Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

TIVO DirecTV Canada

Last response: in Home Theatre Legacy
Share
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 1:53:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,alt.dss.tech (More info?)

I see that TIVO now supports Canadian users and has local, Canadian
access numbers (for updating the schedule). DirecTV, of course, does
not. If I'm in Canada and want to purchase a DirecTV DVR (I have
DirecTV thru my U.S. address), is it OK to plug the DVR into my
Canadian phone line? In other words, is the DVR just getting its
updates from TIVO, which doesn't care that I'm in Canada? What I'm
really looking for is a simple relacement for my VCR, and I do like the
feature of being able to rewind a show I'm watching, pause it, etc.

More about : tivo directv canada

Anonymous
September 20, 2005 10:54:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,alt.dss.tech (More info?)

<looknfourit@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:1127235229.192036.247640@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> I see that TIVO now supports Canadian users and has local, Canadian
> access numbers (for updating the schedule). DirecTV, of course, does
> not. If I'm in Canada and want to purchase a DirecTV DVR (I have
> DirecTV thru my U.S. address), is it OK to plug the DVR into my
> Canadian phone line? In other words, is the DVR just getting its
> updates from TIVO, which doesn't care that I'm in Canada? What I'm
> really looking for is a simple relacement for my VCR, and I do like the
> feature of being able to rewind a show I'm watching, pause it, etc.
>

The TiVo Series2 recorder calls a local phone number once per week
to report viewing history. That local phone number probably won't
be valid for DirecTV DVR accounts.

The DirecTV DVR receives software and guide updates from DirecTV,
not from TiVo. It's doubtful whether your DVR can access the
1-8xx number used to contact DirecTV from Canada. DirecTV DVRs
will attempt to contact DirecTV monthly to upload PPV data. These
call is scheduled each month and will take place even if NO PPV events
have been ordered in the past month.

You can purchase a Series2 TiVo and use it with a cable box
to view and record cable channels.
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 12:22:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Do can a Series 2 Direct TV TiVo be legally activated to use in Canada
or not?

If DirecTV says they can not sell service to Canada, and Tivo does not
support Directv units what does that mean? Can a hacked unit be made
legal without a US address?
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 5:55:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Look here...
http://www.tivo.com/1.6.1.asp#9

The Series2 TiVo is available to Canadians, but is not sold in Canada.
It appears the recent change in policy by TiVo implements TiVo
program guide service for Canadians.

DirecTV does not offer DVRs or program guide service to Canadians.

I'd guess a "hacked" unit is not legal under any circumstance.

"Ian Singer" <iansinger@sympatico.ca> wrote in message news:VI1Ye.7540$0u2.1216704@news20.bellglobal.com...
> Do can a Series 2 Direct TV TiVo be legally activated to use in Canada
> or not?
>
> If DirecTV says they can not sell service to Canada, and Tivo does not
> support Directv units what does that mean? Can a hacked unit be made
> legal without a US address?
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 5:55:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo (More info?)

Jack Ak wrote:
> Look here...
> http://www.tivo.com/1.6.1.asp#9
>
> The Series2 TiVo is available to Canadians, but is not sold in Canada.

I thought other messages were saying Best Buy was selling it?

> It appears the recent change in policy by TiVo implements TiVo
> program guide service for Canadians.
>
> DirecTV does not offer DVRs or program guide service to Canadians.

They may not offer it but I get it. Maybe because I put in a zip code?

>
> I'd guess a "hacked" unit is not legal under any circumstance.

The hacking was on older version of software to allowed saved programes
to be moved to PC, among other things. It should be legal with a legal
subscription and a P4 or D1 card. There is no reason why not.
September 21, 2005 7:18:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,alt.dss.tech (More info?)

I'm pretty certain there are many people doing what you're talking about.
Using a US billing address for DirecTV and using it in Canada. You just
need to figure out where the satellite is. As far as dialing in, let it
do the setup over a long distance number, then hook it up to a network
and let it doing any communications it needs over the net. No phone line
needed.

