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lnb frequency on satellites

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Last response: in Home Theatre Legacy
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Anonymous
April 19, 2004 1:09:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

How does one know how to set the lnb frequency on different satellites.
Is it shown in lyngsat site for each satellite.
Or is there a formula, to figure it out.

More about : lnb frequency satellites

Anonymous
April 19, 2004 2:11:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

sat wrote:
> How does one know how to set the lnb frequency on different satellites.
> Is it shown in lyngsat site for each satellite.
> Or is there a formula, to figure it out.
>
>
The LNB frequency is set based on the type of LNB on a particular
dish. Once your get the LNB frequency set all of the satellites
received by that dish should be tunable.

Take care,
Rich

God bless the USA
--
Human beings were not meant to sit in little cubicles
staring at computer screens all day. Filling out useless
forms and listening to eight different bosses drone on
about mission statements.

---Peter Gibbons in "Office Space"
Anonymous
April 19, 2004 3:24:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

It sounds as though you might actually be asking about the local
oscillator(LO) frequency setting for the LNB. If so, then it's 5150mhz for C
band and 10750mhz for Ku band linear feeds. Ku circular feeds (Echostar and
Nimiq birds) should be set for 11250mhz.
Formula is too strong a word for the relationship between local
oscillator frequency and the range of frequencies transmitted from the bird
in question. Subtraction is the operator. Here's an example for you.

Galaxy 10R @ 123° west longitude transmits on both C and Ku bands. Looking
at specs for both C & Ku standard LNBs, you'll see that each has a bandwidth
of 500mhz. C = 3.7-4.2ghz, and Ku = 11.7-12.2ghz. Note too that the range of
frequencies tunable on a FTA receiver is generally 950-1450mhz. Again 500mhz
bandwidth. So if you want to look at one of the network affiliates on the Ku
side transmitted at 11.800ghz...... Take the transmitted frequency and
subtract 10.750ghz(LO frequency) to arrive at 1.050ghz or 1050mhz. That
frequency falls within the bandwidth tunable on your FTA receiver. Works the
same on the C band as well, just subtract 5.150ghz from the transmitted
frequency and the resulting frequency should fall within the range of
950-1450mhz.

It's a simple mathematical relationship and reminds me of AM radio where
2 frequencies are "beat" together to get a final frequency. Tech school was
a long time ago, so I could be wrong. Very wrong. I am however sure about
the values for the LO frequency. See www.daveswebshop.com , and look at the
section on LNBs. His explanation may be simpler than mine. Hope I haven't
wasted your time.

Good luck
MH
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Anonymous
April 19, 2004 3:15:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

thanks a million just what I wanted.
"Mike Hedgepath" <mhedgepath@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:jnIgc.47858$UC4.11729@bignews2.bellsouth.net...
> It sounds as though you might actually be asking about the local
> oscillator(LO) frequency setting for the LNB. If so, then it's 5150mhz for
C
> band and 10750mhz for Ku band linear feeds. Ku circular feeds (Echostar
and
> Nimiq birds) should be set for 11250mhz.
> Formula is too strong a word for the relationship between local
> oscillator frequency and the range of frequencies transmitted from the
bird
> in question. Subtraction is the operator. Here's an example for you.
>
> Galaxy 10R @ 123° west longitude transmits on both C and Ku bands. Looking
> at specs for both C & Ku standard LNBs, you'll see that each has a
bandwidth
> of 500mhz. C = 3.7-4.2ghz, and Ku = 11.7-12.2ghz. Note too that the range
of
> frequencies tunable on a FTA receiver is generally 950-1450mhz. Again
500mhz
> bandwidth. So if you want to look at one of the network affiliates on the
Ku
> side transmitted at 11.800ghz...... Take the transmitted frequency and
> subtract 10.750ghz(LO frequency) to arrive at 1.050ghz or 1050mhz. That
> frequency falls within the bandwidth tunable on your FTA receiver. Works
the
> same on the C band as well, just subtract 5.150ghz from the transmitted
> frequency and the resulting frequency should fall within the range of
> 950-1450mhz.
>
> It's a simple mathematical relationship and reminds me of AM radio
where
> 2 frequencies are "beat" together to get a final frequency. Tech school
was
> a long time ago, so I could be wrong. Very wrong. I am however sure about
> the values for the LO frequency. See www.daveswebshop.com , and look at
the
> section on LNBs. His explanation may be simpler than mine. Hope I haven't
> wasted your time.
>
> Good luck
> MH
>
>
Anonymous
April 20, 2004 3:15:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Apr 2004 21:09:14 -0400, "sat" <spam@nospam.com> wrote:

