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Mic questions for speech only (no singing) under $500.

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Anonymous
February 20, 2005 9:36:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Background: New to recording. Using a computer, M-Audio MobilePre
(because it accepts XLR and outputs USB), and a Symetrix 528e voice
processor.

Need: A microphone for recording the male voice.

Questions:

1. Is there a "you can't go wrong" brand? I have seen a lot of
references to Audio Technica, and the reviews online for their various
mics seem good, and their selling price on Ebay seems to be pretty
good. (I take the Ebay sale price as a barometer of "street value.")

2. I am assuming that a condenser mic is what I need, not a dynamic. If
this is not the case, please let me know. Also, what about the "tube"
mic (the AT3060)?

3. I am under the impression, probably from TV or movies, that the
"side-address" style is the best one to get, if I'm going to be
recording sitting still in a room talking or reading. Is this true? I
look at specs and reviews, but the specs tell me all the thresholds,
which I don't really understand, and most reviewers are using them for
musical needs -- I haven't been able to find any equipment reviews for
people using them strictly for speech.

4. Where should I position the mic and myself? Do I put it right in
front of my face, or a foot away, or at an angle, or something else
entirely? I have a desktop mic stand and a 6" pop filter for it.

5. I "get" that buying a cheaper mic is doing myself a disservice, and
that I should buy quality if I want quality sound. But I can get an AT
mic for anywhere from $99 to $1,099. Along the way, there are mics at
$100 intervals from $99 to $599, then the jump to the $1,099. If I just
dismiss the top one, how seriously should I take the others? I mean, if
it's worth spending that much, then is the $99 mic garbage, relatively?
If the $299 is good, but the $399 is better, I'd rather wait and get
the $399 instead. But if the $199 is plenty good for me, and the
superior qualities of the $299 wouldn't bring an appreciable
difference, then I'd rather get the $199. I'm not looking to just sink
as many dollars as possible into a mic so I can feel good about it. I
really just want to create the best sound possible in my humble
"studio."

6. Are there any websites or books that will help me adjust my
microphone placement and voice processor? I have tried "trial and
error," and can definitely hear that some things sound lousy, but I
just don't have the know-how to "tweak" it into something that shines.
What I'm going for, I think, is to have the playback sound just like my
actual voice, without any deadening of the sound and brightness, but
also trying a little de-essing and, if possible, boosting the
intelligability of the actual words to make my recordings very easy to
listen to.

I know I'm asking a lot here, of pros who have put in their own time
and effort to learn this stuff. I do wish that this was something I can
"figure out" on my own, if I put enough time into it, which I'm willing
to do. But I think I need some direction to prevent me from spinning my
wheels.

Thanks all,
Shawn
Anonymous
February 20, 2005 6:26:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

<shawn.milo@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1108910173.131454.41460@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> Need: A microphone for recording the male voice.
>
> Questions:
>
> 1. Is there a "you can't go wrong" brand?

For speech? EV RE-20.

> 2. I am assuming that a condenser mic is what I need, not a dynamic. If
> this is not the case, please let me know.

No, not necessarily at all. Seriously, check out the RE-20, it's in your
price range, and is one of the (if not THE) most commonly-used mics for
speech.

>Also, what about the "tube" mic (the AT3060)?

I've only demoed this mic briefly, so I can't give you a detailed
impression, I thought it sounded pretty good for it's price point, but I can
see how it could get harsh/sibilant under certain circumstances. Could me
more trouble to work with for speech than ***THE RE-20*** :D 

