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Accessing a Hacked Tivo from the Internet -- Networking qu..

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Anonymous
September 19, 2005 3:25:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

I have a tivo that Ive added a network card and larger hard drive to.
Everything works great, and Im able to transfer files from the tivo to
my local network.

I want to see if I can transfer a file from the tivo directly to a pc
located not on the local network but on the internet. How would I set
this up?

I imagine I would have to configure the router so that it allows access
to the Tivo device ( port forwarding? DMZ? ). But what IP address
would I use to find my tivo from the outside (the router's ip address?
my tivo's local ip address assigned by the router? the ip address
assigned from sbc to my router?)

Argh.. very confusing!
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 5:29:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

<benn686@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1127154341.895589.114830@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> I have a tivo that Ive added a network card and larger hard drive to.
> Everything works great, and Im able to transfer files from the tivo to
> my local network.
>
> I want to see if I can transfer a file from the tivo directly to a pc
> located not on the local network but on the internet. How would I set
> this up?
>
> I imagine I would have to configure the router so that it allows access
> to the Tivo device ( port forwarding? DMZ? ). But what IP address
> would I use to find my tivo from the outside (the router's ip address?
> my tivo's local ip address assigned by the router? the ip address
> assigned from sbc to my router?)
>
> Argh.. very confusing!

You'd port forward your router to the TIVO. I don't know what ports the
TIVO uses to communicate with the various packages. I've got a Series 1
TIVO and, as I recall, programs like TSERVER and TIVOWeb allow you to
specify ports.

Once the router is port forwarding correctly, you just need to direct
whatever software you're using to the _outside_ IP address provided by your
ISP. Your router will take care of forwarding the appropriate port requests
to the TIVO automatically.

HOWEVER . . .

TIVOs are slow on networked transfers. When I'm away from home and want a
TIVO show, I'll transfer it to one of my local networked computers first
(using VNC to control the local machine), and then transfer it from the
networked computer to the remote computer (using VPN).

>
Anonymous
September 19, 2005 9:28:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Thanks.. how can I find what IP address my isp has assigned me? If I
just do a 'ipconfig /all' from a computer thats connected to the
router/internet its only going to show the ip that the router assigned
to it. How can I determine the outside IP address I would use to
connect to the router?
Related resources
September 19, 2005 10:38:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

* Wrote in alt.video.ptv.tivo:

> I have a tivo that Ive added a network card and larger hard drive
> to. Everything works great, and Im able to transfer files from the
> tivo to my local network.
>
> I want to see if I can transfer a file from the tivo directly to a
> pc located not on the local network but on the internet. How
> would I set this up?
>
> I imagine I would have to configure the router so that it allows
> access to the Tivo device ( port forwarding?

Yes.

> DMZ? ).

Not unless you are very brave and dont mind someone trying to get to
your Tivo from the outside...

> But what IP
> address would I use to find my tivo from the outside (the router's
> ip address?

Yes and port fowarding on the Router will direct specific
traffic/requests to the Tivo. Id suggest using ssh on the Tivo.

> my tivo's local ip address assigned by the router?

It dosent have to be, you can assign the IP to the tivo if you
desire.


--
David
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 12:30:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

>I want to see if I can transfer a file from the tivo directly to a pc
>located not on the local network but on the internet. How would I set
>this up?

Very carefully. There's lots of viruses and hackers out there.

>I imagine I would have to configure the router so that it allows access
>to the Tivo device ( port forwarding? DMZ? ). But what IP address
>would I use to find my tivo from the outside (the router's ip address?
>my tivo's local ip address assigned by the router? the ip address
>assigned from sbc to my router?)

If your TiVo has a public IP, use it, and allow the access at the
router.

If your TiVo is behind a NAT gateway (probably is), use the router's
IP public IP and set up the router to forward incoming connections
on the particular port to the TiVo.

Gordon L. Burditt
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 1:09:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

<benn686@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1127176128.652167.6070@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Thanks.. how can I find what IP address my isp has assigned me? If I
> just do a 'ipconfig /all' from a computer thats connected to the
> router/internet its only going to show the ip that the router assigned
> to it. How can I determine the outside IP address I would use to
> connect to the router?
>

If you want to be able to this on a regular basis, your best bet would be to
get a Dynamic DNS subscription from somebody like dns2go, this will allow
you to give your outside interface a real name like mytivo.dns2go.com which
will make it much easier for you.

Otherwise, you potentially have to go to your router each time and use it's
admin interface to determine your outside IP address.


--
Nik Simpson
September 20, 2005 4:44:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

<benn686@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1127176128.652167.6070@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Thanks.. how can I find what IP address my isp has assigned me? If I
> just do a 'ipconfig /all' from a computer thats connected to the
> router/internet its only going to show the ip that the router assigned
> to it. How can I determine the outside IP address I would use to
> connect to the router?

http://www.whatismyip.com

Or from the status page your router (probably) has.
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 4:44:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Seth wrote:
> <benn686@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1127176128.652167.6070@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
>> Thanks.. how can I find what IP address my isp has assigned me? If I
>> just do a 'ipconfig /all' from a computer thats connected to the
>> router/internet its only going to show the ip that the router assigned
>> to it. How can I determine the outside IP address I would use to
>> connect to the router?
>
>
> http://www.whatismyip.com
>
> Or from the status page your router (probably) has.
>

Of course, be aware that unless you signed up for a static IP address
(highly unlikely), your address will change from time to time. The way
around that is to look into a dynamic DNS service (just google for them,
there's plenty, and some are free).

