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Ripping DVD-Audio at 24-bit 96MHz?

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Anonymous
January 5, 2005 2:43:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I'm trying to rip the stereo song tracks from my DVD-Audio of Fleetwood
Mac's "Rumours". All attempts to do so yield only 16-bit AC3 files
(frequency unknown). That does me no good; I want 24-bit, 96Mhz files I
can later convert to 24-bit (and at least 48MHz) .wav files that I can
burn to CD (or DVD, if necessary).

I have an M-Delta 2496 card, Windows XP (with Windows Media Encoder
SDK), Soundforge 7.0, a freeware DVD ripping program.

(I should also mention that I can't seem to get the 2496 card to rip or
play anything other than 16-bit 44MHz audio files; the Windows XP
Soundmax internal card seems to take precedent over the 2496).
Shnaggletooth
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 9:58:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

<shnaggletooth@yahoo.com> wrote ...
> I'm trying to rip the stereo song tracks from my DVD-Audio of
> Fleetwood
> Mac's "Rumours". All attempts to do so yield only 16-bit AC3 files
> (frequency unknown). That does me no good; I want 24-bit, 96Mhz files
> I
> can later convert to 24-bit (and at least 48MHz) .wav files that I can
> burn to CD (or DVD, if necessary).
>
> I have an M-Delta 2496 card, Windows XP (with Windows Media Encoder
> SDK), Soundforge 7.0, a freeware DVD ripping program.
>
> (I should also mention that I can't seem to get the 2496 card to rip
> or
> play anything other than 16-bit 44MHz audio files; the Windows XP
> Soundmax internal card seems to take precedent over the 2496).
> Shnaggletooth

If by "ripping" you literally mean recovering the digital bitstream
from the original, then you get whatever they encoded it for.
"Ripping" to a higher sample rate or word-length is undefined.
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 11:06:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Richard Crowley wrote:
snip
>
> If by "ripping" you literally mean recovering the digital bitstream
> from the original, then you get whatever they encoded it for.
> "Ripping" to a higher sample rate or word-length is undefined.

I'm trying to rip the high resolution stereo stream that's in the
DVD-Audio (because I don't have a DVD-Audio player), which should be
24-bit, 192Khz. Those I think are the AOM files in the audio folder of
the DVD. The most I can do so far is rip the 16-bit 48Khz Dolby Digital
AC3 stream from the VOB files in the video folder.

Shnaggletooth
January 5, 2005 5:38:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

<shnaggletooth@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1104911008.952764.285100@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> I'm trying to rip the stereo song tracks from my DVD-Audio of Fleetwood
> Mac's "Rumours". All attempts to do so yield only 16-bit AC3 files
> (frequency unknown). That does me no good; I want 24-bit, 96Mhz files I
> can later convert to 24-bit (and at least 48MHz) .wav files that I can
> burn to CD (or DVD, if necessary).
>
> I have an M-Delta 2496 card, Windows XP (with Windows Media Encoder
> SDK), Soundforge 7.0, a freeware DVD ripping program.
>
> (I should also mention that I can't seem to get the 2496 card to rip or
> play anything other than 16-bit 44MHz audio files; the Windows XP
> Soundmax internal card seems to take precedent over the 2496).
> Shnaggletooth

The Creative Audigy 2 records up to 96khz sampling rate and 24bits if that's
what you want. You have quoted figures of 96Mhz and 44Mhz which do not
exist.

Paul
Anonymous
January 5, 2005 6:12:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

<shnaggletooth@yahoo.com> skrev i en meddelelse
news:1104911008.952764.285100@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> I'm trying to rip the stereo song tracks from my DVD-Audio of Fleetwood
> Mac's "Rumours". All attempts to do so yield only 16-bit AC3 files
> (frequency unknown). That does me no good; I want 24-bit, 96Mhz files I
> can later convert to 24-bit (and at least 48MHz) .wav files that I can
> burn to CD (or DVD, if necessary).
>
> I have an M-Delta 2496 card, Windows XP (with Windows Media Encoder
> SDK), Soundforge 7.0, a freeware DVD ripping program.
>
> (I should also mention that I can't seem to get the 2496 card to rip or
> play anything other than 16-bit 44MHz audio files; the Windows XP
> Soundmax internal card seems to take precedent over the 2496).
> Shnaggletooth
>

Damn !.

I wanna get me one of them 44MHz cards tooo. My Delta 2496 card only goes to
96kHz.

/Jakob
January 5, 2005 7:32:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

<shnaggletooth@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1104941217.856713.14150@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
> Richard Crowley wrote:
> snip
>>
>> If by "ripping" you literally mean recovering the digital bitstream
>> from the original, then you get whatever they encoded it for.
>> "Ripping" to a higher sample rate or word-length is undefined.
>
> I'm trying to rip the high resolution stereo stream that's in the
> DVD-Audio (because I don't have a DVD-Audio player), which should be
> 24-bit, 192Khz. Those I think are the AOM files in the audio folder of
> the DVD. The most I can do so far is rip the 16-bit 48Khz Dolby Digital
> AC3 stream from the VOB files in the video folder.