Neil Henderson




>
> 3. I am under the impression, probably from TV or movies, that the
> "side-address" style is the best one to get, if I'm going to be
> recording sitting still in a room talking or reading. Is this true? I
> look at specs and reviews, but the specs tell me all the thresholds,
> which I don't really understand, and most reviewers are using them for
> musical needs -- I haven't been able to find any equipment reviews for
> people using them strictly for speech.
>
> 4. Where should I position the mic and myself? Do I put it right in
> front of my face, or a foot away, or at an angle, or something else
> entirely? I have a desktop mic stand and a 6" pop filter for it.
>
> 5. I "get" that buying a cheaper mic is doing myself a disservice, and
> that I should buy quality if I want quality sound. But I can get an AT
> mic for anywhere from $99 to $1,099. Along the way, there are mics at
> $100 intervals from $99 to $599, then the jump to the $1,099. If I just
> dismiss the top one, how seriously should I take the others? I mean, if
> it's worth spending that much, then is the $99 mic garbage, relatively?
> If the $299 is good, but the $399 is better, I'd rather wait and get
> the $399 instead. But if the $199 is plenty good for me, and the
> superior qualities of the $299 wouldn't bring an appreciable
> difference, then I'd rather get the $199. I'm not looking to just sink
> as many dollars as possible into a mic so I can feel good about it. I
> really just want to create the best sound possible in my humble
> "studio."
>
> 6. Are there any websites or books that will help me adjust my
> microphone placement and voice processor? I have tried "trial and
> error," and can definitely hear that some things sound lousy, but I
> just don't have the know-how to "tweak" it into something that shines.
> What I'm going for, I think, is to have the playback sound just like my
> actual voice, without any deadening of the sound and brightness, but
> also trying a little de-essing and, if possible, boosting the
> intelligability of the actual words to make my recordings very easy to
> listen to.
>
> I know I'm asking a lot here, of pros who have put in their own time
> and effort to learn this stuff. I do wish that this was something I can
> "figure out" on my own, if I put enough time into it, which I'm willing
> to do. But I think I need some direction to prevent me from spinning my
> wheels.
>
> Thanks all,
> Shawn
>
Anonymous
February 20, 2005 8:44:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

shawn.milo@gmail.com wrote:

> I know I'm asking a lot here, of pros who have put in their own time
> and effort to learn this stuff. I do wish that this was something I can
> "figure out" on my own, if I put enough time into it, which I'm willing
> to do. But I think I need some direction to prevent me from spinning my
> wheels.

Shawn,

Have you read the RAp FAQ?

http://www.recaudiopro.net

--
ha
Related resources
Anonymous
February 20, 2005 9:13:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
news:1gs9zsh.1boxd72eabhdcN%walkinay@thegrid.net...
> shawn.milo@gmail.com wrote:
>
> > I know I'm asking a lot here, of pros who have put in their own time
> > and effort to learn this stuff. I do wish that this was something I can
> > "figure out" on my own, if I put enough time into it, which I'm willing
> > to do. But I think I need some direction to prevent me from spinning my
> > wheels.

A surprising number of times, an excellent choice for spoken word is not a
condenser mic, but the Electro-Voice RE-20. I believe it's the most widely
used microphone at radio stations, and with good reason.

Peace,
Paul
Anonymous
February 20, 2005 9:43:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Paul Stamler" <pstamlerhell@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:Gr4Sd.249518$w62.224259@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
>
> "hank alrich" <walkinay@thegrid.net> wrote in message
> news:1gs9zsh.1boxd72eabhdcN%walkinay@thegrid.net...
> > shawn.milo@gmail.com wrote:
> >
> > > I know I'm asking a lot here, of pros who have put in their own time
> > > and effort to learn this stuff. I do wish that this was something I
can
> > > "figure out" on my own, if I put enough time into it, which I'm
willing
> > > to do. But I think I need some direction to prevent me from spinning
my
> > > wheels.
>
> A surprising number of times, an excellent choice for spoken word is not a
> condenser mic, but the Electro-Voice RE-20. I believe it's the most widely
> used microphone at radio stations, and with good reason.
>
> Peace,
> Paul
>

With 26 RE-20 mics spread through 10 studios and booths i'd say the good
reason is that they sound fine on almost any voice and almost any resonable
mic tecnique.

A few of the deep voiced male anouncers prefer the shure SM-7 because they
can use "proximity effect" to make themselves sound even deeper.

The senheiser md 421 and sometimes the senheiser md 441 mic are other
classic choices
Anonymous
February 20, 2005 11:38:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

shawn.milo@gmail.com wrote:

> Background: New to recording. Using a computer, M-Audio MobilePre
> (because it accepts XLR and outputs USB), and a Symetrix 528e voice
> processor.
>
> Need: A microphone for recording the male voice.
>
> Questions:
>
> 1. Is there a "you can't go wrong" brand? I have seen a lot of
> references to Audio Technica, and the reviews online for their
various
> mics seem good, and their selling price on Ebay seems to be pretty
> good. (I take the Ebay sale price as a barometer of "street value.")

