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May Have Fried My Infinity Modulus Subwoofer

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January 29, 2005 10:16:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Looks like I did some damage to the electronics of my Infinity Modulus
Subwoofer. (The original model, CIRCA 1992).

I went up to change a CD and as soon as I touched the tray, I felt
some static discharge and heard a loud pop through the speakers. The
green light on the crossover control unit (CCU) went out and the
standby light on both the CCU and the speaker cabinet went on.
Everything seems to be stuck in that mode, I can't get it out of
standby.

I inspected the CCU and cabinet thoroughly and don't see any fuses.

Would someone who is knowledgeable of this product please guide me in
the right direction? Should I open the CCU and look for fuses? Should
I open the cabinet?

Much appreciated,

A_C
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 11:35:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I myself have never worked on your models of equipment. But, from
experience, when there is a static discharge, there are usually damaged
electronic components along with it. I would think that one or more of the
units in the chain will have to be serviced at the component level.

This is something I doubt you will be able to do yourself. The proper
training, experience, service manuals, and test gear will be required to do
proper service on this these types of systems.

--

Jerry G.
=====

"Agent_C" <Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:ijvmv0lo2u81flit28tpltulqanvhaatdu@4ax.com...
Looks like I did some damage to the electronics of my Infinity Modulus
Subwoofer. (The original model, CIRCA 1992).

I went up to change a CD and as soon as I touched the tray, I felt
some static discharge and heard a loud pop through the speakers. The
green light on the crossover control unit (CCU) went out and the
standby light on both the CCU and the speaker cabinet went on.
Everything seems to be stuck in that mode, I can't get it out of
standby.

I inspected the CCU and cabinet thoroughly and don't see any fuses.

Would someone who is knowledgeable of this product please guide me in
the right direction? Should I open the CCU and look for fuses? Should
I open the cabinet?

Much appreciated,

A_C
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 4:15:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <ijvmv0lo2u81flit28tpltulqanvhaatdu@4ax.com>,
Agent_C <Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote:

> Looks like I did some damage to the electronics of my Infinity Modulus
> Subwoofer. (The original model, CIRCA 1992).
>
> I went up to change a CD and as soon as I touched the tray, I felt
> some static discharge and heard a loud pop through the speakers. The
> green light on the crossover control unit (CCU) went out and the
> standby light on both the CCU and the speaker cabinet went on.
> Everything seems to be stuck in that mode, I can't get it out of
> standby.
>
> I inspected the CCU and cabinet thoroughly and don't see any fuses.
>
> Would someone who is knowledgeable of this product please guide me in
> the right direction? Should I open the CCU and look for fuses? Should
> I open the cabinet?
>
> Much appreciated,
>
> A_C

Have you tried unplugging it for a few minutes? I doubt it's damaged.
Likely it triggered a speaker protection circuit when the "pop" happened.

There are specific ways for ESD to cause damage and it's not likely to
happen to a complete circuit. It's mostly a risk to unattached
semiconductors, like when making circuit board repairs.
Related resources
Anonymous
January 30, 2005 9:16:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Doubt if it's damaged? After a static shock? Man. That's not my experience.
Ive seen lots of bad micros after static shocks, and even if it's a common
subwoofer design, there could still be op-amps punched through from the
momentary over-voltage.

Mark Z.


"Kevin McMurtrie" <mcmurtri@dslextreme.com> wrote in message
news:mcmurtri-AB589F.13154629012005@corp-radius.supernews.com...
> In article <ijvmv0lo2u81flit28tpltulqanvhaatdu@4ax.com>,
> Agent_C <Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
>
>> Looks like I did some damage to the electronics of my Infinity Modulus
>> Subwoofer. (The original model, CIRCA 1992).
>>
>> I went up to change a CD and as soon as I touched the tray, I felt
>> some static discharge and heard a loud pop through the speakers. The
>> green light on the crossover control unit (CCU) went out and the
>> standby light on both the CCU and the speaker cabinet went on.
>> Everything seems to be stuck in that mode, I can't get it out of
>> standby.
>>
>> I inspected the CCU and cabinet thoroughly and don't see any fuses.
>>
>> Would someone who is knowledgeable of this product please guide me in
>> the right direction? Should I open the CCU and look for fuses? Should
>> I open the cabinet?
>>
>> Much appreciated,
>>
>> A_C
>
> Have you tried unplugging it for a few minutes? I doubt it's damaged.
> Likely it triggered a speaker protection circuit when the "pop" happened.
>
> There are specific ways for ESD to cause damage and it's not likely to
> happen to a complete circuit. It's mostly a risk to unattached
> semiconductors, like when making circuit board repairs.
Anonymous
January 30, 2005 7:01:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <3641hjF4s1jglU1@individual.net>,
"Mark D. Zacharias" <mzacharias@yis.us> wrote:

> Doubt if it's damaged? After a static shock? Man. That's not my experience.
> Ive seen lots of bad micros after static shocks, and even if it's a common
> subwoofer design, there could still be op-amps punched through from the
> momentary over-voltage.
>
> Mark Z.

Any circuit worthy of a real brand name (not defective Asian knock-offs
rebranded as RCA) will have ESD protection. That is at least grounded
hardware, grounded metal trim, and overvoltage protection on inputs.
Big portions of the world have have air so dry that a sparking finger is
normal.

ESD protection is easy. At most it's two resistors and two diodes. If
the input circuit has a forward diode path for both polarities already,
a resistor alone is enough. ESD damage comes from creating a high
voltage across an insulated semiconductor junction or a reverse high
voltage across a diode junction. For example, a positive discharge on
the base of an NPN transistor is harmless but a negative discharge will
likely damage it.

>
> "Kevin McMurtrie" <mcmurtri@dslextreme.com> wrote in message
> news:mcmurtri-AB589F.13154629012005@corp-radius.supernews.com...
> > In article <ijvmv0lo2u81flit28tpltulqanvhaatdu@4ax.com>,
> > Agent_C <Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Looks like I did some damage to the electronics of my Infinity Modulus
> >> Subwoofer. (The original model, CIRCA 1992).
> >>
> >> I went up to change a CD and as soon as I touched the tray, I felt
> >> some static discharge and heard a loud pop through the speakers. The
> >> green light on the crossover control unit (CCU) went out and the
> >> standby light on both the CCU and the speaker cabinet went on.
> >> Everything seems to be stuck in that mode, I can't get it out of
> >> standby.
> >>
> >> I inspected the CCU and cabinet thoroughly and don't see any fuses.
> >>
> >> Would someone who is knowledgeable of this product please guide me in
> >> the right direction? Should I open the CCU and look for fuses? Should
> >> I open the cabinet?
> >>
> >> Much appreciated,
> >>
> >> A_C
> >
> > Have you tried unplugging it for a few minutes? I doubt it's damaged.
> > Likely it triggered a speaker protection circuit when the "pop" happened.
> >
> > There are specific ways for ESD to cause damage and it's not likely to
> > happen to a complete circuit. It's mostly a risk to unattached
> > semiconductors, like when making circuit board repairs.
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 7:50:02 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Most cheap subwoofers only have series regulators for the + and - 15 volt
lines for the op-amps. A surge of any sort can mean death for one or more
op-amps. I get lots of these repairs, though I believe the vast majority are
caused by lightning or power line surges, not a static shock from the
customer, since there's normally no reason to touch it, and no exposed metal
on the front or top.

In the wintertime we get lots of static where I live. One of our techs got a
static shock to a JVC vcr (back when they were worth fixing) and took out
the timer micro.

Some recent Kenwood surround receivers get a bad micro from static shocks to
the front panel. Bad design. Appears the -30 volt line punches through to
the +5 volt line.

ESD protection is by no means universal, even on nicer equipment, and
certainly not perfect.


Mark Z.


