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sticking audio cassette

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Anonymous
March 20, 2005 9:09:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I've googled all over the place and haven't found an answer to my problem.
I've got a series of interviews done several years ago on cassette tapes.
They've been sitting in non-archival storage for some time. Attempting to
play one back, I've discovered that it sticks, at least while at the
full-at-one-end, empty-at-the-other place in the tape. Playing,
fast-forwarding, rewinding, all bog down. A few hard slaps on the cassette
allows it to fast-forward a few revolutions before it bogs down again. Once
I've slapped and FF'd enough times, it reaches a point where the "full" end
isn't so full anymore and the tape begins to zip through the player. But
upon reaching full FF to the end, it bogs down again as the receptor end of
the cassette begins to get full. A few FF and Rewinds would, in my
experience, normally loosen the cassette up enough to play. But this one is
stubborn.

The information is very important, so any help here would be gratefully
received. On google, there's plenty of advice about preventing this
problem, but I found nothing about what to do after it has occurred.

Thanks.

Jim Beaver
Anonymous
March 20, 2005 10:03:31 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

When these tapes get old, the media that it is composed of may become more
ridged, thus requiring more than the normal amount of torque to make them
move. This is one thing that can happen.

It does not hurt however, to have your tape player checked out in a service
centre to see if it is able to supply adequate torque for pulling tapes.
When these machines get older, the rubber parts, such as belts, pulley
tires, and etc, start to dry out, and the performance of the mechanics goes
down. I have also seen capstan motors have to be changed, due to the lack of
torque. The tape machine may also require service.

--

Jerry G.
======


"Jim Beaver" <jumblejim@prodigy.spam> wrote in message
news:ws8%d.22665$hU7.16362@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...
I've googled all over the place and haven't found an answer to my problem.
I've got a series of interviews done several years ago on cassette tapes.
They've been sitting in non-archival storage for some time. Attempting to
play one back, I've discovered that it sticks, at least while at the
full-at-one-end, empty-at-the-other place in the tape. Playing,
fast-forwarding, rewinding, all bog down. A few hard slaps on the cassette
allows it to fast-forward a few revolutions before it bogs down again. Once
I've slapped and FF'd enough times, it reaches a point where the "full" end
isn't so full anymore and the tape begins to zip through the player. But
upon reaching full FF to the end, it bogs down again as the receptor end of
the cassette begins to get full. A few FF and Rewinds would, in my
experience, normally loosen the cassette up enough to play. But this one is
stubborn.

The information is very important, so any help here would be gratefully
received. On google, there's plenty of advice about preventing this
problem, but I found nothing about what to do after it has occurred.

Thanks.

Jim Beaver
Related resources
Anonymous
March 20, 2005 12:11:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Jim Beaver" <jumblejim@prodigy.spam> wrote in message news:<ws8%d.22665$hU7.16362@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>...
> I've googled all over the place and haven't found an answer to my problem.
> I've got a series of interviews done several years ago on cassette tapes.
> They've been sitting in non-archival storage for some time. Attempting to
> play one back, I've discovered that it sticks, at least while at the
> full-at-one-end, empty-at-the-other place in the tape. Playing,
> fast-forwarding, rewinding, all bog down. A few hard slaps on the cassette
> allows it to fast-forward a few revolutions before it bogs down again. Once
> I've slapped and FF'd enough times, it reaches a point where the "full" end
> isn't so full anymore and the tape begins to zip through the player. But
> upon reaching full FF to the end, it bogs down again as the receptor end of
> the cassette begins to get full. A few FF and Rewinds would, in my
> experience, normally loosen the cassette up enough to play. But this one is
> stubborn.
>
> The information is very important, so any help here would be gratefully
> received. On google, there's plenty of advice about preventing this
> problem, but I found nothing about what to do after it has occurred.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Jim Beaver

I once bought a commercially recorded cassette, and it stuck. Either
a part wasn't moving properly, or it was missing. I forget.

So I bought a blank cassette that was held together with screws,
and opened it up, discarding the tape and the reels it was on.

I then cracked the case on the commercial cassette, it had no screws
so I had to sacrifice the case. I then moved the tape and reels
it was on to the blank case. I closed it up with the screws,
and it works fine.

I've done this with some other old tapes. I had one I recorded
thirty years ago, and when I tried to play it last year, I realized
a bit was missing, so I moved the tape. The dollar blank cassette
I bought to donate it's case and other pieces is likely far
better than the cheap cassette I used back then, though of course
the tape is still as cheap as ever.

This transplanting should take care of just about every problem, except
for actual damage to the tape. I suppose you may be able to buy
replacement parts and simply fix the cassette, but cheap blank
cassettes are easy to get and cheap.

Michael
Anonymous
March 20, 2005 2:44:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Did you try using a different player?