ElectroVoice:
RE27, RE20
Shure:
SM7

> 2. I am assuming that a condenser mic is what I need, not a dynamic.
If
> this is not the case, please let me know. Also, what about the "tube"
> mic (the AT3060)?

I would not hesitate to recommend a dynamic mic for
for any use, provided a selection appropriate to the
source is made. The (above) 3 mics are dynamic.
The gratuitious tube included in modern condensor
designs is there to cater to 'vintage appeal' and
serves no purpose that can't be fulfilled by well
designed FET, or IC circuits.

> 3. I am under the impression, probably from TV or movies, that the
> "side-address" style is the best one to get, if I'm going to be
> recording sitting still in a room talking or reading. Is this true? I
> look at specs and reviews, but the specs tell me all the thresholds,
> which I don't really understand, and most reviewers are using them
for
> musical needs -- I haven't been able to find any equipment reviews
for
> people using them strictly for speech.

The side address and end address designs are simply
different styles of physical construction. Either are used
for various applications, although the most successful
early large diaphram condensors (Neumann, AKG, etc.)
were side address and their style had been copied ad-nausium.
Ty Ford's site deals with speech/voice-over applications:

http://www.tyford.com/

> 4. Where should I position the mic and myself? Do I put it right in
> front of my face, or a foot away, or at an angle, or something else
> entirely? I have a desktop mic stand and a 6" pop filter for it.

Many DJ's have a tendency to 'eat' the mic.
2-6 inches might be a good average.
With a mic with little or no proximity effect (RE20/27) you
can get quite close and retain a natual sound. A mic that
has proximity effect will boost the low end and sound bassy
when you get very close, within a few inches. You should
certainly stay in the mic's directional pattern. A slight
angle can help with sibilance, but I believe the 528 has
a de-esser circuit to help with this.

> 5. I "get" that buying a cheaper mic is doing myself a disservice,
and
> that I should buy quality if I want quality sound. But I can get an
AT
> mic for anywhere from $99 to $1,099. Along the way, there are mics at
> $100 intervals from $99 to $599, then the jump to the $1,099. If I
just
> dismiss the top one, how seriously should I take the others? I mean,
if
> it's worth spending that much, then is the $99 mic garbage,
relatively?
> If the $299 is good, but the $399 is better, I'd rather wait and get
> the $399 instead. But if the $199 is plenty good for me, and the
> superior qualities of the $299 wouldn't bring an appreciable
> difference, then I'd rather get the $199. I'm not looking to just
sink
> as many dollars as possible into a mic so I can feel good about it. I
> really just want to create the best sound possible in my humble
> "studio."

What have you tried so far ?
You seem overly concern with price. A more expensive mic
may have been built to design criteria that have little or
no relevence to your needs.
You might like the sound of the very popular Shure 57/58 ...

> 6. Are there any websites or books that will help me adjust my
> microphone placement and voice processor? I have tried "trial and
> error," and can definitely hear that some things sound lousy, but I
> just don't have the know-how to "tweak" it into something that
shines.
> What I'm going for, I think, is to have the playback sound just like
my
> actual voice, without any deadening of the sound and brightness, but
> also trying a little de-essing and, if possible, boosting the
> intelligability of the actual words to make my recordings very easy
to
> listen to.

You certainly need to learn your equipment and the settings
that will achieve yor goal. Where are you recording ?
What are you listening through ?

> I know I'm asking a lot here, of pros who have put in their own time
> and effort to learn this stuff. I do wish that this was something I
can
> "figure out" on my own, if I put enough time into it, which I'm
willing
> to do. But I think I need some direction to prevent me from spinning
my
> wheels.

Your goal is twofold:
1. Get the mic that will make your voice sound like you think it
should.
I would audition the EV's against what you have and/or the 57/58
2. Learn the knobs on the 528 and what they do and don't do.
Learn by doing, spend time with some mics and your preamp.