"Kevin McMurtrie" <mcmurtri@dslextreme.com> wrote in message
news:mcmurtri-E2C1F0.16012030012005@corp-radius.supernews.com...
> In article <3641hjF4s1jglU1@individual.net>,
> "Mark D. Zacharias" <mzacharias@yis.us> wrote:
>
>> Doubt if it's damaged? After a static shock? Man. That's not my
>> experience.
>> Ive seen lots of bad micros after static shocks, and even if it's a
>> common
>> subwoofer design, there could still be op-amps punched through from the
>> momentary over-voltage.
>>
>> Mark Z.
>
> Any circuit worthy of a real brand name (not defective Asian knock-offs
> rebranded as RCA) will have ESD protection. That is at least grounded
> hardware, grounded metal trim, and overvoltage protection on inputs.
> Big portions of the world have have air so dry that a sparking finger is
> normal.
>
> ESD protection is easy. At most it's two resistors and two diodes. If
> the input circuit has a forward diode path for both polarities already,
> a resistor alone is enough. ESD damage comes from creating a high
> voltage across an insulated semiconductor junction or a reverse high
> voltage across a diode junction. For example, a positive discharge on
> the base of an NPN transistor is harmless but a negative discharge will
> likely damage it.
>
>>
>> "Kevin McMurtrie" <mcmurtri@dslextreme.com> wrote in message
>> news:mcmurtri-AB589F.13154629012005@corp-radius.supernews.com...
>> > In article <ijvmv0lo2u81flit28tpltulqanvhaatdu@4ax.com>,
>> > Agent_C <Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote:
>> >
>> >> Looks like I did some damage to the electronics of my Infinity Modulus
>> >> Subwoofer. (The original model, CIRCA 1992).
>> >>
>> >> I went up to change a CD and as soon as I touched the tray, I felt
>> >> some static discharge and heard a loud pop through the speakers. The
>> >> green light on the crossover control unit (CCU) went out and the
>> >> standby light on both the CCU and the speaker cabinet went on.
>> >> Everything seems to be stuck in that mode, I can't get it out of
>> >> standby.
>> >>
>> >> I inspected the CCU and cabinet thoroughly and don't see any fuses.
>> >>
>> >> Would someone who is knowledgeable of this product please guide me in
>> >> the right direction? Should I open the CCU and look for fuses? Should
>> >> I open the cabinet?
>> >>
>> >> Much appreciated,
>> >>
>> >> A_C
>> >
>> > Have you tried unplugging it for a few minutes? I doubt it's damaged.
>> > Likely it triggered a speaker protection circuit when the "pop"
>> > happened.
>> >
>> > There are specific ways for ESD to cause damage and it's not likely to
>> > happen to a complete circuit. It's mostly a risk to unattached
>> > semiconductors, like when making circuit board repairs.
February 5, 2005 10:05:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Would the kind individual who responded to my original post and
indicated he had an extra ECU please get in tough with me?

After responding to your email I inadvertently deleted it. It turns
out, that I may be able to use that ECU after all if you could part
with it.

Regards,

A_C



On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 07:16:56 -0500, Agent_C
<Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote:

>Looks like I did some damage to the electronics of my Infinity Modulus
>Subwoofer. (The original model, CIRCA 1992).
>
>I went up to change a CD and as soon as I touched the tray, I felt
>some static discharge and heard a loud pop through the speakers. The
>green light on the crossover control unit (CCU) went out and the
>standby light on both the CCU and the speaker cabinet went on.
>Everything seems to be stuck in that mode, I can't get it out of
>standby.
>
>I inspected the CCU and cabinet thoroughly and don't see any fuses.
>
>Would someone who is knowledgeable of this product please guide me in
>the right direction? Should I open the CCU and look for fuses? Should
>I open the cabinet?
>
>Much appreciated,
>
>A_C
February 5, 2005 10:06:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Would the kind individual who responded to my original post and
indicated he had an extra ECU please get in tough with me?

After responding to your email I inadvertently deleted it. It turns
out, that I may be able to use that ECU after all if you could part
with it.

Regards,

A_C



On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 07:16:56 -0500, Agent_C
<Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote:

>Looks like I did some damage to the electronics of my Infinity Modulus
>Subwoofer. (The original model, CIRCA 1992).
>
>I went up to change a CD and as soon as I touched the tray, I felt
>some static discharge and heard a loud pop through the speakers. The
>green light on the crossover control unit (CCU) went out and the
>standby light on both the CCU and the speaker cabinet went on.
>Everything seems to be stuck in that mode, I can't get it out of
>standby.
>
>I inspected the CCU and cabinet thoroughly and don't see any fuses.
>
>Would someone who is knowledgeable of this product please guide me in
>the right direction? Should I open the CCU and look for fuses? Should
>I open the cabinet?
>
>Much appreciated,
>
>A_C
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 9:24:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Sanyo subwoofer containing 5 amp channels for surround system using a combo
dvd/vcr unit and special connector cable.

