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Question on bookshelf speaker placement

Last response: in Home Audio
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January 5, 2005 3:35:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I have two bookshelf speakers that sit towards the back of my desk,
flanking two monitors. The tweeters are a few inches below ear level.
Would it be better to tilt the speakers slightly backwards, or just
raise them up? Also, I sit close enough to the desk that I'm slightly
closer to the speakers than they are separated from each other. Is it
better to move the speakers slightly inwards (such that they are closer
to the monitors) or backwards (where the monitors might start to block
them)?
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
January 5, 2005 2:15:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Alan,

> The tweeters are a few inches below ear level. Would it be better to tilt
the speakers slightly backwards, or just raise them up? <

Raise them up, don't tilt them.

> I'm slightly closer to the speakers than they are separated <

Here's an article you may find useful - it describes how to set up a room
with the correct listening position and speaker placement:

www.realtraps.com/art_room-setup.htm

--Ethan
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
January 5, 2005 6:52:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <crg925$bg0$1@news.Stanford.EDU>, no-longer-valid@yahoo.com says...
>
>
>I have two bookshelf speakers that sit towards the back of my desk,
>flanking two monitors. The tweeters are a few inches below ear level.
>Would it be better to tilt the speakers slightly backwards, or just
>raise them up? Also, I sit close enough to the desk that I'm slightly
>closer to the speakers than they are separated from each other. Is it
>better to move the speakers slightly inwards (such that they are closer
>to the monitors) or backwards (where the monitors might start to block
>them)?

Why not try it and see which way works best? Moving small speakers around
is very easy and you can eaisly compare results and then decide for yourself
which way sounds best to you.
-------------
Alex
Related resources
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
January 5, 2005 11:14:15 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

alan wrote:
>
> I have two bookshelf speakers that sit towards the back of my desk,
> flanking two monitors. The tweeters are a few inches below ear level.
> Would it be better to tilt the speakers slightly backwards, or just
> raise them up? Also, I sit close enough to the desk that I'm slightly

Probably, but see below...

> closer to the speakers than they are separated from each other. Is it
> better to move the speakers slightly inwards (such that they are closer
> to the monitors) or backwards (where the monitors might start to block
> them)?

They may be positioned horizontally best where they are but...

You are dealing with a "Near field" type arrangement which
depends on things a little different than a full room type setup.
In a near field arrangment (like a full room setup), you want to
avoid blocking the direct signal. The speakers CAN be set too far
apart if you are really trying to tweek'em.

The great advantage to your setup is thaa it is easy to
experiment with :-) Get two friends to come over and just hold
them in a couple of positions while you listen. You will be able
to tell very quickly what the "best" position is for you.

- Jef
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
January 8, 2005 2:04:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Steven,

> In the latter case, would the theoretical ideal be to place the front
speakers 7.6 from the front wall? <

That's a great question and I don't have a good answer for you. One other
influencing factor is the distance between the speakers and the side walls.
Maybe you could aim to put each speaker 38% of the way in from each wall,
but that may put the speakers too close together or too far apart - it
depends on how wide the room is. The reason I showed varying "axis lines"
for the speakers is to adjust them along those lines for the flattest
*measured* response. I use the ETF software (www.acoustisoft.com) which lets
you run such tests easily.

--Ethan
!