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Building a Wired Network - A few questions I couldn't answer yet

Last response: in Networking
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June 5, 2012 2:56:45 PM

Hello,

I am taking my initial steps in building a professional wired network and I have a few questions I can't find answers to:

I am looking for all the materials I need to buy...

I bought several 100 ft strands of CAT 7 cable, for lack of being able to find an affordable bulk bundle.

I need to buy the RJ45 connectors (thats what I need, right?), to splice the wires into. Now I know this is probably just marketing that hasn't caught up with the new technology yet, but I can only find connectors that are rated, at the highest, CAT 6a. From what I understand about the technology, it shouldn't matter. But, I will let you guys tell me whether or not that is right! Feel free to suggest products! I need something to splice the wires into, and then the wall mounts... either female to female or some sort of shielded keystone jack. For those who have done this, please recommend!

Also for now, I really haven't figured out exactly what to buy for my distribution... I have a verizon wireless router right now. I am hoping I can call verizion and just get a regular 10/100/1000 modem. From the modem I want to go to a router/wi-fi router. What I do not know is if I need a switch. It looks like I do, but will it serve my purpose? I will be running 10 different wires to the corresponding rooms. All of these connections will have the potential to be gaming, and possibly have all running at once for gaming. Do I need a router to send out 10 different cables, or can I use a switch in there? It seems if I use a switch, and it is not assigning IP addresses to every cable, then we wont all be able to connect to the same game (given we will be coming from the same IP address???) or am I just dead wrong and it is ok if we are all sharing the same IP?

I'm going to leave it there and see what I can learn.

Thank you in advance!
June 5, 2012 6:10:10 PM

You will need something like this to splice and crimp the connectors onto the cable: http://www.amazon.com/Platinum-Tools-EZ-RJ45-Crimp-RJ-1...
Shop around for one you want now you know what to get.

The Access Layer switch is where users will plug their computers into. They should not plug straight into The Core or Distribution Layers.

Use a unique IP for each PC or you will have issues.

Also, Layer 2 switches (not layer 3 routing switches) use switch ports which can't be assigned IP addresses. They use an ARP and MAC address tables instead to forward traffic. So you basically just plug the PC's into the switch and it just works because they learn dynamically as traffic is sent and the tables are populated. As long as the PC's are on the same network as the router it's fine.
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June 5, 2012 6:30:02 PM

actually all you need is CAT5e cable and Giga switch.

and for more than one person to use the same ports for gaming at the same time UPnP on the router needs to be enabled.
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June 5, 2012 6:51:01 PM

Thanks guys!

I have been doing research, I selected this as my switch:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0044GJ516/ref=ox_sc_a...

It uses low power and has no fan, has 16 ports (what i wanted), and is 10/100/1000.

Here is what I got for the walls:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003JQL0S8/ref=ox_sc_a...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0047ZFHDY/ref=ox_sc_a...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002JP92K8/ref=ox_sc_a...

I hope those are the three things I need to make the wall socket. Please let me know if there is something else... I am not really seeing how that RJ45 connector is supposed to snap onto the wall plate.

Also, did anyone have an answer on whether or not I need to buy special RJ45 connectors for CAT 7 cable? I don't think I do... given all CAT 7 cable is, vs 6 or 5, is just a more tightly wound up cable. Because the number of twists per inch is greater, there is less signal loss over distance (so I read online), thus, converting to a straight signal over a very small distance (like an RJ45 connector) shouldn't do anything negative. But if you can shed any more light on this, please do.


Oh, amazon had a 5 dollar cable tester too:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000P1OA1O/ref=ox_sc_a...


I figured why not.

Thanks in advance! :lol: 

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June 5, 2012 6:52:48 PM

Simo606 said:
You will need something like this to splice and crimp the connectors onto the cable: http://www.amazon.com/Platinum-Tools-EZ-RJ45-Crimp-RJ-1...
Shop around for one you want now you know what to get.

The Access Layer switch is where users will plug their computers into. They should not plug straight into The Core or Distribution Layers.

Use a unique IP for each PC or you will have issues.

Also, Layer 2 switches (not layer 3 routing switches) use switch ports which can't be assigned IP addresses. They use an ARP and MAC address tables instead to forward traffic. So you basically just plug the PC's into the switch and it just works because they learn dynamically as traffic is sent and the tables are populated. As long as the PC's are on the same network as the router it's fine.



Could you explain to me what you said about Access, Core, and Distribution layers? I really am not sure what to make of that info. Thanks
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June 6, 2012 3:12:23 AM

DHCP can go through switches, so this is not a problem
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June 6, 2012 5:15:28 AM

bluebarron said:
Could you explain to me what you said about Access, Core, and Distribution layers? I really am not sure what to make of that info. Thanks

I wouldn't worry about it too much, it's just Cisco Three-Layered Hierarchical Model. You shouldn't need to follow it though, it's only for bigger networks and businesses who need massive amounts of bandwidth.

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