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Dual speaker connections?

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Anonymous
April 11, 2005 3:08:07 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

I have a set-up with some very small speakers, including a pair of
Infinity wall-mounts, because of severe space limitations; and one very
big speaker, an old James B. Lansing Signature, which still gives such
wonderful sound that I can't let it go. I also have some other small
speakers that I have room to use, including three very old Sansui
SP-30's, a pair of Teac LS-MC85's, and some other odds and ends. I
have a receiver that has A and B speaker outlets, for a total of four
intended speakers.

Other than from the Lansing, I'm getting very, very little bass.
However, I also have an AudioSource SW 6.5 subwoofer, and a Yamaha
YST-SW100 subwoofer, neither of which I've actually ever used, but
either of which I could hook up. I'm wondering about a number of
different hookups using more than four total speakers/subwoofers, by
running MORE THAN ONE CABLE out of one or more of the receiver's
"speaker out" connectors. (I know that the Yamaha has through
capability for one set of speakers; but I might want to try for more,
or to try the AudioSource, which has no throughput capability.)

Is this "doubling out" of the speaker cables somehow fatal to any parts
of the system, or to the output? (I have the feeling that I did it
years ago, and didn't generate any noticeable problems; but I'm not
sure...) If not, what kinds of results can I expect, and what kinds of
side effects should I watch out for? Would the wattage (or whatever)
to the speakers just be cut in half for each speaker? (That might be a
good idea for the Sansui's, which have a listed maximum power of 20
watts.) Do speaker-pairs have to be balanced somehow in terms of the
juice they are pulling through the cables? Etc....

Any information and/or suggestions would be welcome.

Thanks.
April 11, 2005 10:23:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <1113199687.066525.253490@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>,
"New At This" <bgraves@telis.org> wrote:

> I have a set-up with some very small speakers, including a pair of
> Infinity wall-mounts, because of severe space limitations; and one very
> big speaker, an old James B. Lansing Signature, which still gives such
> wonderful sound that I can't let it go. I also have some other small
> speakers that I have room to use, including three very old Sansui
> SP-30's, a pair of Teac LS-MC85's, and some other odds and ends. I
> have a receiver that has A and B speaker outlets, for a total of four
> intended speakers.
>
> Other than from the Lansing, I'm getting very, very little bass.
> However, I also have an AudioSource SW 6.5 subwoofer, and a Yamaha
> YST-SW100 subwoofer, neither of which I've actually ever used, but
> either of which I could hook up. I'm wondering about a number of
> different hookups using more than four total speakers/subwoofers, by
> running MORE THAN ONE CABLE out of one or more of the receiver's
> "speaker out" connectors. (I know that the Yamaha has through
> capability for one set of speakers; but I might want to try for more,
> or to try the AudioSource, which has no throughput capability.)
>
> Is this "doubling out" of the speaker cables somehow fatal to any parts
> of the system, or to the output? (I have the feeling that I did it
> years ago, and didn't generate any noticeable problems; but I'm not
> sure...) If not, what kinds of results can I expect, and what kinds of
> side effects should I watch out for? Would the wattage (or whatever)
> to the speakers just be cut in half for each speaker? (That might be a
> good idea for the Sansui's, which have a listed maximum power of 20
> watts.) Do speaker-pairs have to be balanced somehow in terms of the
> juice they are pulling through the cables? Etc....
>
> Any information and/or suggestions would be welcome.
>
> Thanks.
>

It really depends on whether you wire your extra speakers in parallel or
series. Parallel wiring will lower the impedance, series wiring will
raise the impedance. Either wiring scenario one gains something while
losing something else. And there's just not enough information in your
post to say.

Google up some speaker wiring info, check the specs of your
speakers/amplifier and go to town.

IMO One would be better off just using one pair of good speakers at the
correct impedance for one's amplifier.

hth,

--
Cyrus

*coughcasaucedoprodigynetcough*
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 11:03:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In <1113199687.066525.253490@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com>, on 04/10/05

at 11:08 PM, "New At This" <bgraves@telis.org> said:

>I have a set-up with some very small speakers, including a pair of
>Infinity wall-mounts, because of severe space limitations; and one
>very big speaker, an old James B. Lansing Signature, which still gives
>such wonderful sound that I can't let it go. I also have some other
>small speakers that I have room to use, including three very old
>Sansui SP-30's, a pair of Teac LS-MC85's, and some other odds and
>ends. I have a receiver that has A and B speaker outlets, for a total
>of four intended speakers.

>Other than from the Lansing, I'm getting very, very little bass.

A general rule of thumb is that larger speakers have more bass.

>However, I also have an AudioSource SW 6.5 subwoofer, and a Yamaha
>YST-SW100 subwoofer, neither of which I've actually ever used, but
>either of which I could hook up. I'm wondering about a number of
>different hookups using more than four total speakers/subwoofers, by
>running MORE THAN ONE CABLE out of one or more of the receiver's
>"speaker out" connectors.

Beyond the second pair of speakers, most receivers will get into
trouble (smoke) when you pile on the speakers. Don't try to take this
analogy too far, but you can think of it as piling lead into a small
truck. While, it may look like there is not much "stuff" inside, the
truck is easily overloaded.

> (I know that the Yamaha has through
>capability for one set of speakers; but I might want to try for more,
>or to try the AudioSource, which has no throughput capability.)

Not a good idea. It's like piling more lead under the driver's seat or
adding a trailer and thinking that, because the lead is not in the
cargo bay, it doesn't count as part of the load.

>Is this "doubling out" of the speaker cables somehow fatal to any
>parts of the system, or to the output? (I have the feeling that I did
>it years ago, and didn't generate any noticeable problems; but I'm not
>sure...)

You were lucky the first time. Don't count on your luck holding out the
next time.

> If not, what kinds of results can I expect, and what kinds
>of side effects should I watch out for?

Smoke from the receiver. Unfortunately, the smoke will not be a warning
sign -- it will be notification that your receiver has given up the
ghost and is no longer with us. Even if you somehow get lucky and don't
kill it, your receiver's long term reliability will be reduced.

> Would the wattage (or
>whatever) to the speakers just be cut in half for each speaker? (That
>might be a good idea for the Sansui's, which have a listed maximum
>power of 20 watts.) Do speaker-pairs have to be balanced somehow in
>terms of the juice they are pulling through the cables? Etc....

It doesn't quite work that way. Even if the airplane is half full, you
don't get anymore leg room at your seat.

---

In general, adding a pile of speakers in a room does not result in
better sound. Certainly there might be sound in more places, but it
will lack overall focus. It's somewhat like having a large group of
people clean a small room. It looks impressive, but by the time
everyone gets done bumping into everyone, else you'll probably find the
lamp was knocked over and someone broke the mirror.

You may enjoy the results of using one pair of the smaller speakers
with one of the subwoofers.

If you really want to pile on all of your speakers, purchase a "speaker
selector" box that will safely expand the number of speakers that your
receiver can operate. Be sure to connect *ALL* of your speakers through
that box. Also, don't gang up speakers on that box. Connect only one
speaker per set of terminals. For example, if you want to connect four
pairs of speakers, purchase four pair expansion box.

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