Have you looked at the figures on http://www.amtechdisc.com/dvdspecs.htm
?

Might help.

Paul
January 5, 2005 8:48:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On 5 Jan 2005 08:06:57 -0800, shnaggletooth@yahoo.com wrote:

>
>Richard Crowley wrote:
>snip
>>
>> If by "ripping" you literally mean recovering the digital bitstream
>> from the original, then you get whatever they encoded it for.
>> "Ripping" to a higher sample rate or word-length is undefined.
>
>I'm trying to rip the high resolution stereo stream that's in the
>DVD-Audio (because I don't have a DVD-Audio player), which should be
>24-bit, 192Khz. Those I think are the AOM files in the audio folder of
>the DVD. The most I can do so far is rip the 16-bit 48Khz Dolby Digital
>AC3 stream from the VOB files in the video folder.
>

As I understand it the DVD-Audio stream is copy protected. For
compatibilty most of them have a Dolby Digital stream which can be
played on standard DVD players, and extracted with standard DVD tools.

I don't know of any tools that can extract the high resolution stream.

Bill
Anonymous
January 6, 2005 6:03:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

<shnaggletooth@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1104941217.856713.14150@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> I'm trying to rip the high resolution stereo stream that's in the
> DVD-Audio (because I don't have a DVD-Audio player), which should be
> 24-bit, 192Khz. Those I think are the AOM files in the audio folder of
> the DVD. The most I can do so far is rip the 16-bit 48Khz Dolby Digital
> AC3 stream from the VOB files in the video folder.

Simply because that is what the software is designed to do. AFAIK no
software yet exists for ripping the high res layer. I'll bet people are
working on it though.

MrT.
Anonymous
January 9, 2005 12:27:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Richard Crowley" <rcrowley7@xprt.net> wrote in message
news:10to05jkt14v732@corp.supernews.com...
> <shnaggletooth@yahoo.com> wrote ...
>> I'm trying to rip the stereo song tracks from my DVD-Audio of Fleetwood
>> Mac's "Rumours". All attempts to do so yield only 16-bit AC3 files
>> (frequency unknown). That does me no good; I want 24-bit, 96Mhz files I
>> can later convert to 24-bit (and at least 48MHz) .wav files that I can
>> burn to CD (or DVD, if necessary).
>>
>> I have an M-Delta 2496 card, Windows XP (with Windows Media Encoder
>> SDK), Soundforge 7.0, a freeware DVD ripping program.
>>
>> (I should also mention that I can't seem to get the 2496 card to rip or
>> play anything other than 16-bit 44MHz audio files; the Windows XP
>> Soundmax internal card seems to take precedent over the 2496).
>> Shnaggletooth
>
> If by "ripping" you literally mean recovering the digital bitstream
> from the original, then you get whatever they encoded it for.
> "Ripping" to a higher sample rate or word-length is undefined.

DVD Audio Ripper lets you select the DVD's AC3 or PCM-2 audio stream.

geoff
>
Anonymous
January 9, 2005 12:28:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Geoff Wood" <geoff@nospam-paf.co.nz> wrote in message undefined.
>
> DVD Audio Ripper lets you select the DVD's AC3 or PCM-2 audio stream.
>
> geoff
>>


DVD AUdio Ripper being for ripping audio tracks of video DVDs, of course,
not of DVD-A's

geoff
Anonymous
January 11, 2005 3:07:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Mr. T wrote:
> <shnaggletooth@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1104941217.856713.14150@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> > I'm trying to rip the high resolution stereo stream that's in the
> > DVD-Audio (because I don't have a DVD-Audio player), which should
be
> > 24-bit, 192Khz. Those I think are the AOM files in the audio folder
of
> > the DVD. The most I can do so far is rip the 16-bit 48Khz Dolby
Digital
> > AC3 stream from the VOB files in the video folder.
>
> Simply because that is what the software is designed to do. AFAIK no
> software yet exists for ripping the high res layer. I'll bet people
are
> working on it though.
>
> MrT.

Check out "DVD Audio Extractor"

You can extract 16 bit, 24 bit, 5.1... you name it. Works great.