>How does one know how to set the lnb frequency on different satellites.
> Is it shown in lyngsat site for each satellite.
>Or is there a formula, to figure it out.
>

On most receivers you don't enter the IF, you configure the receiver
with the LNB LO, and enter the RF frequency given.

If you have an aolder receiver you enter IF into, you hold the mouse
over the RF, and the IF frequency appears in the bar at the bottom.
Otherwise you'd do RF-LO=IF for Ku, or LO-RF=IF for C-band.
Anonymous
April 21, 2004 1:04:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

its the LO of lnb that has me confused
How do I know to enter what LO of lnb for the satellite, my rececer covers
950-2150, I have a universal lnb so i have universal 1 that goes to 9??? to
10600, and univesal 2 goes 9??? to 10750.
looks like I could use either or at the upper range, in the 10600-10750.
So what do I do , I take the highest TP frequency of satellite and subtract
a 1000 for the tuner difference. and set the lnb at that?
Take T5 satelite one guy says 10650, other says 10750 other says?
whats the best setting? How does one dicide on the LO, is it shown in
lungsat somewhere?
Sorry to be so dumb but this is all new to me.
"Gary Tait" <classicsat@yahoo.cominvalid> wrote in message
news:f85980t2eiqqqbfpbv5p6k643qovqcv5hc@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 18 Apr 2004 21:09:14 -0400, "sat" <spam@nospam.com> wrote:
>
> >How does one know how to set the lnb frequency on different satellites.
> > Is it shown in lyngsat site for each satellite.
> >Or is there a formula, to figure it out.
> >
>
> On most receivers you don't enter the IF, you configure the receiver
> with the LNB LO, and enter the RF frequency given.
>
> If you have an aolder receiver you enter IF into, you hold the mouse
> over the RF, and the IF frequency appears in the bar at the bottom.
> Otherwise you'd do RF-LO=IF for Ku, or LO-RF=IF for C-band.
Anonymous
April 21, 2004 2:10:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

Man , you are torturing yourself! 9750 and 10600 ARE the "2" LO
frequencies you use with a universal lnbf. The universal type lnbfs cover
"2" DIFFERENT bands. Is the frequency you want to receive within the range
of 10700-11800? Then 9750 is the LO. You want to tune to 11600-12700? Then
use 10600 for the LO. DON"T let the fact that these 2 different bands
overlap slightly add to your confusion. All these specs are published
standards. Facts, not subjective opinions or anecdotes. Most importantly,
your receiver knows just what to do with the "properly" entered values.
After all, your receiver has a microprocessor, memory, and an operating
system. That's commonly referred to as a computer. Rather than a keyboard,
the input device is the remote control. Enter the values in your LNB setup,
and let the box do it's thing.
Again....see www.daveswebshop.com . In the section(clearly identified)
on Ku lnbfs, is an area explaining LO frequencies. If you read it, you'll
find answers. Read the specs for lnbfs as well as other components.
EVERYTHING I've related to you came from that particular web site. Typos do
happen, but are usually easily detected. For instance, the person who
advised an LO of 10650 to get T5. Probably just misspoke or hit the wrong
key. Look around and see if any credible dealer of equipment offers any
number other than 10750 for the LO to be used with a standard KU lnbf. Ain't
likely. 10750 IS the LO frequency associated with a typical Ku linear lnbf.
I'm NOT trying to give you a hard time. I had a bit of difficulty with
this subject myself only a few months ago. My first attempt was trying to
get Echostar-7 and Nimiq-1 for the music programming. I live in a radio
wasteland. I found and read repeatedly the section I referenced above. I sat
with the calculator and played with the numbers until.....Voila!( visualize
a glowing bare bulb ). Now I KNOW that 11250 is the LO to use with Ku band
DSS lnbfs. Self help isn't always instantaneous, but knowledge attained on
your own(or with a little help) is very gratifying. I don't wish to offend,
and hope I have not.

