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USB on DirectTV

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July 5, 2005 10:21:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

I read somewhere that it is possible to "activate" the presently
non-functional USBs on my Hughes 40 DirectTV Tivo. How difficult is it to
do that?

Is there another, easier, way to transfer material between this Tivo and a
PC?

Thanks.

--

Jeff Stevens
Email address deliberately false to avoid spam
jeff@stevens.com

More about : usb directtv

Anonymous
July 6, 2005 2:40:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

On 2005-07-05, Jeff <jeff@falsepart.com> wrote:
> I read somewhere that it is possible to "activate" the presently
> non-functional USBs on my Hughes 40 DirectTV Tivo. How difficult is it to
> do that?

How comfortable are you with doing computer stuff (opening up cases,
swapping hard drives, following command-line instructions, etc.) If this
is something you're used to, hacking your DTiVo is trivial. If this is
something that scares you, then it could be difficult and dangerous.

> Is there another, easier, way to transfer material between this Tivo and a
> PC?

There are others, but this is by far the easiest.

--
This is my .sig
July 6, 2005 2:40:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In news:11cm330d98cu60f@corp.supernews.com,
Mike Hunt <in2sheep@yahoo.com> posted:
| | On 2005-07-05, Jeff <jeff@falsepart.com> wrote:
| | | I read somewhere that it is possible to "activate" the presently
| | | non-functional USBs on my Hughes 40 DirectTV Tivo. How difficult
| | | is it to do that?
| |
| | How comfortable are you with doing computer stuff (opening up cases,
| | swapping hard drives, following command-line instructions, etc.)
| | If this is something you're used to, hacking your DTiVo is trivial.
| | If this is something that scares you, then it could be difficult
| | and dangerous.

I've opened many a PC case, instaled HDs, etc. But I've never opened a TIVO
box and have no experience with Linux.

Are their step by step instructions to do this?

| | | Is there another, easier, way to transfer material between this
| | | Tivo and a PC?
| |
| | There are others, but this is by far the easiest.

Like what?

--

Jeff Stevens
Email address deliberately false to avoid spam
jeff@stevens.com
Related resources
July 6, 2005 2:52:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

I heard a rumor that DirectTivo was planning to enable the USB ports in
2005. Has that happened? Did the 6.2 upgrades make the USB ports
functional?

--

Jeff Stevens
Email address deliberately false to avoid spam
jeff@stevens.com
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 3:24:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

"Mike Hunt" <in2sheep@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:11cm330d98cu60f@corp.supernews.com...
> On 2005-07-05, Jeff <jeff@falsepart.com> wrote:
> > I read somewhere that it is possible to "activate" the presently
> > non-functional USBs on my Hughes 40 DirectTV Tivo. How difficult is it to
> > do that?
>
> How comfortable are you with doing computer stuff (opening up cases,
> swapping hard drives, following command-line instructions, etc.) If this
> is something you're used to, hacking your DTiVo is trivial. If this is
> something that scares you, then it could be difficult and dangerous.
>
> > Is there another, easier, way to transfer material between this Tivo and a
> > PC?
>
> There are others, but this is by far the easiest.
>

If the PC has a video card that can accept R/W/Y input cables, the easiest
way to transfer video is to play it back at the DVR while recording on the PC.
This method works well transferring programs to video tape.
No modification of the DVR is needed.
July 6, 2005 3:24:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In news:eFEye.745$6%2.396@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com,
Jack Ak <akjack@excite.com> posted:

| | If the PC has a video card that can accept R/W/Y input cables, the
| | easiest
| | way to transfer video is to play it back at the DVR while recording
| | on the PC.
| | This method works well transferring programs to video tape.
| | No modification of the DVR is needed.

Now that sounds interesting. Unfortunately none of my PCs have that. They
have outlets for speakers but not for Red/white/yellow cables. I'll see if
I can find a cheap card that has that.

--

Jeff Stevens
Email address deliberately false to avoid spam
jeff@stevens.com
July 6, 2005 3:24:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In news:eFEye.745$6%2.396@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com,
Jack Ak <akjack@excite.com> posted:
| | If the PC has a video card that can accept R/W/Y input cables, the
| | easiest
| | way to transfer video is to play it back at the DVR while recording
| | on the PC.
| | This method works well transferring programs to video tape.
| | No modification of the DVR is needed.