DVD Audio Extractor home page:
http://www.castudio.org/dvdaudioextractor/
January 11, 2005 11:38:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On 11 Jan 2005 12:07:00 -0800, "enaille" <enaille@hotmail.com> wrote:

>
>Mr. T wrote:
>> <shnaggletooth@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:1104941217.856713.14150@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>> > I'm trying to rip the high resolution stereo stream that's in the
>> > DVD-Audio (because I don't have a DVD-Audio player), which should
>be
>> > 24-bit, 192Khz. Those I think are the AOM files in the audio folder
>of
>> > the DVD. The most I can do so far is rip the 16-bit 48Khz Dolby
>Digital
>> > AC3 stream from the VOB files in the video folder.
>>
>> Simply because that is what the software is designed to do. AFAIK no
>> software yet exists for ripping the high res layer. I'll bet people
>are
>> working on it though.
>>
>> MrT.
>
>Check out "DVD Audio Extractor"
>
>You can extract 16 bit, 24 bit, 5.1... you name it. Works great.
>
>DVD Audio Extractor home page:
>http://www.castudio.org/dvdaudioextractor/
>
Well its web site says -

Q7: Can DVD Audio Extractor be used to extract music from DVD-Audio
discs?

Not yet. This is a known limit. DVD Audio Extractor currently only
support audios in DVD-Video discs, i.e., it reads VOB files under
VIDEO_TS directory. DVD-Audio discs store audio tracks under AUDIO_TS
directory and use different formats with DVD-Video.

Suggestion: Many DVD-Audio discs also come with an DVD-Video zone for
compatibility with DVD-Video players. In that case, you can extract
audios from them as normal DVD-Video discs.

Which seems to be saying that it will not extract high res audio from
DVD-A discs.

Bill
Anonymous
January 11, 2005 11:40:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

enaille <enaille@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Mr. T wrote:
> > <shnaggletooth@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > news:1104941217.856713.14150@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> > > I'm trying to rip the high resolution stereo stream that's in the
> > > DVD-Audio (because I don't have a DVD-Audio player), which should
> be
> > > 24-bit, 192Khz. Those I think are the AOM files in the audio folder
> of
> > > the DVD. The most I can do so far is rip the 16-bit 48Khz Dolby
> Digital
> > > AC3 stream from the VOB files in the video folder.
> >
> > Simply because that is what the software is designed to do. AFAIK no
> > software yet exists for ripping the high res layer. I'll bet people
> are
> > working on it though.
> >
> > MrT.

> Check out "DVD Audio Extractor"

> You can extract 16 bit, 24 bit, 5.1... you name it.


It won't extract DVD-Audio, at any bitrate of format, though.






--

-S
If you're a nut and knock on enough doors, eventually someone will open one,
look at you and say, Messiah, we have waited for your arrival.
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 8:58:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"enaille" <enaille@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1105474020.800412.196170@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Mr. T wrote:
> > <shnaggletooth@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > news:1104941217.856713.14150@c13g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> > > I'm trying to rip the high resolution stereo stream that's in the
> > > DVD-Audio (because I don't have a DVD-Audio player), which should
> > > 24-bit, 192Khz. Those I think are the AOM files in the audio folder
> > > the DVD. The most I can do so far is rip the 16-bit 48Khz Dolby
> > > AC3 stream from the VOB files in the video folder.

> > Simply because that is what the software is designed to do. AFAIK no
> > software yet exists for ripping the high res layer. I'll bet people
> >are working on it though.
> > MrT.

> Check out "DVD Audio Extractor"
> You can extract 16 bit, 24 bit, 5.1... you name it. Works great.
> DVD Audio Extractor home page:
> http://www.castudio.org/dvdaudioextractor/


But as I said, it won't do DVD ***AUDIO*** disks.
Someone must be working on the problem though. It's only a copyright issue
:-)

MrT.
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 3:41:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Paul wrote:

>> I have an M-Delta 2496 card, Windows XP (with Windows Media Encoder
>> SDK), Soundforge 7.0, a freeware DVD ripping program.

>> (I should also mention that I can't seem to get the 2496 card to rip or
>> play anything other than 16-bit 44MHz audio files; the Windows XP
>> Soundmax internal card seems to take precedent over the 2496).

Either - and preferably - disable the soundmax in the bios or set the AP
to be preferred device and ask xp to use only preferred devices. You can
also create a hardware profile that excludes the soundmax. Strange btw.
that you shold have that problem, the on board crystal card on this 300
Mhz Optiplex does 96-24 ....

> The Creative Audigy 2 records up to 96khz sampling rate and
> 24 bits if that's what you want.

<caveat, not absolutely sincere>

It isn't, he obviously needs the hitherto undocumented capabilities of
the AP, and I am positively convinced that its superior sound quality is
due to the higher internal sampling rate. The Audiophile cards are
simply 1000 times oversampling and thus also 1000 times better .... O;-)
..... than the card you suggest.

</caveat, not absolutely sincere>

> You have quoted figures of 96Mhz and 44Mhz which do not
> exist.

Oh, they exist, and cards that sample that fast - or something up there
in the Megahertz range are very good at filling up harddisks fast, as I
recall hearsay the Niels Bohr Institute have some hardware a la that in
their basement.

> Paul


Peter Larsen

--
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* My site is at: http://www.muyiovatki.dk *
*******************************************
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