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What's The Right Bit Rate

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Anonymous
May 18, 2005 6:28:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Hiya,

I'm new to audio stuff so please forgive these basic questions. I want
to make some ambient (thunderstorms, white noise etc)CD's and DVD's for
sleeping. I used a small sound file, copied it and joined them together
with MP3 Direct Cut http://www.mpesch3.de/ until I have an MP3 that is
700mb. My thoughts are to encode the audio at different bit rates (64,
128, and 320) one bit rate per CD. By burning them as MP3 disks this
would give me hours and hours of sounds on one CD. Does this sound
right/ok? If not what would you recommend for a bit rate? Is there a
different/better way to do this?

If it helps or matters I am running WindowsXP and I have Adobe Audition
http://www.adobe.com/products/audition/main.html , Audacity
http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ , CDex http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/
and other audio programs. Any better programs?

More about : bit rate

Anonymous
May 18, 2005 11:29:51 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

greencap wrote:

> what would you recommend for a bit rate?

192 kbit/second fixed bandwidth mp3 is what I use to store off-the-air
FM recordings of classical music and digitized compact casette audio.

> If it helps or matters I am running WindowsXP and I have Adobe Audition
> http://www.adobe.com/products/audition/main.html

You are very well off with that software, not the only good audio
software, but one of the good products.


Kind regards

Peter Larsen

--
*******************************************
* My site is at: http://www.muyiovatki.dk *
*******************************************
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 11:02:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"greencap" <901@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1cf51ad421821bc0989bc6@news.snet.sbcglobal.net...
>
> Hiya,
>
> I'm new to audio stuff so please forgive these basic
questions. I want
> to make some ambient (thunderstorms, white noise etc)CD's
and DVD's for
> sleeping. I used a small sound file, copied it and joined
them together
> with MP3 Direct Cut http://www.mpesch3.de/ until I have an
MP3 that is
> 700mb. My thoughts are to encode the audio at different
bit rates (64,
> 128, and 320) one bit rate per CD. By burning them as MP3
disks this
> would give me hours and hours of sounds on one CD. Does
this sound
> right/ok? If not what would you recommend for a bit rate?
Is there a
> different/better way to do this?
>
> If it helps or matters I am running WindowsXP and I have
Adobe Audition
> http://www.adobe.com/products/audition/main.html ,
Audacity
> http://audacity.sourceforge.net/ , CDex
http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/
> and other audio programs. Any better programs?

Audition is the pick of your litter.

It will do exactly what you want to do, and more.

Learning to use Audition is the audio equivalent of learning
how to use a wrench when fixing cars.
Related resources
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 6:51:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"greencap" <901@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1cf51ad421821bc0989bc6@news.snet.sbcglobal.net...

> I want
> to make some ambient (thunderstorms, white noise etc)CD's and DVD's for
> sleeping. I used a small sound file, copied it and joined them together
> with MP3 Direct Cut http://www.mpesch3.de/ until I have an MP3 that is
> 700mb. My thoughts are to encode the audio at different bit rates (64,
> 128, and 320) one bit rate per CD. By burning them as MP3 disks this
> would give me hours and hours of sounds on one CD. Does this sound
> right/ok? If not what would you recommend for a bit rate? Is there a
> different/better way to do this?

Yes, it's OK. two things, though:

1) check if you can handle mono mp3 files.
2) check if your player has a "repeat" function

Tim
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 1:35:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:HtSdnQ6xFveq7xHfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
> Learning to use Audition is the audio equivalent of learning
> how to use a wrench when fixing cars.

Whilst I think Adobe set the standard for photo editing with Photoshop, I
don't think they have achieved the same thing in music by buying Cool Edit.
It is quite possible to fix a car and never use an adjustable wrench
(shifting spanner), but use ring spanners and sockets instead.
Similarly it is possible to make as much music and edit as many wave files
as you like without ever using Adobe Audition/Cool Edit, since there are
*plenty* of tools as good or better.

MrT.
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 1:35:18 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Fri, 20 May 2005 21:35:17 +1000, "Mr.T" <MrT@home> wrote:

>
>"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
>news:HtSdnQ6xFveq7xHfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
>> Learning to use Audition is the audio equivalent of learning
>> how to use a wrench when fixing cars.
>
>Whilst I think Adobe set the standard for photo editing with Photoshop, I
>don't think they have achieved the same thing in music by buying Cool Edit.
>It is quite possible to fix a car and never use an adjustable wrench
>(shifting spanner), but use ring spanners and sockets instead.
>Similarly it is possible to make as much music and edit as many wave files
>as you like without ever using Adobe Audition/Cool Edit, since there are
>*plenty* of tools as good or better.
>
>MrT.
>

First thing - Photoshop isn't half the tool that Paintshop Pro is. It
is lacking some of the most essential tools, it is slow, and it
handles memory very poorly.