I found that my laptop has a "S-video port allows you to play DVD audio
and video on a projector or TV that accepts audio/video inputs". Would that
work have the right signal to transfer video material from the laptop to the
Tivo or a DVD recorder or VCR tape?

--

Jeff Stevens
Email address deliberately false to avoid spam
jeff@stevens.com
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 7:03:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

On 2005-07-06, Jeff <jeff@falsepart.com> wrote:
> In news:eFEye.745$6%2.396@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com,
> Jack Ak <akjack@excite.com> posted:
>| | If the PC has a video card that can accept R/W/Y input cables, the
>| | easiest
>| | way to transfer video is to play it back at the DVR while recording
>| | on the PC.
>| | This method works well transferring programs to video tape.
>| | No modification of the DVR is needed.
>
> I found that my laptop has a "S-video port allows you to play DVD audio
> and video on a projector or TV that accepts audio/video inputs". Would that
> work have the right signal to transfer video material from the laptop to the
> Tivo or a DVD recorder or VCR tape?

That can be used to transfer material from the laptop to a SA TiVo, DVD
recorder or a VCR. It is output only from the laptop. It is not an
input so this can't be used to transfer data from something to the laptop.

--
This is my .sig
July 6, 2005 9:16:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In article <eFEye.745$6%2.396@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com>, "Jack Ak" <akjack@excite.com> wrote:
>
>"Mike Hunt" <in2sheep@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:11cm330d98cu60f@corp.supernews.com...
>> On 2005-07-05, Jeff <jeff@falsepart.com> wrote:
>> > I read somewhere that it is possible to "activate" the presently
>> > non-functional USBs on my Hughes 40 DirectTV Tivo. How difficult is it to
>> > do that?
>>
>> How comfortable are you with doing computer stuff (opening up cases,
>> swapping hard drives, following command-line instructions, etc.) If this
>> is something you're used to, hacking your DTiVo is trivial. If this is
>> something that scares you, then it could be difficult and dangerous.
>>
>> > Is there another, easier, way to transfer material between this Tivo and a
>> > PC?
>>
>> There are others, but this is by far the easiest.
>>
>
>If the PC has a video card that can accept R/W/Y input cables, the easiest
>way to transfer video is to play it back at the DVR while recording on the PC.
>This method works well transferring programs to video tape.
>No modification of the DVR is needed.
>
Anyone who advises one to copy from the Tivo to a computer using a composite
connection should be tarred and feathered. Why use composite when s-video
(Y/C) is available?
July 6, 2005 9:26:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In article <U_Gye.14165$Tf5.10691@newsread1.mlpsca01.us.to.verio.net>, "Jeff"
<jeff@falsepart.com> wrote:
>In news:11cm330d98cu60f@corp.supernews.com,
>Mike Hunt <in2sheep@yahoo.com> posted:
>| | On 2005-07-05, Jeff <jeff@falsepart.com> wrote:
>| | | I read somewhere that it is possible to "activate" the presently
>| | | non-functional USBs on my Hughes 40 DirectTV Tivo. How difficult
>| | | is it to do that?
>| |
>| | How comfortable are you with doing computer stuff (opening up cases,
>| | swapping hard drives, following command-line instructions, etc.)
>| | If this is something you're used to, hacking your DTiVo is trivial.
>| | If this is something that scares you, then it could be difficult
>| | and dangerous.
>
>I've opened many a PC case, instaled HDs, etc. But I've never opened a TIVO
>box and have no experience with Linux.
>
>Are their step by step instructions to do this?
>
>| | | Is there another, easier, way to transfer material between this
>| | | Tivo and a PC?
>| |
>| | There are others, but this is by far the easiest.
>
>Like what?
>

"Good place to learn on how to upgrade to larger hard drive"
http://www.newreleasesvideo.com/hinsdale-how-to/index9....