Neutral lift due to incompetent line repair by electric company after an ice
storm. Equipment wasn't damaged by the outage, but by the fact that the
neutral was NOT re-connected first.

Damage:

Fuses

All 4 output IC's

Power transformer

Woofer frozen.


Unit now resides in dumpster.


Mark Z.



"Agent_C" <Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:ijvmv0lo2u81flit28tpltulqanvhaatdu@4ax.com...
> Looks like I did some damage to the electronics of my Infinity Modulus
> Subwoofer. (The original model, CIRCA 1992).
>
> I went up to change a CD and as soon as I touched the tray, I felt
> some static discharge and heard a loud pop through the speakers. The
> green light on the crossover control unit (CCU) went out and the
> standby light on both the CCU and the speaker cabinet went on.
> Everything seems to be stuck in that mode, I can't get it out of
> standby.
>
> I inspected the CCU and cabinet thoroughly and don't see any fuses.
>
> Would someone who is knowledgeable of this product please guide me in
> the right direction? Should I open the CCU and look for fuses? Should
> I open the cabinet?
>
> Much appreciated,
>
> A_C
>
February 15, 2005 11:36:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Ouch! Are you going to make a claim against the power company?

A_C
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 11:07:18 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

It was a customer of mine. The power company is stonewalling. He had lots of
stuff fried, unclear at this point if he will file the insurance claim and
let them go after the electric company, or hire a lawyer himself.

Mark Z.


"Agent_C" <Agent-C-hates-spam@nyc.rr.com> wrote in message
news:1108485413.289189.259260@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Ouch! Are you going to make a claim against the power company?
>
> A_C
>
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 11:32:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <37e7v2F5ccot4U1@individual.net>,
"Mark D. Zacharias" <mzacharias@yis.us> wrote:

> Sanyo subwoofer containing 5 amp channels for surround system using a combo
> dvd/vcr unit and special connector cable.
>
> Neutral lift due to incompetent line repair by electric company after an ice
> storm. Equipment wasn't damaged by the outage, but by the fact that the
> neutral was NOT re-connected first.
>
> Damage:
>
> Fuses
>
> All 4 output IC's
>
> Power transformer
>
> Woofer frozen.
>
>
> Unit now resides in dumpster.
>
>
> Mark Z.
>
>

Ouch. That's the worst possible kind of damage. The transformer
saturating probably held the floating AC lines at about 170V or so.
There's not enough current to blow fuses and not enough voltage to
trigger a surge protector, but it will start frying parts after a few
seconds.

The electric companies have a tester that plugs into your meter jack.
It measures voltage, load sag, and of course the neutral line strength.
Anonymous
February 16, 2005 12:39:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Kevin McMurtrie" <mcmurtri@dslextreme.com> wrote in message
news:mcmurtri-DC54BA.20324215022005@corp-radius.supernews.com...
> In article <37e7v2F5ccot4U1@individual.net>,
> "Mark D. Zacharias" <mzacharias@yis.us> wrote:
>
>> Sanyo subwoofer containing 5 amp channels for surround system using a
>> combo
>> dvd/vcr unit and special connector cable.
>>
>> Neutral lift due to incompetent line repair by electric company after an
>> ice
>> storm. Equipment wasn't damaged by the outage, but by the fact that the
>> neutral was NOT re-connected first.
>>
>> Damage:
>>
>> Fuses
>>
>> All 4 output IC's
>>
>> Power transformer
>>
>> Woofer frozen.
>>
>>
>> Unit now resides in dumpster.
>>
>>
>> Mark Z.
>>
>>
>
> Ouch. That's the worst possible kind of damage. The transformer
> saturating probably held the floating AC lines at about 170V or so.
> There's not enough current to blow fuses and not enough voltage to
> trigger a surge protector, but it will start frying parts after a few
> seconds.
>
> The electric companies have a tester that plugs into your meter jack.
> It measures voltage, load sag, and of course the neutral line strength.

Been through this, took out an apartment complex in college, no money back.
5 yrs later same complex did it again. Still have a Carver CT24 in my shop
from my brother, seems the switching IC's are unobtanium in quantities of
less than 100 (NJU7311/7313AL). Grrrrrrr.

You should see what it does to a crock pot!

Chad
!