> Thanks all,
> Shawn

rd
Anonymous
February 21, 2005 12:08:41 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Sun, 20 Feb 2005 09:36:13 -0500, shawn.milo@gmail.com wrote
(in article <1108910173.131454.41460@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>):

> Background: New to recording. Using a computer, M-Audio MobilePre
> (because it accepts XLR and outputs USB), and a Symetrix 528e voice
> processor.
>
> Need: A microphone for recording the male voice.
>
> Questions:
>
> 1. Is there a "you can't go wrong" brand?
No

> 2. I am assuming that a condenser mic is what I need, not a dynamic. If
> this is not the case, please let me know. Also, what about the "tube"
> mic (the AT3060)?
Not the case

> 3. I am under the impression, probably from TV or movies, that the
> "side-address" style is the best one to get, if I'm going to be
> recording sitting still in a room talking or reading.
Not the case.

> 4. Where should I position the mic and myself? Do I put it right in
> front of my face, or a foot away, or at an angle, or something else
> entirely? I have a desktop mic stand and a 6" pop filter for it.
Angle, 4-6 inches. Talk across it, not at it. Use pop filter.

> 5. I "get" that buying a cheaper mic is doing myself a disservice, and
> that I should buy quality if I want quality sound. But I can get an AT
> mic for anywhere from $99 to $1,099.
AT2020 and spend the rest on room treatment.

> 6. Are there any websites or books that will help me adjust my
> microphone placement and voice processor? I have tried "trial and
> error," and can definitely hear that some things sound lousy, but I
> just don't have the know-how to "tweak" it into something that shines.
> What I'm going for, I think, is to have the playback sound just like my
> actual voice, without any deadening of the sound and brightness, but
> also trying a little de-essing and, if possible, boosting the
> intelligability of the actual words to make my recordings very easy to
> listen to.

If my first book were still in print, yes. I'm currently re-writing it and
I'm only on the first chapter. WAIT! I do have 1-2 copies on a shelf
somewhere. $25 and it's yours. If you were able to come to my studio in
Baltimore, I could spend 2 hours with you and "fill you up."

> I know I'm asking a lot here, of pros who have put in their own time
> and effort to learn this stuff. I do wish that this was something I can
> "figure out" on my own, if I put enough time into it, which I'm willing
> to do. But I think I need some direction to prevent me from spinning my
> wheels.

On your own is good! If you want to find out more about mics, preamps. the
528 etc, visit my website review archives.

Regards,

Ty Ford




-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
Anonymous
February 21, 2005 7:49:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

shawn.milo@gmail.com wrote:

> Background: New to recording. Using a computer, M-Audio MobilePre
> (because it accepts XLR and outputs USB), and a Symetrix 528e voice
> processor.
>
> Need: A microphone for recording the male voice.
>
> Questions:
>
> 1. Is there a "you can't go wrong" brand? I have seen a lot of
> references to Audio Technica, and the reviews online for their
various
> mics seem good, and their selling price on Ebay seems to be pretty
> good. (I take the Ebay sale price as a barometer of "street value.")

ElectroVoice:
RE27, RE20
Shure:
SM7

> 2. I am assuming that a condenser mic is what I need, not a dynamic.
If
> this is not the case, please let me know. Also, what about the "tube"
> mic (the AT3060)?

I would not hesitate to recommend a dynamic mic for
for any use, provided a selection appropriate to the
source is made. The (above) 3 mics are dynamic.
The gratuitious tube included in modern condensor
designs is there to cater to 'vintage appeal' and
serves no purpose that can't be fulfilled by well
designed FET, or IC circuits.

> 3. I am under the impression, probably from TV or movies, that the
> "side-address" style is the best one to get, if I'm going to be
> recording sitting still in a room talking or reading. Is this true? I
> look at specs and reviews, but the specs tell me all the thresholds,
> which I don't really understand, and most reviewers are using them
for
> musical needs -- I haven't been able to find any equipment reviews
for
> people using them strictly for speech.