"This is a good place for inside pics of the tivo, but do not use any of the
hacking instructions here, they are ancient by todays standard and very
obsolete."
http://www.weethet.nl/english/tivo_dtv2_hacksleeper.php...


"readup on the newer hacking info here"
http://www.dealdatabase.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3846...
July 6, 2005 11:09:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In news:11cmif5jncvmpfc@corp.supernews.com,
Mike Hunt <in2sheep@yahoo.com> posted:
| | That can be used to transfer material from the laptop to a SA TiVo,
| | DVD recorder or a VCR. It is output only from the laptop. It is
| | not an input so this can't be used to transfer data from something
| | to the laptop.

Thanks.

--

Jeff Stevens
Email address deliberately false to avoid spam
jeff@stevens.com
July 6, 2005 11:10:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In news:D afq4p$iuo$1@news.xmission.com,
GMAN <glenzabr@xmission.com> posted:
| |
| | "Good place to learn on how to upgrade to larger hard drive"
| | http://www.newreleasesvideo.com/hinsdale-how-to/index9....
| |
| |
| | "This is a good place for inside pics of the tivo, but do not use
| | any of the hacking instructions here, they are ancient by todays
| | standard and very obsolete."
| | http://www.weethet.nl/english/tivo_dtv2_hacksleeper.php...
| |
| |
| | "readup on the newer hacking info here"
| | http://www.dealdatabase.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3846...

Thanks.

--

Jeff Stevens
Email address deliberately false to avoid spam
jeff@stevens.com
July 7, 2005 7:08:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In article <biPye.14372$Tf5.13203@newsread1.mlpsca01.us.to.verio.net>, "Jeff" <jeff@falsepart.com> wrote:
>In news:D afq4p$iuo$1@news.xmission.com,
>GMAN <glenzabr@xmission.com> posted:
>| |
>| | "Good place to learn on how to upgrade to larger hard drive"
>| | http://www.newreleasesvideo.com/hinsdale-how-to/index9....
>| |
>| |
>| | "This is a good place for inside pics of the tivo, but do not use
>| | any of the hacking instructions here, they are ancient by todays
>| | standard and very obsolete."
>| | http://www.weethet.nl/english/tivo_dtv2_hacksleeper.php...
>| |
>| |
>| | "readup on the newer hacking info here"
>| | http://www.dealdatabase.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3846...
>
>Thanks.
>
Very welcome!
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 10:46:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In article <dafph6$imt$2@news.xmission.com>,
GMAN <glenzabr@xmission.com> wrote:
>Anyone who advises one to copy from the Tivo to a computer using a composite
>connection should be tarred and feathered. Why use composite when s-video
>(Y/C) is available?

Because in some cases the composite can apparently result in better picture?

I say this with no firsthand knowledge, but at least regarding standalone
DVD recorders, many people who are far far pickier about video than I am
have said that at least in some cases, using composite results in a better
picture. This is people on the avsforum.com DVD recorder section.
--
mattack@gmail.com
Anonymous
July 8, 2005 10:47:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In article <dafq4p$iuo$1@news.xmission.com>,
GMAN <glenzabr@xmission.com> wrote:
>"Good place to learn on how to upgrade to larger hard drive"
>http://www.newreleasesvideo.com/hinsdale-how-to/index9....

But he wasn't asking about installing a larger hard drive, he was asking
about using the USB ports.
--
mattack@gmail.com
July 9, 2005 12:32:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In article <danace$spb$1@vax.hanford.org>, mattack@gmail.com wrote:
>In article <dafq4p$iuo$1@news.xmission.com>,
>GMAN <glenzabr@xmission.com> wrote:
>>"Good place to learn on how to upgrade to larger hard drive"
>>http://www.newreleasesvideo.com/hinsdale-how-to/index9....
>
>But he wasn't asking about installing a larger hard drive, he was asking
>about using the USB ports.
I know, i just sent him to the most likely places to get different info on
hacking the tivo, from upgrading harddrives to hacking the OS to viewing
assorted pictures of the inside etc...


