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Thin clients for security/torrents/Magicjack

Last response: in Networking
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May 2, 2012 4:07:36 PM

Not sure if this is in the right category.
I was contemplating using a thin client but instead of a version of XP like most use I was thinking it would be better to use a less virus prone operating system: Like OS X. Many people use OSX (or OS X86) on PC's after getting the right software and hardware but I wonder if anyone has used OS X on a thin client? When we download stuff viruses are always a worry. OS X eliminates almost all of that. One could also use the thin client for security camera motion or audio detector monitoring. Coupled with a large hard drive it might be very useful, meanwhile only consuming minuscule amounts of electricity. It would be networked to the main PC or maybe notl. But can I network it without being vulnerable to viruses? Many people use Magicjack with a thin client because the newer ones that run independently off your router are about 3-4 times as expensive as the old ones.

It just make sense to have an always on computer running stuff. As long as it doesn't affect your power bill much that is.
May 2, 2012 5:51:54 PM

A thin client cannot run OS X, at least not legally first off. Second, a thin client cannot run ANY OS stand alone, a thin client has no hard drive, and not much in the way of brains. It can function as a low power firewall or Linux client on it's own, but that's about it.
May 2, 2012 7:22:41 PM

Couldn't care less about Apple's silly rules. Most OSX86 users buy a legit copy of the OS and later get a real Mac, though I can't imagine why anyone would do such a silly thing as that when you end up paying about 4 times what the components would cost if you have the ability to Google computer parts. So Apple benefits even from OSX86 users. More importantly though, if they like the OS (temporary lapse in sanity!) they tell friends and most people are scared away by the techy aspects of OSX86 and buy a real Mac. Apple benefits again.

I've seen several thin clients that run a minimalist version of XP. Not sure if they do the same with Win7.

Another reason to never buy a Mac is repair costs. Ever priced out a motherboard or monitor from an iMac? Its often more or close to the total cost of the machine. That's how Apple treats you after it gleefully stuffs your hard earned money into its greedy pockets. That's often why Mac users upgrade. But it costs too much to get the part to get it repaired. Meanwhile the PC user dishes out $30-50 at the most for a used motherboard (the most expensive part in the computer) and is back up and running immediately. Any other parts are less.
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May 2, 2012 7:25:52 PM

I'm surprised someone didn't sell all the compatible parts with instructions online for installing the OS. They wouldn't be in conflict with any legal issues with Apple because hey, they're just selling parts. And Apple could still sell them the OS.
Or, even better, sell just the motherboard and video card (if the mb doesn't have built on video). Weighs almost nothing, small to ship, not even very fragile. They can pick up the other parts at their local store or Newegg. Its not as if a case has to be OSX86 compatible!
May 3, 2012 1:26:20 AM

tom2u said:
Couldn't care less about Apple's silly rules. Most OSX86 users buy a legit copy of the OS and later get a real Mac, though I can't imagine why anyone would do such a silly thing as that when you end up paying about 4 times what the components would cost if you have the ability to Google computer parts. So Apple benefits even from OSX86 users. More importantly though, if they like the OS (temporary lapse in sanity!) they tell friends and most people are scared away by the techy aspects of OSX86 and buy a real Mac. Apple benefits again.

I've seen several thin clients that run a minimalist version of XP. Not sure if they do the same with Win7.

Another reason to never buy a Mac is repair costs. Ever priced out a motherboard or monitor from an iMac? Its often more or close to the total cost of the machine. That's how Apple treats you after it gleefully stuffs your hard earned money into its greedy pockets. That's often why Mac users upgrade. But it costs too much to get the part to get it repaired. Meanwhile the PC user dishes out $30-50 at the most for a used motherboard (the most expensive part in the computer) and is back up and running immediately. Any other parts are less.


It runs something called XP Embedded which most end users cannot obatin, and some thin clients come with that built in on the flash. A normal install would not fit on a thin client because a thin client is supposed to recieve it's image from a server as part of a VDI solution. If your looking to build a hackintosh, it would be better to get a netbook and proceed.
May 3, 2012 9:40:36 PM

So how does one reinstall the OS if it gets corrupted somehow? (Almost all Windows installations seem to sooner or later.)
May 3, 2012 11:01:35 PM

It just gets a new image pushed to it. The local users don't modify the master copy.
May 11, 2012 2:32:18 AM

Pushed? Pushed from where? If you buy a thin client privately, as in used, how do you reinstall the OS?
!