<looknfourit@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1127235229.192036.247640@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>I see that TIVO now supports Canadian users and has local, Canadian
> access numbers (for updating the schedule). DirecTV, of course, does
> not. If I'm in Canada and want to purchase a DirecTV DVR (I have
> DirecTV thru my U.S. address), is it OK to plug the DVR into my
> Canadian phone line? In other words, is the DVR just getting its
> updates from TIVO, which doesn't care that I'm in Canada? What I'm
> really looking for is a simple relacement for my VCR, and I do like the
> feature of being able to rewind a show I'm watching, pause it, etc.
>
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 11:03:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,alt.dss.tech (More info?)

Thanks for the info. If the DirecTV DVR dials DirecTV, then, no, it
wouldn't work from Canada. As to the idea of using a broadband
connection, I'm just using dialup. Question: what would happen if a
person had a Tivo, or Tivo-like product, and did not connect it to a
phone line at all? Would it still allow you to record, rewind, pause
live TV? Is the sole purpose of a phone connection to allow for the
downloading of a schedule? I'm interested in a simple replacement for
a VCR for use with a DirecTV system. I could buy another VCR, but a
DVR seems to make more sense, since I especially like the rewind
feature. Any recommendations for brand/model? Just something as easy
to use as a VCR for everyday recording.
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 6:55:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,alt.dss.tech (More info?)

>Thanks for the info. If the DirecTV DVR dials DirecTV, then, no, it
>wouldn't work from Canada. As to the idea of using a broadband
>connection, I'm just using dialup. Question: what would happen if a
>person had a Tivo, or Tivo-like product, and did not connect it to a
>phone line at all?

It depends entirely on WHICH product you have.

A Tivo Standalone Series 1 (at least most of them sold) will let
you record by time-and-channel, play back recordings, pause live
TV, etc. BUT you need a phone connection (but not necessarily a
subscription) to set the clock. I think that could be worked around
but it's likely to be a big pain.

It is rumored that a DirecTiVo has mass, occupies space, uses
electricity, and is useful as a paperweight only if you have a
subscription.

I have a Panasonic DVR that has its own TV schedule (no subscription
required) and it doesn't even have a way to connect it to a phone
line (schedule info comes in over the air somehow). It does
time-and-channel recording well.

>Would it still allow you to record, rewind, pause
>live TV?
>Is the sole purpose of a phone connection to allow for the
>downloading of a schedule?

On some systems it is also used to send back billing info for
Pay Per View. TiVo also uses it for software upgrades (which
are generally unwanted if you have hacked it).

>I'm interested in a simple replacement for
>a VCR for use with a DirecTV system. I could buy another VCR, but a
>DVR seems to make more sense, since I especially like the rewind
>feature. Any recommendations for brand/model? Just something as easy
>to use as a VCR for everyday recording.

It sounds like a simple non-Tivo DVR would meet your needs. Some
of them also do DVD recording.

Gordon L. Burditt
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 1:01:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,alt.dss.tech (More info?)

Gordon Burditt wrote:
> It sounds like a simple non-Tivo DVR would meet your needs. Some
> of them also do DVD recording.

Yes, but it's finding this "non-Tivo DVR" that is the problem. Most
seem to come with a TV Guide that I've read does not work with DirecTV.
Others only have a firewire connection, which can't connect to my
Toshiba TV. Any recommendations on a make/model?

On the other hand, if I went with a real Tivo (now supported in Canada)
and pay the subscription, I understand it still wouldn't change
channels on my DirecTV receiver. In other words, telling Tivo to record
the entire season of Lost really wouldn't do anything unless I made
sure my DirecTV was set to ABC...correct?
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 6:18:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,alt.dss.tech (More info?)

Gordon Burditt wrote:
> >Gordon Burditt wrote:
> >> It sounds like a simple non-Tivo DVR would meet your needs. Some
> >> of them also do DVD recording.
> >
> >Yes, but it's finding this "non-Tivo DVR" that is the problem. Most
> >seem to come with a TV Guide that I've read does not work with DirecTV.
>
> Since you said you wanted it as a VCR replacement, I assumed you
> don't CARE about the guide data.
>

Good point. It's true that what's most important to me is being able
to pause, rewind shows I'm watching live...and of course I'd like to be
able to set it up to copy shows that I'm unable to watch live. The TV
Guide would just make that process easier, though I'm willing to do it
the same as I did with my VCR.