The side address and end address designs are simply
different styles of physical construction. Either are used
for various applications, although the most successful
early large diaphram condensors (Neumann, AKG, etc.)
were side address and their style had been copied ad-nausium.
Ty Ford's site deals with speech/voice-over applications:

http://www.tyford.com/

> 4. Where should I position the mic and myself? Do I put it right in
> front of my face, or a foot away, or at an angle, or something else
> entirely? I have a desktop mic stand and a 6" pop filter for it.

Many DJ's have a tendency to 'eat' the mic.
2-6 inches might be a good average.
With a mic with little or no proximity effect (RE20/27) you
can get quite close and retain a natual sound. A mic that
has proximity effect will boost the low end and sound bassy
when you get very close, within a few inches. You should
certainly stay in the mic's directional pattern. A slight
angle can help with sibilance, but I believe the 528 has
a de-esser circuit to help with this.

> 5. I "get" that buying a cheaper mic is doing myself a disservice,
and
> that I should buy quality if I want quality sound. But I can get an
AT
> mic for anywhere from $99 to $1,099. Along the way, there are mics at
> $100 intervals from $99 to $599, then the jump to the $1,099. If I
just
> dismiss the top one, how seriously should I take the others? I mean,
if
> it's worth spending that much, then is the $99 mic garbage,
relatively?
> If the $299 is good, but the $399 is better, I'd rather wait and get
> the $399 instead. But if the $199 is plenty good for me, and the
> superior qualities of the $299 wouldn't bring an appreciable
> difference, then I'd rather get the $199. I'm not looking to just
sink
> as many dollars as possible into a mic so I can feel good about it. I
> really just want to create the best sound possible in my humble
> "studio."

What have you tried so far ?
You seem overly concern with price. A more expensive mic
may have been built to design criteria that have little or
no relevence to your needs.
You might like the sound of the very popular Shure 57/58 ...

> 6. Are there any websites or books that will help me adjust my
> microphone placement and voice processor? I have tried "trial and
> error," and can definitely hear that some things sound lousy, but I
> just don't have the know-how to "tweak" it into something that
shines.
> What I'm going for, I think, is to have the playback sound just like
my
> actual voice, without any deadening of the sound and brightness, but
> also trying a little de-essing and, if possible, boosting the
> intelligability of the actual words to make my recordings very easy
to
> listen to.

You certainly need to learn your equipment and the settings
that will achieve yor goal. Where are you recording ?
What are you listening through ?

> I know I'm asking a lot here, of pros who have put in their own time
> and effort to learn this stuff. I do wish that this was something I
can
> "figure out" on my own, if I put enough time into it, which I'm
willing
> to do. But I think I need some direction to prevent me from spinning
my
> wheels.

Your goal is twofold:
1. Get the mic that will make your voice sound like you think it
should.
I would audition the EV's against what you have and/or the 57/58
2. Learn the knobs on the 528 and what they do and don't do.
Learn by doing, spend time with some mics and your preamp.

> Thanks all,
> Shawn

rd
Anonymous
February 21, 2005 9:18:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

shawn.milo@gmail.com wrote:

> Background: New to recording. Using a computer, M-Audio MobilePre
> (because it accepts XLR and outputs USB), and a Symetrix 528e voice
> processor.
>
> Need: A microphone for recording the male voice.
>
> Questions:
>
> 1. Is there a "you can't go wrong" brand? I have seen a lot of
> references to Audio Technica, and the reviews online for their
various
> mics seem good, and their selling price on Ebay seems to be pretty
> good. (I take the Ebay sale price as a barometer of "street value.")

ElectroVoice:
RE27, RE20
Shure:
SM7

> 2. I am assuming that a condenser mic is what I need, not a dynamic.
If
> this is not the case, please let me know. Also, what about the "tube"
> mic (the AT3060)?

I would not hesitate to recommend a dynamic mic for
for any use, provided a selection appropriate to the
source is made. The (above) 3 mics are dynamic.
The gratuitious tube included in some modern condensor
designs is there to cater to 'vintage appeal' and
serves no purpose that can't be fulfilled by well
designed FET, or IC circuits.

