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I can connect to an access point and ping computers but not the gatewa

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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May 4, 2012 4:27:05 AM

I am trying to use a Belkin F5D8231-4 v3000 wireless router set up as an access point to get connectivity in a bedroom on the other side of the house from where the router is. My setup is as follows: Cable Modem to NetGear N750 Wireless router Wan In. Wired static IP connections to the router are a DNS Name Server/Domain Controller set to 192.168.1.2 and a Workstation set to 192.168.1.3. In the same room I have a wireless static IP connection to a printer set to 102.168.1.8. In a part of the living room I have a music studio set up with a Cicso WGA600N Gaming adapter set as a wireless bridge. It's IP is 192.168.1.250. It's feeding into a lan port on an 8 way 10/100 switch to which I have a 2 wired static IP workstations, a PC set to 192.168.1.4, and a Mac Pro set to 192.168.1.5. The NetGear N750 is at 192.168.1.1. It's DHCP is enabled and the range is 102.168.1.11 to 192.168.1.15. I have an iPhone that connects through DHCP and usually ends up on 192.168.1.13. The 2.4Ghz channel is secured using WPA-PSK [TKIP] Channel is set to Auto and a passphrase is entered. The 5Ghz channel is secured with WPA2-PSK [AES] IT chose channel 153 and it's mode is set to the highest available with the same passphrase as the 2.4Ghz channel.

This whole system works flawlessly except I can't get a reliable wireless signal into the bedroom on the other side of the living room.

So, what I've tried to do it use a Belkin F5D8231-4 V3000 wireless router set up as an access point, wired via a CAT5 to the switch in the living room and placed on the other side of the living room close to where the bedroom is. I have the Belkin set as an Access Point, with it's IP set to 192.168.1.254, it's subnet mask to 255.255.255.0 and the default gateway set to 192.168.1.1. The CAT5 cable is plugged into one of the 4 LAN ports and the WAN port. I have the SSID set to be simial but not identical to the NetGear's SSID, I'm using the same Passphrase and it's secured using WPA-PSK [TKIP]. I also have DHCP turned off. The laptop I want to use with this access point is set to 192.168.1.7 with matching security and passphrase.

I connect immediately and signal strength is excellent. I connect to the internet, or so IE says I am, but using ping Ican ping any computer on the network through the AP using the laptop, but I can't ping the gateway at 192.168.1.1. However if I hardwire the laptop to the AP I can ping 192.168.1.1 (router) and I get to the internet. I suspect I've misunderstood what an AP really is or there is some conflict in the wireless realm I haven't accounted for.

Sorry for rewriting the Magna Carta for my 1st post, but I tried to give as many details as possible for the clearest idea of what I'm trying to do.

If anyone can help me get this sorted out or explain my error I'd be very greatful.
May 4, 2012 6:54:14 PM

I guess there's something wrong with the Belkin, because I set it up that way and it behaves the same. I can ping any of the other puters on the network from the wireless laptop connected to the Belkin, but I can't ping the gateway at 192.168.1.1. hence no internet. I was wondering if there was either some masking or a possible conflict because the Belkin is after the wireless bridge.
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May 6, 2012 4:20:23 AM

Also love the details, and it sounds like your network is pretty tapped down which rules out a lot.

Have you tried setting the Belkin as a repeater? It would be a little slower than running over the wire, but would also essentially drop the Belkin from your LAN. However, it would give you the "direct" point to point connection it sounds like you want between the bedroom and the WLAN. And why are you plugged into the LAN and the WAN? My gut says the Belkin is confused about that.

If all else fails I've had great success extending WLANS with pint cans, coffee cans, shoeboxes covered with foil etc... but this only works if your antenna is uni-directional, if it's central it's death to the other side.
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May 6, 2012 2:02:43 PM

g0rd0 said:
Also love the details, and it sounds like your network is pretty tapped down which rules out a lot.

Have you tried setting the Belkin as a repeater? It would be a little slower than running over the wire, but would also essentially drop the Belkin from your LAN. However, it would give you the "direct" point to point connection it sounds like you want between the bedroom and the WLAN. And why are you plugged into the LAN and the WAN? My gut says the Belkin is confused about that.

If all else fails I've had great success extending WLANS with pint cans, coffee cans, shoeboxes covered with foil etc... but this only works if your antenna is uni-directional, if it's central it's death to the other side.

I had thought about using it as a repeater, but it's an old N1 and doesn't have that option. I checked DD-WRT and it isn't supported, so that kind of kills that for me. I found a post on some site where someone did exactly what I'm trying to do with that router and it worked for him. I even tried taking it off the bridge and plugging into the Netgear and no joy. Then I removed the bridge and still no joy. As far as the LAN and WAN I must have been tired of typing and left out that I've tried it in both. Also I tested it by setting it up as a router and connecting it the the cable modem instead of the Netgear and it worked both wired and wirelessly. Lastly, I checked to see if there were any firmware updates and I'm at the last rev. For some reason it refuses to route to 192.168.1.1. I guess the last thing I can try is to move the Netgear to 192.168.1.2, or put the whole network on the 192.168.2.x subnet. Failing that I'm not opposed to spending a few bucks and buying a dedicated WAP. I'm just a bit concerned there's something else at play that would give me 2 pieces of useless gear.
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