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Sound Seperation Question

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February 9, 2005 6:30:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I hope this is the right place for this question, if not I am sorry.

I am working on a project and have little knowledge of sound
seperation. What I want to do is have multiple speakers setup in
various locations and have the same sound emitting from them but at
different times. Is this done through a hardware process or when mixing
the sound? What equipment would you suggest?
Anonymous
February 10, 2005 7:44:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Tim wrote:
> I hope this is the right place for this question, if not I am sorry.
>
> I am working on a project and have little knowledge of sound
> seperation. What I want to do is have multiple speakers setup in
> various locations and have the same sound emitting from them but at
> different times. Is this done through a hardware process or when mixing
> the sound? What equipment would you suggest?
>

Taking your question literally, you need delay lines (hardware or
software) for each speaker. A single package may have multiple delays.

It would help to know the purpose behind your question as a more
practical procedure could be suggested. Are you trying to create
ambiance? If so, you can buy equipment that creates that effect.
Anonymous
February 10, 2005 8:27:41 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Tim wrote:
> I am working on a project and have little knowledge of sound
> seperation. What I want to do is have multiple speakers setup
> in various locations and have the same sound emitting from
> them but at different times. Is this done through a hardware
> process or when mixing the sound? What equipment would
> you suggest?

A better explanation of what you are doing would be in order.

Are you trying to do this live? or playback(s)?
Do you need to change the delay in real time, or is it fixed?
If you are doing it live, it is more likely that a hardware or
firmware solution would be appropriate. If you are doing it
in playback, doing it in editing/software would be more
likely.
Related resources
February 10, 2005 11:37:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

What I am trying to do is create a better snow goose electronic game
call.

Game callers now have one or two horn speakers set out into a decoy
spread. When birds approach the volume must be turned down but the
sound is still comming from on or two locations but there is nothing
natural about the sound and no real seperation.

My thought is that I could place 5 or 6 speakers in the spread and have
a constant back ground sound of snow geese at a much lower sound level
but then have different distinct honks comming from the six speakers in
different time frames like Dolby Stereo this would give it a more
natural feel. This would be playback and I am going to use digital
sound either an MP3 player or CD.
Anonymous
February 11, 2005 1:59:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Tim" <mallard1@madisontelco.com> wrote in message
news:1108096677.911891.17920@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> What I am trying to do is create a better snow goose electronic game
> call.
>
> Game callers now have one or two horn speakers set out into a decoy
> spread. When birds approach the volume must be turned down but the
> sound is still comming from on or two locations but there is nothing
> natural about the sound and no real seperation.
>
> My thought is that I could place 5 or 6 speakers in the spread and
> have
> a constant back ground sound of snow geese at a much lower sound level
> but then have different distinct honks comming from the six speakers
> in
> different time frames like Dolby Stereo this would give it a more
> natural feel. This would be playback and I am going to use digital
> sound either an MP3 player or CD.

Two thoughts...
1) Go out and record (or maybe just acquire already-made
recordings) of flocks of snow geese feeding. Get a good stereo
recording and play that back through a little MP3 player and
your two speakers.

2) Goose calls are pretty short. You could get about a dozen
different variations and use a programmable microprocessor
to feed them at semi-random intervals out to 2 (or as many as
you wish) outputs.

Either of those would likely be a marketable product to the
hunting market (assuming it is legal?)

>
Anonymous
February 11, 2005 7:48:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

You don't want delays. What you should be aiming for (in addition to the
geese) is having 5 or 6 different goose calls coming from the speakers,
one per speaker. That way the approaching geese will think that a flock
is at your location and be more likely to land.

That means you want 5 or 6 independent channels of sound one per goose
call. The speakers would be positioned as you might expect for a small
flock of geese.

Further it does not make sense to change the volume of sound as the
geese fly in. That is not what happens in the wild. Either the
approaching geese can hear the local flock or not. As they fly in, the
sounds they hear will get louder. That means you should keep your
speaker volumes constant at the level you would hear if there were real
geese present at your location.

Tim wrote:
> What I am trying to do is create a better snow goose electronic game
> call.
>
> Game callers now have one or two horn speakers set out into a decoy
> spread. When birds approach the volume must be turned down but the
> sound is still comming from on or two locations but there is nothing
> natural about the sound and no real seperation.
>
> My thought is that I could place 5 or 6 speakers in the spread and have
> a constant back ground sound of snow geese at a much lower sound level
> but then have different distinct honks comming from the six speakers in
> different time frames like Dolby Stereo this would give it a more
> natural feel. This would be playback and I am going to use digital
> sound either an MP3 player or CD.
>
February 11, 2005 11:52:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

During the conservation order starting at the close of Canada Goose
season electronic calls are legal for Snow Geese, they are so over
populated that they are destroying thier breeding grounds. Decoy
spreads consist of several hundred to two thousand decoys, as some
flights of Snow geese are in the thousands you need volume both in
decoy numbers and sound.

The reason I want to tone down the volume is that you blare the sound
when the birds are off in the distance to get thier attention, once
they make the swing to you we have to tone it down a bit or the birds
will flare since it is so unnaturally loud.

There are several distinct calls that the birds make to approaching
geese which is no problem to duplicate I just want it comming from all
angles instead of the one horn speaker that is commonly used.

With the MP3 player I could record tracks and use software to increase
or decrease the volume? 1 track for geese in the distance and others
for different stages of the flight.

Is there any trick to amplifing digital sound as apposed to analog?

Thanks for all the suggestions, getting a much better idea of how to
approach this.

Tim
Anonymous
February 11, 2005 11:57:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Tim" wrote ...
> There are several distinct calls that the birds make to approaching
> geese which is no problem to duplicate I just want it comming from all
> angles instead of the one horn speaker that is commonly used.
>
> With the MP3 player I could record tracks and use software to increase
> or decrease the volume? 1 track for geese in the distance and others
> for different stages of the flight.

Or just manually turn the knob up and down?

> Is there any trick to amplifing digital sound as apposed to analog?

No. It comes out of the MP3 player as analog. The fact that it
was stored as digital has no practical effect on amplifying and
distributing.
!