> 3. I am under the impression, probably from TV or movies, that the
> "side-address" style is the best one to get, if I'm going to be
> recording sitting still in a room talking or reading. Is this true? I
> look at specs and reviews, but the specs tell me all the thresholds,
> which I don't really understand, and most reviewers are using them
for
> musical needs -- I haven't been able to find any equipment reviews
for
> people using them strictly for speech.

The side address and end address designs are simply
different styles of physical construction. Either are used
for various applications, although the most successful
early large diaphram condensors (Neumann, AKG, etc.)
were side address and their style had been copied ad-nausium.
Ty Ford's site deals with speech/voice-over applications:

http://www.tyford.com/

> 4. Where should I position the mic and myself? Do I put it right in
> front of my face, or a foot away, or at an angle, or something else
> entirely? I have a desktop mic stand and a 6" pop filter for it.

Many DJ's have a tendency to 'eat' the mic.
2-6 inches might be a good average.
With a mic with little or no proximity effect (RE20/27) you
can get quite close and retain a natual sound. A mic that
has proximity effect will boost the low end and sound bassy
when you get very close, within a few inches. You should
certainly stay in the mic's directional pattern. A slight
angle can help with sibilance, but I believe the 528 has
a de-esser circuit to help with this.

> 5. I "get" that buying a cheaper mic is doing myself a disservice,
and
> that I should buy quality if I want quality sound. But I can get an
AT
> mic for anywhere from $99 to $1,099. Along the way, there are mics at
> $100 intervals from $99 to $599, then the jump to the $1,099. If I
just
> dismiss the top one, how seriously should I take the others? I mean,
if
> it's worth spending that much, then is the $99 mic garbage,
relatively?
> If the $299 is good, but the $399 is better, I'd rather wait and get
> the $399 instead. But if the $199 is plenty good for me, and the
> superior qualities of the $299 wouldn't bring an appreciable
> difference, then I'd rather get the $199. I'm not looking to just
sink
> as many dollars as possible into a mic so I can feel good about it. I
> really just want to create the best sound possible in my humble
> "studio."

What have you tried so far ?
You seem overly concern with price. A more expensive mic
may have been built to design criteria that have little or
no relevence to your needs.
You might like the sound of the very popular Shure 57/58 ...

> 6. Are there any websites or books that will help me adjust my
> microphone placement and voice processor? I have tried "trial and
> error," and can definitely hear that some things sound lousy, but I
> just don't have the know-how to "tweak" it into something that
shines.
> What I'm going for, I think, is to have the playback sound just like
my
> actual voice, without any deadening of the sound and brightness, but
> also trying a little de-essing and, if possible, boosting the
> intelligability of the actual words to make my recordings very easy
to
> listen to.

You certainly need to learn your equipment and the settings
that will achieve yor goal. Where are you recording ?
What are you listening through ?

> I know I'm asking a lot here, of pros who have put in their own time
> and effort to learn this stuff. I do wish that this was something I
can
> "figure out" on my own, if I put enough time into it, which I'm
willing
> to do. But I think I need some direction to prevent me from spinning
my
> wheels.

Your goal is twofold:
1. Get the mic that will make your voice sound like you think it
should.
I would audition the EV's against what you have and/or the 57/58
2. Learn the knobs on the 528 and what they do and don't do.
Learn by doing, spend time with some mics and your preamp.

> Thanks all,
> Shawn

rd

ps - reposted due to not showing up,
sorry if any see it more than once.
Anonymous
February 22, 2005 10:34:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

<shawn.milo@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:1108910173.131454.41460@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com
> Background: New to recording. Using a computer, M-Audio MobilePre
> (because it accepts XLR and outputs USB), and a Symetrix 528e voice
> processor.
>
> Need: A microphone for recording the male voice.
>
> Questions:
>
> 1. Is there a "you can't go wrong" brand? I have seen a lot of
> references to Audio Technica, and the reviews online for their various
> mics seem good, and their selling price on Ebay seems to be pretty
> good. (I take the Ebay sale price as a barometer of "street value.")

There is even a "can't go wrong" mic - the Shure SM58.

Frankly, if you don't know what you are doing, you should probably get one
of these to learn with. It's like the industry standard vocal mic. They
don't cost a lot.
!