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Ear buds with noise cancelling and behind ear clips

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March 5, 2005 9:05:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I currently have a 5-10 year old set of Bose noise cancelling
headphones that work great when I go to the gym. They do a very good
job of cancelling a lot of the exercise machine noises that are
ambient there. BUT over the ear isolating headsets are WAY TOO HOT
for exercising. I have to periodically take them off and let my ears
cool off.

So I'm figuring I'd like the active noise cancelling, BUT within an
ear bud. And not just any ear bud. It should have some sort of behind
the ear clip so that it stays in place when I'm moving around.

Short of having active noise cancelling I would settle for ear buds
(my understanding of the definition of ear buds is that they insert
into the ear canal, as opposed to the type that fit sort of
perpendicular to the ear) that are held in place with behind-the-ear
clips.

Any recommendations?

Thanks,
\Samson
Anonymous
March 6, 2005 11:49:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Samson" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:sfsj21ld7ka94nnisv8ubrs2gvkotahtos@4ax.com
> I currently have a 5-10 year old set of Bose noise cancelling
> headphones that work great when I go to the gym. They do a very good
> job of cancelling a lot of the exercise machine noises that are
> ambient there. BUT over the ear isolating headsets are WAY TOO HOT
> for exercising. I have to periodically take them off and let my ears
> cool off.
>
> So I'm figuring I'd like the active noise cancelling, BUT within an
> ear bud. And not just any ear bud. It should have some sort of behind
> the ear clip so that it stays in place when I'm moving around.

IME if you use in-ear monitors (the Shure E2, E3, etc mentioned by the other
poster, Futuresonics, Etymotic, even Sony MDR EX71 or Koss "The Plug") and
fit the ear piece correctly and tightly, they will stay in place even if you
are very active.

In-Ear Monitors are not ear buds that sit in front of the ear canal. If
sized properly, they fit quite tightly. You can tell when they are tight
enough, because that will make the bass snap in. If they are loose, they
sound thin. They typically come with a number fittings so that you can match
your ear canal properly.

The custom-molded ear pieces are worth the money for many people, but they
aren't cheap and they aren't absolutely required to get a good fit. With
some earphones you can retrofit a molded earpiece if the IEM doesn't work
out for you with the self-fitted inserts.
March 6, 2005 4:27:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Thanks for the suggestions. As your suggestions are on the high end
side I can assume you are somewhat of an audiophile. Admittedly I
can't hear what you guys hear so it would be a waste of money for me.
Plus I am often using these headphones to listen to podcasts of talk
radio and low bit rate stuff so great quality is certainly not needed,
I just need to get the background noise down to a level where I am not
blasting the program material and wrecking my ears. I am not doing
critical listening.

I've found that the active noise cancelling on the Bose really does
work well at the gym and for vacumning around the house. Referencing
your suggestions I see that they don't have behind the ear clips so
maybe they hold in the ear canal well enough that I don't have to
concern myself with them coming off at the slightest nudge, like the
type that sort of cup the indentation on the outside of the ear.
Those type never stick well and fall out too easily. But maybe the
ear buds (that's what I've heard them called) might hold better.

I'll use part of your advise and try some in the under $50 range
first.

Thanks,
\Samson
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Anonymous
March 6, 2005 7:55:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Samson" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:sfsj21ld7ka94nnisv8ubrs2gvkotahtos@4ax.com...
snip
> Short of having active noise cancelling I would settle for ear buds
> (my understanding of the definition of ear buds is that they insert
> into the ear canal, as opposed to the type that fit sort of
> perpendicular to the ear) that are held in place with behind-the-ear
> clips.
> Any recommendations?
> Thanks,
> \Samson

I've tried the (relatively expensive) Sony Fontopia MDR-EX71 ear buds and
was rather disappointed*, even after I added a headphone amplifier to my
set-up and I'm pretty sure that I got a good seal. I note that Sony do not
quote any sensitivity for these buds, but tell us what magnet material
they're made from! (Have had better bass from the Sony over-ear hook types
when gently pressed against the ear.)
* and I've checked that ear wax isn't filling the small hole etc.

Recently I found a pair of low cost (£5) EXCEL CD287 All-In-The-Ear Noise
Reduction Stereo Earphones. (They're not ear buds.) For me, these work
well. They're simply ear-phones with a sensibly designed soft plastic
double seal around the tube to the inner ear. The seal has a good fit with
my ears, and they stay in place and provide good bass.

