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Waterproof Microphone

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Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 2, 2005 3:29:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I monitor and make digital recordings of the birds out in the bush using
a
Radio Shaque dynamic
microphone. When it rains, I must bring the microphone indoors. I need a
microphone that can stay outside 24/7/365 through rain, sleet and snow. What
type of microphone should I use?

Farmer John

More about : waterproof microphone

Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 2, 2005 3:29:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Fudge wrote:
> I monitor and make digital recordings of the birds out in the bush
using
> a
> Radio Shaque dynamic
> microphone. When it rains, I must bring the microphone indoors. I
need a
> microphone that can stay outside 24/7/365 through rain, sleet and
snow. What
> type of microphone should I use?

Use any microphone you want. Go to your local pharmacy and buy
a pack of plain condoms. Take one and put it over the microphone and
secure it with a rubber band. If the mike is short enough or
the condom long enough, cover the microphone body, the connector
and secure it to the cable. That will do a pretty effective
job of protecting it against moisture, dust and, uhm, other
contaminents. Seriously, it works well. (In a pinch, so to
speak, condoms have been used to convert an ordinary microphone
into a shallow-water hydrophone. For deeper water, a baloon can
be used, filled with castor or silicone oil in shich a dynamic
mike is immersed, the whole contraption sealed against leakage).
Experiment sound wise whether it's better with it stretched tightly
or hanging loose (it generally makes little difference in this
application).

The other problem you have to deal with is temperature. Any
microphone with a battery in it will have problems with cold
temperatures. And not a few electret microphone will also
have temperature issues. This suggests you might want to
consider dynamic microphones for low temperature recordings.

Consider any microphone that has a low-impedance, balanced
output. This will allow you to use longer cables with reduced
noise interference.

No, really, it does work.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 2, 2005 7:38:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Let me think about this for a while. There is the possibility you are
pulling my leg. I do have a 40 db amplifier right at the dynamic microphone
and I use a transformer from the amp to the 600 ohm line. There is
negligible noise. Seems to me stretching a rubber film over the dynamic
microphone would limit audio sensitivity. Besides, what would the birds
think especially if they are Catholic Birds?

Farmer John


<dpierce@cartchunk.org> wrote in message
news:1112461347.023044.209710@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
> Fudge wrote:
> > I monitor and make digital recordings of the birds out in the bush
> using
> > a
> > Radio Shaque dynamic
> > microphone. When it rains, I must bring the microphone indoors. I
> need a
> > microphone that can stay outside 24/7/365 through rain, sleet and
> snow. What
> > type of microphone should I use?
>
> Use any microphone you want. Go to your local pharmacy and buy
> a pack of plain condoms. Take one and put it over the microphone and
> secure it with a rubber band. If the mike is short enough or
> the condom long enough, cover the microphone body, the connector
> and secure it to the cable. That will do a pretty effective
> job of protecting it against moisture, dust and, uhm, other
> contaminents. Seriously, it works well. (In a pinch, so to
> speak, condoms have been used to convert an ordinary microphone
> into a shallow-water hydrophone. For deeper water, a baloon can
> be used, filled with castor or silicone oil in shich a dynamic
> mike is immersed, the whole contraption sealed against leakage).
> Experiment sound wise whether it's better with it stretched tightly
> or hanging loose (it generally makes little difference in this
> application).
>
> The other problem you have to deal with is temperature. Any
> microphone with a battery in it will have problems with cold
> temperatures. And not a few electret microphone will also
> have temperature issues. This suggests you might want to
> consider dynamic microphones for low temperature recordings.
>
> Consider any microphone that has a low-impedance, balanced
> output. This will allow you to use longer cables with reduced
> noise interference.
>
> No, really, it does work.
>
Related resources
April 2, 2005 8:08:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Fudge wrote:
> Let me think about this for a while. There is the possibility you are
> pulling my leg. I do have a 40 db amplifier right at the dynamic microphone
> and I use a transformer from the amp to the 600 ohm line. There is
> negligible noise. Seems to me stretching a rubber film over the dynamic
> microphone would limit audio sensitivity. Besides, what would the birds
> think especially if they are Catholic Birds?
>
> Farmer John
>
>
> <dpierce@cartchunk.org> wrote in message
> news:1112461347.023044.209710@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>
>>Fudge wrote:
>>
>>>I monitor and make digital recordings of the birds out in the bush
>>
>>using
>>
>>>a
>>>Radio Shaque dynamic
>>>microphone. When it rains, I must bring the microphone indoors. I
>>
>>need a
>>
>>>microphone that can stay outside 24/7/365 through rain, sleet and
>>
>>snow. What
>>
>>>type of microphone should I use?
>>
>>Use any microphone you want. Go to your local pharmacy and buy
>>a pack of plain condoms. Take one and put it over the microphone and
>>secure it with a rubber band. If the mike is short enough or
>>the condom long enough, cover the microphone body, the connector
>>and secure it to the cable. That will do a pretty effective
>>job of protecting it against moisture, dust and, uhm, other
>>contaminents. Seriously, it works well. (In a pinch, so to
>>speak, condoms have been used to convert an ordinary microphone
>>into a shallow-water hydrophone. For deeper water, a baloon can
>>be used, filled with castor or silicone oil in shich a dynamic
>>mike is immersed, the whole contraption sealed against leakage).
>>Experiment sound wise whether it's better with it stretched tightly
>>or hanging loose (it generally makes little difference in this
>>application).
>>
>>The other problem you have to deal with is temperature. Any
>>microphone with a battery in it will have problems with cold
>>temperatures. And not a few electret microphone will also
>>have temperature issues. This suggests you might want to
>>consider dynamic microphones for low temperature recordings.
>>
>>Consider any microphone that has a low-impedance, balanced
>>output. This will allow you to use longer cables with reduced
>>noise interference.
>>
>>No, really, it does work.
>>
>
>
>
Since it was DP that posted my guess is that the thin condom won't do
much to alter the sound wave.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 3, 2005 1:17:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