That is why i posted all 3 url's
Anonymous
July 10, 2005 12:42:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

<mattack@gmail.com> wrote in message news:D ana8r$rt9$1@vax.hanford.org...
> In article <dafph6$imt$2@news.xmission.com>,
> GMAN <glenzabr@xmission.com> wrote:
>>Anyone who advises one to copy from the Tivo to a computer using a
>>composite
>>connection should be tarred and feathered. Why use composite when s-video
>>(Y/C) is available?
>
> Because in some cases the composite can apparently result in better
> picture?
>
> I say this with no firsthand knowledge, but at least regarding standalone
> DVD recorders, many people who are far far pickier about video than I am
> have said that at least in some cases, using composite results in a better
> picture. This is people on the avsforum.com DVD recorder section.
> --
> mattack@gmail.com

Not possible, the only possible issue would be color space
related, and there is no way composite can match S-video.

Luck;
Ken
Anonymous
July 14, 2005 4:55:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Ken Maltby wrote:
> <mattack@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:D ana8r$rt9$1@vax.hanford.org...
>> In article <dafph6$imt$2@news.xmission.com>,
>> GMAN <glenzabr@xmission.com> wrote:
>>> Anyone who advises one to copy from the Tivo to a computer using a
>>> composite
>>> connection should be tarred and feathered. Why use composite when
>>> s-video (Y/C) is available?
>>
>> Because in some cases the composite can apparently result in better
>> picture?
>>
>> I say this with no firsthand knowledge, but at least regarding
>> standalone DVD recorders, many people who are far far pickier about
>> video than I am have said that at least in some cases, using
>> composite results in a better picture. This is people on the
>> avsforum.com DVD recorder section. --
>> mattack@gmail.com
>
> Not possible, the only possible issue would be color space
> related, and there is no way composite can match S-video.
>
> Luck;
> Ken

Depends on where the better comb filter is. But you're right that
generally S-video is the preferable choice.

--
David G.
Anonymous
July 14, 2005 9:26:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

The only thing better than S-Video is Component. The rating from best to
worst for all video sources is cable, composite, s-video and component.
Component is a 3 cable video source dividing red, green and blue.

--
JOSEPH PERRY
Ham Radio is an outdoorsman's best friend.
"David G." <david_please_dont_email_me@i_hate_spam.com> wrote in message
news:RM6dnZCXM_Z-BUvfRVn-tw@comcast.com...
> Ken Maltby wrote:
>> <mattack@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:D ana8r$rt9$1@vax.hanford.org...
>>> In article <dafph6$imt$2@news.xmission.com>,
>>> GMAN <glenzabr@xmission.com> wrote:
>>>> Anyone who advises one to copy from the Tivo to a computer using a
>>>> composite
>>>> connection should be tarred and feathered. Why use composite when
>>>> s-video (Y/C) is available?
>>>
>>> Because in some cases the composite can apparently result in better
>>> picture?
>>>
>>> I say this with no firsthand knowledge, but at least regarding
>>> standalone DVD recorders, many people who are far far pickier about
>>> video than I am have said that at least in some cases, using
>>> composite results in a better picture. This is people on the
>>> avsforum.com DVD recorder section. --
>>> mattack@gmail.com
>>
>> Not possible, the only possible issue would be color space
>> related, and there is no way composite can match S-video.
>>
>> Luck;
>> Ken
>
> Depends on where the better comb filter is. But you're right that
> generally S-video is the preferable choice.
>
> --
> David G.
Anonymous
July 14, 2005 9:26:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

JOSEPH PERRY wrote:
> The only thing better than S-Video is Component. The rating from best to
> worst for all video sources is cable, composite, s-video and component.

That's true if you make the assumption that *all else is equal*.
Different sources may use different comb filters, upconverts, etc. But
in general the better quality connection types will use at least as good
processes and parts as the lower quality connection types, so that
assumption is a pretty good one.

> Component is a 3 cable video source dividing red, green and blue.

Sorry, that is incorrect, I could write it out, but I have a nice
pre-written passage handy ;-)

"Component video consists of three signals. The first is the luminance
signal, which indicates brightness or black & white information that is
contained in the original RGB signal. It is referred to as the "Y"
component. The second and third signals are called "color difference"
signals which indicate how much blue and red there is relative to
luminance. The blue component is "B-Y" and the red component is "R-Y".
The color difference signals are mathematical derivatives of the RGB signal.