Wishing you success
MH
Anonymous
April 21, 2004 2:13:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

On Wed, 21 Apr 2004 09:04:33 -0400, "sat" <spam@nospam.com> wrote:

>its the LO of lnb that has me confused
>How do I know to enter what LO of lnb for the satellite, my rececer covers
>950-2150, I have a universal lnb so i have universal 1 that goes to 9??? to
>10600, and univesal 2 goes 9??? to 10750.
>looks like I could use either or at the upper range, in the 10600-10750.
> So what do I do , I take the highest TP frequency of satellite and subtract
>a 1000 for the tuner difference. and set the lnb at that?
>Take T5 satelite one guy says 10650, other says 10750 other says?
>whats the best setting? How does one dicide on the LO, is it shown in
>lungsat somewhere?
>Sorry to be so dumb but this is all new to me.

Read the specs on the LNBF, it should tell you.


>"Gary Tait" <classicsat@yahoo.cominvalid> wrote in message
>news:f85980t2eiqqqbfpbv5p6k643qovqcv5hc@4ax.com...
>> On Sun, 18 Apr 2004 21:09:14 -0400, "sat" <spam@nospam.com> wrote:
>>
>> >How does one know how to set the lnb frequency on different satellites.
>> > Is it shown in lyngsat site for each satellite.
>> >Or is there a formula, to figure it out.
>> >
>>
>> On most receivers you don't enter the IF, you configure the receiver
>> with the LNB LO, and enter the RF frequency given.
>>
>> If you have an aolder receiver you enter IF into, you hold the mouse
>> over the RF, and the IF frequency appears in the bar at the bottom.
>> Otherwise you'd do RF-LO=IF for Ku, or LO-RF=IF for C-band.
>
Anonymous
April 21, 2004 3:44:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

Mike you've been more then helpful but, after reading other forums, I got
misleading info.
top if off I just installed a motor and thats has to be resolved on fine
tuning . So I'm working from the simple to the hardest. Trying to get my
facts all lined up correctly, so I dont stumble on the basics, while trying
to rectify the hard stuff, the motor.
"Mike Hedgepath" <mhedgepath@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%7whc.70175$oj6.41318@bignews6.bellsouth.net...
> Man , you are torturing yourself! 9750 and 10600 ARE the "2" LO
> frequencies you use with a universal lnbf. The universal type lnbfs cover
> "2" DIFFERENT bands. Is the frequency you want to receive within the range
> of 10700-11800? Then 9750 is the LO. You want to tune to 11600-12700? Then
> use 10600 for the LO. DON"T let the fact that these 2 different bands
> overlap slightly add to your confusion. All these specs are published
> standards. Facts, not subjective opinions or anecdotes. Most importantly,
> your receiver knows just what to do with the "properly" entered values.
> After all, your receiver has a microprocessor, memory, and an operating
> system. That's commonly referred to as a computer. Rather than a keyboard,
> the input device is the remote control. Enter the values in your LNB
setup,
> and let the box do it's thing.
> Again....see www.daveswebshop.com . In the section(clearly identified)
> on Ku lnbfs, is an area explaining LO frequencies. If you read it, you'll
> find answers. Read the specs for lnbfs as well as other components.
> EVERYTHING I've related to you came from that particular web site. Typos
do
> happen, but are usually easily detected. For instance, the person who
> advised an LO of 10650 to get T5. Probably just misspoke or hit the wrong
> key. Look around and see if any credible dealer of equipment offers any
> number other than 10750 for the LO to be used with a standard KU lnbf.
Ain't
> likely. 10750 IS the LO frequency associated with a typical Ku linear
lnbf.
> I'm NOT trying to give you a hard time. I had a bit of difficulty with
> this subject myself only a few months ago. My first attempt was trying to
> get Echostar-7 and Nimiq-1 for the music programming. I live in a radio
> wasteland. I found and read repeatedly the section I referenced above. I
sat
> with the calculator and played with the numbers until.....Voila!(
visualize
> a glowing bare bulb ). Now I KNOW that 11250 is the LO to use with Ku band
> DSS lnbfs. Self help isn't always instantaneous, but knowledge attained on
> your own(or with a little help) is very gratifying. I don't wish to
offend,
> and hope I have not.
>
> Wishing you success
> MH
>
>
Anonymous
April 21, 2004 4:25:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