Randy S.
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 5:15:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

>Thanks.. how can I find what IP address my isp has assigned me? If I
>just do a 'ipconfig /all' from a computer thats connected to the
>router/internet its only going to show the ip that the router assigned
>to it. How can I determine the outside IP address I would use to
>connect to the router?

Ask the router. Doesn't it have a web page or you telnet to it to
configure it? Most routers will tell you what IP address you got
and how long it is before renewal.

The *inside* ip address of your router is likely to be the IP address
of any machine on your network with the last octet replaced by .1
..

You can also, from any machine in your network, go to a public web
site that will tell you what your public IP address is, such as
http://www.myipresolve.com .

Gordon L. Burditt
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 10:46:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

"Seth" <seth_lermanNOSPAM@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:MXIXe.7416$cg.5968@news02.roc.ny...
> <benn686@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1127176128.652167.6070@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>> Thanks.. how can I find what IP address my isp has assigned me? If I
>> just do a 'ipconfig /all' from a computer thats connected to the
>> router/internet its only going to show the ip that the router assigned
>> to it. How can I determine the outside IP address I would use to
>> connect to the router?
>
> http://www.whatismyip.com
>
> Or from the status page your router (probably) has.
>

The trouble with that is it only helps you when you are inside your own
network, in which case getting access to the outside of your network is not
particularly useful. If you need to know your outside IP address when you
are anywhere else in the world you'll need some sort of dynamic DNS service
for your network.


--
Nik Simpson
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 6:08:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

benn686@hotmail.com wrote:
> I have a tivo that Ive added a network card and larger hard drive to.
> Everything works great, and Im able to transfer files from the tivo to
> my local network.
>
> I want to see if I can transfer a file from the tivo directly to a pc
> located not on the local network but on the internet. How would I set
> this up?

With great difficulty. If your TiVo were directly accessible from
the Internet, it would quickly succumb to incoming attacks.

> I imagine I would have to configure the router so that it allows access
> to the Tivo device ( port forwarding? DMZ? ). But what IP address
> would I use to find my tivo from the outside (the router's ip address?
> my tivo's local ip address assigned by the router? the ip address
> assigned from sbc to my router?)

As I understand it, the IP address is irrelevant. Your TiVo and your
PC can locate each other by sending out UDP broadcasts on the LAN.
Routers don't pass UDP broadcasts (but bridges do). Unless you have
hardware at both ends that support VPN and have the experience of
setting up Virtual Private Networks, I would not recommend doing that.

What I have been doing is something like this:
*) Firewall/Router configured to do port forwarding, so that
incoming SSH connections go to one particular PC.
*) Use VNC over SSH to get control of the PC's keyboard/display/mouse.
*) Use regular software to copy video from the TiVo to the PC,
then use SCP to copy from the home PC to the work PC.

-Joe
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 11:00:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

> As I understand it, the IP address is irrelevant. Your TiVo and your
> PC can locate each other by sending out UDP broadcasts on the LAN.
> Routers don't pass UDP broadcasts (but bridges do).

I'm not sure why you're limiting that to UDP. Routers are broadcast
boundaries. By default they block all LAN broadcasts because they
typically are the connection between separate LANs. It's usually
possible to tie together separate physical LANs into a single Logical
LAN if you want to, largely by allowing broadcasts to pass through the
router from one to the other (I've done this to support separate small
buildings w/ one central DHCP server and one IP range).

You should be able to set your router to port forward UDP packets as
well as TCP packets, so there really is no difference. It's just that
TCP ports are more commonly blocked than UDP ports.

The main difference is that TCP requires ack (acknowledge) packets from
time to time to ensure reliable communication, UDP does not.
Traditionally UDP was therefore used for communication that was more
time sensitive and less content sensitive (i.e. if something was missing
it was no big deal). For example TCP is good for file transfers (if it
pauses for .5 seconds in the middle there's no big deal, but if part of
it is missing, most likely it's no good at all), and UDP is good for
VOIP (pauses and waits are distracting or confusing, but if a .1 second
part is lost it's no big deal). More recently things are more
complicated because some applications have used UDP to avoid being
blocked, and implement reliability mechanisms in the application itself.

Randy S.
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 2:01:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

> What I have been doing is something like this:
> *) Firewall/Router configured to do port forwarding, so that
> incoming SSH connections go to one particular PC.
> *) Use VNC over SSH to get control of the PC's
> keyboard/display/mouse.
> *) Use regular software to copy video from the TiVo to the PC,
> then use SCP to copy from the home PC to the work PC.

Are there routers available that will essentially bridge two home LANs over
the Internet?

I'm thinking of something that supports a VPN that has endpoints on the two
home LANs. At that point you'd have a bridge, right?

Would that work?
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 3:19:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Randy S. wrote:
>
>> As I understand it, the IP address is irrelevant. Your TiVo and your
>> PC can locate each other by sending out UDP broadcasts on the LAN.
>> Routers don't pass UDP broadcasts (but bridges do).
>
> I'm not sure why you're limiting that to UDP.

Mainly because TCP broadcasts do not exist. [The three-way handshake
cannot work in a broadcast environment.]

-Joe
!