Green doesn't need to be transmitted as a separate signal since it can
be inferred from the "Y, B-Y, R-Y" combination. The display device knows
how bright the image is from the Y component, and since it knows how
much is blue and red, it figures the rest must be green so it fills it in."

Randy S.
Anonymous
July 14, 2005 9:26:11 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 17:26:10 GMT, JOSEPH PERRY wrote:

> The only thing better than S-Video is Component. The rating from best to
> worst for all video sources is cable, composite, s-video and component.
> Component is a 3 cable video source dividing red, green and blue.

The cables are marked Red, Green, and Blue, so perhaps that led you to
think that was what they carried. It is a common misunderstanding. As was
detailed already, that is incorrect.

Brad H
July 14, 2005 11:01:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

In article <db68mr$thg$1@spnode25.nerdc.ufl.edu>, "Randy S." <rswitt@nospam.com> wrote:
>JOSEPH PERRY wrote:
>> The only thing better than S-Video is Component. The rating from best to
>> worst for all video sources is cable, composite, s-video and component.
>
>That's true if you make the assumption that *all else is equal*.
>Different sources may use different comb filters, upconverts, etc. But
>in general the better quality connection types will use at least as good
>processes and parts as the lower quality connection types, so that
>assumption is a pretty good one.
>
>> Component is a 3 cable video source dividing red, green and blue.
>
>Sorry, that is incorrect, I could write it out, but I have a nice
>pre-written passage handy ;-)
>
>"Component video consists of three signals. The first is the luminance
>signal, which indicates brightness or black & white information that is
>contained in the original RGB signal. It is referred to as the "Y"
>component. The second and third signals are called "color difference"
>signals which indicate how much blue and red there is relative to
>luminance. The blue component is "B-Y" and the red component is "R-Y".
>The color difference signals are mathematical derivatives of the RGB signal.
>
>Green doesn't need to be transmitted as a separate signal since it can
>be inferred from the "Y, B-Y, R-Y" combination. The display device knows
>how bright the image is from the Y component, and since it knows how
>much is blue and red, it figures the rest must be green so it fills it in."
>
>Randy S.
Great explanation, THANKS!!!
Anonymous
July 14, 2005 11:01:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

>>"Component video consists of three signals. The first is the luminance
>>signal, which indicates brightness or black & white information that is
>>contained in the original RGB signal. It is referred to as the "Y"
>>component. The second and third signals are called "color difference"
>>signals which indicate how much blue and red there is relative to
>>luminance. The blue component is "B-Y" and the red component is "R-Y".
>>The color difference signals are mathematical derivatives of the RGB signal.
>>
>>Green doesn't need to be transmitted as a separate signal since it can
>>be inferred from the "Y, B-Y, R-Y" combination. The display device knows
>>how bright the image is from the Y component, and since it knows how
>>much is blue and red, it figures the rest must be green so it fills it in."
>>
>>Randy S.
>
> Great explanation, THANKS!!!

That comes from an article here:

http://www.projectorcentral.com/component.htm

which also includes a nice explanation of composite and s-video
connections, as well as progressive vs. interlaced. I like its easy to
understand explanations.

Randy S.
Anonymous
July 15, 2005 4:32:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

That is why. I appreciate your explanation.

--
JOSEPH PERRY
Ham Radio is an outdoorsman's best friend.
"Brad Houser" <bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote in message
news:1hxonlcqpgmdz.1p2j4lh5cs5na$.dlg@40tude.net...
> On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 17:26:10 GMT, JOSEPH PERRY wrote:
>
>> The only thing better than S-Video is Component. The rating from best to
>> worst for all video sources is cable, composite, s-video and component.
>> Component is a 3 cable video source dividing red, green and blue.
>
> The cables are marked Red, Green, and Blue, so perhaps that led you to
> think that was what they carried. It is a common misunderstanding. As was
> detailed already, that is incorrect.
>
> Brad H
!