> >On the other hand, if I went with a real Tivo (now supported in Canada)
> >and pay the subscription, I understand it still wouldn't change
> >channels on my DirecTV receiver. In other words, telling Tivo to record
> >the entire season of Lost really wouldn't do anything unless I made
> >sure my DirecTV was set to ABC...correct?
>
> TiVo can control other devices using the IR blaster, *if* it
> understands the codes for that device. Or you can use the serial
> cable, if your receiver will work with it. I thought a standalone
> TiVo could control a DirecTV receiver, along with a lot of other
> cable and satellite set-top boxes. A standalone TiVo with DirecTV
> isn't the optimum setup (with a DirecTiVo you get two tuners, and
> the TiVo subscription is less expensive).
>

Yes, I'd prefer the DirecTivo, but that's not an option because of my
location. I can't call DirecTV from here...even on my U.S. cellphone,
because it roams to a Canadian carrier...and if DirecTivo tries to call
DirecTV, it just won't go thru. (Someone else suggested a U.S. calling
card...good idea!) From what I've seen online, Tivos aren't extremely
expensive, so even paying the lifetime fee would make it cheaper than
some of the DVRs and give me the main features I want, especially
simplicity. Now, if a Tivo WILL control the DirecTV receiver, then
I've got a good substitute for the DirecTivo...though I'd be missing
out on being able to watch & record two different programs. Any way of
telling in advance if it will control the DirecTV receiver?

Finally, any recommendations on the model of Tivo....or the make/model
of a non-Tivo that will do what I want? The reviews for the non-Tivos
get pretty complicated for a non-techie. The RCA DVR 10
(http://www.rca.com/product/viewdetail/0,2588,PI700686,0...) sounded
good until I read that it requires a firewire connection. The Phillips
HDRW720 will record to a DVD (something I'd rarely use), but apparently
the remote isn't user-friendly and the instruction booklet is 80 pages!
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 9:12:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,alt.dss.tech (More info?)

>Gordon Burditt wrote:
>> It sounds like a simple non-Tivo DVR would meet your needs. Some
>> of them also do DVD recording.
>
>Yes, but it's finding this "non-Tivo DVR" that is the problem. Most
>seem to come with a TV Guide that I've read does not work with DirecTV.

Since you said you wanted it as a VCR replacement, I assumed you
don't CARE about the guide data.

>Others only have a firewire connection, which can't connect to my
>Toshiba TV. Any recommendations on a make/model?

>On the other hand, if I went with a real Tivo (now supported in Canada)
>and pay the subscription, I understand it still wouldn't change
>channels on my DirecTV receiver. In other words, telling Tivo to record
>the entire season of Lost really wouldn't do anything unless I made
>sure my DirecTV was set to ABC...correct?

TiVo can control other devices using the IR blaster, *if* it
understands the codes for that device. Or you can use the serial
cable, if your receiver will work with it. I thought a standalone
TiVo could control a DirecTV receiver, along with a lot of other
cable and satellite set-top boxes. A standalone TiVo with DirecTV
isn't the optimum setup (with a DirecTiVo you get two tuners, and
the TiVo subscription is less expensive).

Gordon L. Burditt
Anonymous
September 23, 2005 2:11:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.ptv.tivo,alt.dss.tech (More info?)

On 2005-09-22, looknfourit@yahoo.com <looknfourit@yahoo.com> wrote:
> simplicity. Now, if a Tivo WILL control the DirecTV receiver, then
> I've got a good substitute for the DirecTivo...though I'd be missing
> out on being able to watch & record two different programs. Any way of
> telling in advance if it will control the DirecTV receiver?

TiVos have no problems controlling DirecTV receivers.

--
This is my .sig
!