Haven't tried anything really expensive.
--
M Stewart
Milton Keynes, UK
http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
Anonymous
March 8, 2005 12:07:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Malcolm Stewart" <malcolm_stewart@megalith.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in
message news:D 0fcm6$gfd$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...

> I've tried the (relatively expensive) Sony Fontopia MDR-EX71 ear buds and
> was rather disappointed*, even after I added a headphone amplifier to my
> set-up and I'm pretty sure that I got a good seal.

After writing the above, have tried the Sony MDR-EX71s again. Changing to
the next larger ear-seal improves the seal and the sound, but they are now
not as comfortable as before. Seems as though quite a high pressure is
necessary for a seal good enough for low bass.
(and the detailed instruction sheet, only accessible after breaking open the
packing, does list the sensitivity)

--
M Stewart
Milton Keynes, UK
http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
Anonymous
March 8, 2005 12:07:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Malcolm Stewart" <malcolm_stewart@megalith.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in
message news:D 0ifug$h44$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk
> "Malcolm Stewart" <malcolm_stewart@megalith.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in
> message news:D 0fcm6$gfd$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...
>
>> I've tried the (relatively expensive) Sony Fontopia MDR-EX71 ear
>> buds and was rather disappointed*, even after I added a headphone
>> amplifier to my set-up and I'm pretty sure that I got a good seal.

Are Sony Fontopia MDR-EX71 IEMs "relatively expensive"? I don't think so -
in the larger scheme of things they are a notch above entry level. BTW, I'll
give an example of "entry level" - Koss "The Plug" @ 19.95 street pricing.
IEMs get interesting around $100.... and up!

> After writing the above, have tried the Sony MDR-EX71s again.
> Changing to the next larger ear-seal improves the seal and the sound,
> but they are now not as comfortable as before.

Can you get used to it?

> Seems as though quite
> a high pressure is necessary for a seal good enough for low bass.

That seems to be a global truth. Note the people who advocate custom ear
molds. One of the things they get for the money is a really good seal.

> (and the detailed instruction sheet, only accessible after breaking
> open the packing, does list the sensitivity)

What is it?
Anonymous
March 8, 2005 12:33:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:o MCdnbJ9HdQBnrDfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
> "Malcolm Stewart" <malcolm_stewart@megalith.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in
> message news:D 0ifug$h44$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk

> Are Sony Fontopia MDR-EX71 IEMs "relatively expensive"? I don't think
so -
> in the larger scheme of things they are a notch above entry level. BTW,
I'll
> give an example of "entry level" - Koss "The Plug" @ 19.95 street pricing.
> IEMs get interesting around $100.... and up!

It probably depends on what access one has to specialist suppliers. When I
bought the EX71s they were easily the most expensive items on the (earphone)
rack in the shop. Now that I seem to have got them to work better, the
price will probably seem less significant!

> > After writing the above, have tried the Sony MDR-EX71s again.
> > Changing to the next larger ear-seal improves the seal and the sound,
> > but they are now not as comfortable as before.
>
> Can you get used to it?

Yes

> > Seems as though quite
> > a high pressure is necessary for a seal good enough for low bass.

> That seems to be a global truth. Note the people who advocate custom ear
> molds. One of the things they get for the money is a really good seal.

I have a plastic custom ear mold for my over-the-ear hearing aid, and the
seal is so poor that it whistles very easily. The hospital said that I have
funny shaped ears, and nothing more could be done! (When listening via
phones and without hearing aid, I attenuate the sound levels going to my
left ear, and can now get a much better sensation of stereo than without. I
use the SoundProfessionals "Headbanger" amplifier. In case you are
wondering, I do not do this for a living <g> ...and it's a long time since
I sat on a listening panel.)

> > (and the detailed instruction sheet, only accessible after breaking
> > open the packing, does list the sensitivity)
>
> What is it?

100dB/mW; and 6Hz to 23,000Hz. (No limits listed for the frequency
coverage.)

Browsing in a different shop yesterday, it appears that identical, or near
identical, bud style phones are available under a different name, Hitachi or
Panasonic, can't remember which, but very similar price, £35.


--
M Stewart
Milton Keynes, UK
http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
!