See if you can twist the Navy's arm to let you borrow a surplus hydrophone
but.... they probably cut off above 500Hz.

"Fudge" <fudge@nrtco.net> wrote in message
news:tJz3e.6735$x8.1154340@news20.bellglobal.com...
> I monitor and make digital recordings of the birds out in the bush
> using
> a
> Radio Shaque dynamic
> microphone. When it rains, I must bring the microphone indoors. I need a
> microphone that can stay outside 24/7/365 through rain, sleet and snow.
> What
> type of microphone should I use?
>
> Farmer John
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 3, 2005 3:01:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I was only joshing! Hydrophones have a superb upper freq. response.
But try this really useful one....
http://www.soundnetwork.co.uk/hydro.htm

"Jim Gregory" <jim.greg@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
news:%ZD3e.4184$OX5.3854@newsfe3-win.ntli.net...
> See if you can twist the Navy's arm to let you borrow a surplus hydrophone
> but.... they probably cut off above 500Hz.
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 3, 2005 6:57:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Jim Gregory" <jim.greg@ntlworld.com> wrote

>I was only joshing! Hydrophones have a superb upper freq. response.
> But try this really useful one....
> http://www.soundnetwork.co.uk/hydro.htm
>

Birds, Jim. Fish don't sing.

cheers, Ian

in message news:SCE3e.3850$vv2.3843@newsfe2-gui.ntli.net...
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 3, 2005 6:57:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Fudge" <fudge@nrtco.net> wrote

> I monitor and make digital recordings of the birds out in the
> bush using
> a
> Radio Shaque dynamic
> microphone. When it rains, I must bring the microphone indoors. I
> need a
> microphone that can stay outside 24/7/365 through rain, sleet and
> snow. What
> type of microphone should I use?

Duck feathers. Perhaps you could embellish a shuttlecock.

Or hollow out a bird. A condom might be noisy in the hail. You may
need a little heater so it doesn't ice up.

cheers, Ian
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 3, 2005 4:15:07 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I was illustrating that whales and porpoises make submarine sounds which can
be captured by such an all-wet-weather gismo; it may be needed to prevent
the ingress of H2O in any way.
But it will pick up percussive raindrops and hailstones landing on it as
well.

"Ian Iveson" <IanIveson.home@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:A4I3e.16060$C12.6821@fe1.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> "Jim Gregory" <jim.greg@ntlworld.com> wrote
>
>>I was only joshing! Hydrophones have a superb upper freq. response.
>> But try this really useful one....
>> http://www.soundnetwork.co.uk/hydro.htm
>>
>
> Birds, Jim. Fish don't sing.
>
> cheers, Ian
>
> in message news:SCE3e.3850$vv2.3843@newsfe2-gui.ntli.net...
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b C Monitor
April 3, 2005 4:15:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Jim Gregory" wrote ...
>I was illustrating that whales and porpoises make submarine
> sounds which can be captured by such an all-wet-weather
> gismo; it may be needed to prevent the ingress of H2O in any
> way.
> But it will pick up percussive raindrops and hailstones landing
> on it as well.

The production sound people that record sound for movies/TV
in inclement weather use hogshair to protect their mics from
rain and absorb the sound of the falling drops while still
allowing the desired sound through.

Go to groups.google.com, select advanced search and look for
"hogshair" in the rec.arts.movies.production.sound newsgroup.
!