You've bitten off quite a bit. And while free advice is usually worth
what you pay, let me offer this. Take your time. Seems it's been about 5
weeks since I saw your post asking where and what to buy. You've clearly
taken the plunge, and that betrays enthusiasm. Don't let the details get you
down. I try to turn the discouraging results, and those "this ain't workin'"
setbacks into mini workshops. Breakdown the desired final result into the
phases of a bigger project; teaching yourself as you go. It's a confidence
builder.
Echostar-7 was cake. Early success made the minor hassles with Nimiq-1
easier to deal with. Just used a bigger dish, and I'm jammin'. My current
phase is trying to get G10R. Haven't succeeded yet, though I've moved the
dish around the property, and tried a couple lnbfs. The dish is a 1.2 meter
commercial fiberglass piece that could well be warped. I'll have to check it
with a straight edge. I scrounged it for nuthin', and have been determined
to make it work. Maybe stubbornness is the problem here. I've got a 1 meter
ex-Primestar dish and dual output feed that I may have to use. I'd hoped to
use it for T5 or something else. We'll see. I'm in no hurry for now. My
enthusiasm has been curbed, but I will prevail in time. I hope you reach
your goals too.

MH
Anonymous
April 21, 2004 5:48:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb (More info?)

thats what I like , to take something that was discarded and turn it into
something useable.
I make my pole from a discarded basket ball pole , welded up my own fixtures
and parts.
problem is I have many trees and have to shoot through open areas , so I
wont get certain satellites. I have to 2 put I dont know if its my
elevation or motor angle or pole. My pole was welded to a movebale bracket
after I installed everything 8 feet off the ground, its only out a
millimeter, way with in tolerance of the motor instructions for the motor
pole. They take 3 degrees off for motor sag and pole sag.
I use USUAls and it get mes amc5 and T5, I was thinking if I get my exact co
ordinates if that will decrease the error, cant play because its raining all
the time and windy. Have to research this.


"Mike Hedgepath" <mhedgepath@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:u2yhc.68007$Lh2.24658@bignews1.bellsouth.net...
> You've bitten off quite a bit. And while free advice is usually worth
> what you pay, let me offer this. Take your time. Seems it's been about 5
> weeks since I saw your post asking where and what to buy. You've clearly
> taken the plunge, and that betrays enthusiasm. Don't let the details get
you
> down. I try to turn the discouraging results, and those "this ain't
workin'"
> setbacks into mini workshops. Breakdown the desired final result into the
> phases of a bigger project; teaching yourself as you go. It's a confidence
> builder.
> Echostar-7 was cake. Early success made the minor hassles with Nimiq-1
> easier to deal with. Just used a bigger dish, and I'm jammin'. My current
> phase is trying to get G10R. Haven't succeeded yet, though I've moved the
> dish around the property, and tried a couple lnbfs. The dish is a 1.2
meter
> commercial fiberglass piece that could well be warped. I'll have to check
it
> with a straight edge. I scrounged it for nuthin', and have been determined
> to make it work. Maybe stubbornness is the problem here. I've got a 1
meter
> ex-Primestar dish and dual output feed that I may have to use. I'd hoped
to
> use it for T5 or something else. We'll see. I'm in no hurry for now. My
> enthusiasm has been curbed, but I will prevail in time. I hope you reach
> your goals too.
>
> MH
>
>
!