Poly
March 24, 2005 11:14:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Michael Black" <blackm00@cam.org> wrote in message
news:6447bcd3.0503200911.36aac39e@posting.google.com...
>
> I've done this with some other old tapes. I had one I recorded
> thirty years ago, and when I tried to play it last year, I realized
> a bit was missing, so I moved the tape. The dollar blank cassette
> I bought to donate it's case and other pieces is likely far
> better than the cheap cassette I used back then, though of course
> the tape is still as cheap as ever.
>
Copying to another decent cassette would take care
of the cheap tape issue. That is what I do in most cases.
I make a copy immiidately after buying a cassete.

>
> Michael
Anonymous
March 24, 2005 12:36:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In <ws8%d.22665$hU7.16362@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com>, on 03/20/05
at 06:09 AM, "Jim Beaver" <jumblejim@prodigy.spam> said:

[ ... ]

>play one back, I've discovered that it sticks,
>at least while at the full-at-one-end, empty-at-the-other place in
>the tape. Playing, fast-forwarding, rewinding, all bog down. A few
>hard slaps on the cassette allows it to fast-forward a few
>revolutions before it bogs down again. Once I've slapped and FF'd
>enough times, it reaches a point where the "full" end isn't so full
>anymore and the tape begins to zip through the player. But upon
>reaching full FF to the end, it bogs down again as the receptor end of
> the cassette begins to get full. A few FF and Rewinds would, in my
>experience, normally loosen the cassette up enough to play. But this
>one is stubborn.

From the information given, we can only guess what the real problem(s)
is(are).

Obviously, the possibilities are:

Defective cassette player
Defective cassette shell
Defective or dirty tape
Poorly wound tape pack

Most of the cassette problems are fairly obvious and careful
examination of the cassette can rule them in or out.

Stick a pencil in the cassette drive hubs and wind the tape a bit. If
the tape binds, you have a pretty good hint.

Rewinding and then playing a tape will usually clear any problems
caused exclusively by a poorly wound tape pack. If you can see edges of
the tape sticking out, the pack is poorly wound. With a well wound
pack, you will have difficulty seeing individual layers of tape. The
pack will appear to be a simple disk. Dropping a cassette is a good way
to cause the pack to jam in the shell.

If the shell does not look perfect, place a good shell next to the
suspect shell and compare all the dimensions and angles. If you can
observe any differences with this simple visual test, move the tape
pack to a good shell.

If only one cassette causes trouble, suspect the the cassette. It is
possible, however, that the troublesome cassette is near the edge of
the spec, but your player is beginning to show its age. If the player
is involved, you'll start having more and more "problem" cassettes.

Inspect the cassette tape by holding the shell in front of you with the
long edge parallel to the floor, open edge on top. Reflect a strong
light (positioned well in front of you) off the tape surface while
winding the tape with a pencil. The tape ribbon on premium tape will
look like a mirror and be perfectly smooth (with some very minor
randomly distributed point sized imperfections) Low grade tapes will
have a dull surface luster. If the tape is folded, wrinkled, or
creased, your problem may be more complicated.

If the cassette has been stored in a very poor environment (damp or hot
or very dry), store the cassette in a more normal environment for a few
weeks and try again.

If the tape is super important, take the cassette player to a shop and
have the torques measured. It's a bit of expense and trouble, but
you'll be able to prove or eliminate one component of the problem.

-----------------------------------------------------------
spam: uce@ftc.gov
wordgame:123(abc):<14 9 20 5 2 9 18 4 at 22 15 9 3 5 14 5 20 dot 3 15
13> (Barry Mann)
[sorry about the puzzle, spammers are ruining my mailbox]
-----------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
March 24, 2005 3:34:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 09:36:25 -0500, zzzz@zzzz.zzz (Barry Mann) wrote:

>If the shell does not look perfect, place a good shell next to the
>suspect shell and compare all the dimensions and angles. If you can
>observe any differences with this simple visual test, move the tape
>pack to a good shell.

I've had a few recalcitrant cassettes, and in each case it appeared that
the problem came from the slip sheets inside the cassette losing their
"slip". No outside inspection would reveal this.

Since you can buy name-brand cassettes for $1 these days, transplanting
the tape to a new shell seems like a painless idea to attempt. Just pay
attention to the tape path when you open the new shell, and don't
overtighten the screws when replacing them.






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Anonymous
March 24, 2005 10:02:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 12:34:27 -0500, Kimba W. Lion <kimbawlion@aol.com>
wrote:

>I've had a few recalcitrant cassettes, and in each case it appeared that
>the problem came from the slip sheets inside the cassette losing their
>"slip". No outside inspection would reveal this.
MAny years ago I had a batch of 3M HO cassettes that were balky in
multiple machines.
Upon opening them, I discovered thes had multiple slip sheets on one
side. I reduced the count to one and re-seales the case and the units
performed properly in all machines.

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