlean A/V or other cleaning spray (that does not
leave a residue) into contact area for 1-2 seconds to flush DeoxIT, oxides and
other contaminates from contact area. Apply ProGold (G56,G5MS,G100S), DeoxIT
(D5S D5MS, D100S) or PreservIT P5 spray to complete treatment. (For components
prone to server oxidation, repeat process a few times before applying the final
step.)


For Relay contacts, battery terminals contact bars, edge conectors, commutators
(all accessible contacts):

Using the ProGold or DeoxIR Spray, WIPES, PEN, Precision Dispenser (liquid),
apply directly onto contact surface. After a few seconds remove contamination
and excess ProGold or DeoxIR with a lint-free cloth (#LFC-C). Repeat until
linf-free cloth appears to be free of contamination. To complete the treatment,
apply ProGold, DeoxIT or PreservIT. Wipe off all excess.


To quote "As a general rule, use ProGold for best performance on plated surfaces
and DeoxIT as a general prupose treatment."


HTH
--

Michael Chare
!