Second thing. No motor mechanic would ever use an adjustable wrench.
Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they are the tools of
choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an adjustable.

As for Audition/Cool Edit, I use audition, although in some respects
it isn't as good as Cool Edit - but that is to do with features rather
than quality. It isn't the only tool I use, but it is very easy to
learn, and intuitive enough that infrequently used functions are still
second nature.

d

Pearce Consulting
http://www.pearce.uk.com
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 1:35:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Don Pearce" <donald@pearce.uk.com> wrote in message
news:4293d7ff.123707109@news.plus.net...
> On Fri, 20 May 2005 21:35:17 +1000, "Mr.T" <MrT@home>
wrote:
>
> >
> >"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> >news:HtSdnQ6xFveq7xHfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
> >> Learning to use Audition is the audio equivalent of
learning
> >> how to use a wrench when fixing cars.

> >Whilst I think Adobe set the standard for photo editing
with Photoshop, I
> >don't think they have achieved the same thing in music by
buying Cool Edit.

I think that's true.

> >It is quite possible to fix a car and never use an
adjustable wrench
> >(shifting spanner), but use ring spanners and sockets
instead.

Over here in the colonies we are still saddled with auto and
aplliance parts based on what we call the Conventional
Measurement System (CMS- i.e., inches). Ironically, we used
to call that the English system, but the English wised up
and went metric.

> >Similarly it is possible to make as much music and edit
as many wave files
> >as you like without ever using Adobe Audition/Cool Edit,
since there are
> >*plenty* of tools as good or better.

There were probably *plenty* of tools as good or better than
the first wrench I ever used. However once I learned how to
use that wrench, I was in good shape for using the many that
were like it.

> Second thing. No motor mechanic would ever use an
adjustable wrench.

Missing adjective alert!

> Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they are
the tools of
> choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an adjustable.

OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
corroded bolts or bolts with worn exteriors that don't work
right with any *standard* spanner or socket.

OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
situations that don't work right with any *standard* spanner
or socket. Case in point would be a flare nut. No ring
spanner or socket can address it. An open-end or split
spanner is required.

> As for Audition/Cool Edit, I use audition, although in
some respects
> it isn't as good as Cool Edit - but that is to do with
features rather
> than quality. It isn't the only tool I use, but it is very
easy to
> learn, and intuitive enough that infrequently used
functions are still
> second nature.

Audition not as good as the predecessor CE? How?
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 1:35:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Fri, 20 May 2005 14:10:39 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
wrote:

>
>"Don Pearce" <donald@pearce.uk.com> wrote in message
>news:4293d7ff.123707109@news.plus.net...
>> On Fri, 20 May 2005 21:35:17 +1000, "Mr.T" <MrT@home>
>wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
>> >news:HtSdnQ6xFveq7xHfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
>> >> Learning to use Audition is the audio equivalent of
>learning
>> >> how to use a wrench when fixing cars.
>
>> >Whilst I think Adobe set the standard for photo editing
>with Photoshop, I
>> >don't think they have achieved the same thing in music by
>buying Cool Edit.
>
>I think that's true.
>
>> >It is quite possible to fix a car and never use an
>adjustable wrench
>> >(shifting spanner), but use ring spanners and sockets
>instead.
>
>Over here in the colonies we are still saddled with auto and
>aplliance parts based on what we call the Conventional
>Measurement System (CMS- i.e., inches). Ironically, we used
>to call that the English system, but the English wised up
>and went metric.
>
>> >Similarly it is possible to make as much music and edit
>as many wave files
>> >as you like without ever using Adobe Audition/Cool Edit,
>since there are
>> >*plenty* of tools as good or better.
>
>There were probably *plenty* of tools as good or better than
>the first wrench I ever used. However once I learned how to
>use that wrench, I was in good shape for using the many that
>were like it.
>
>> Second thing. No motor mechanic would ever use an
>adjustable wrench.
>
>Missing adjective alert!
>
No adjective needed.

>> Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they are
>the tools of
>> choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an adjustable.
>
>OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
>corroded bolts or bolts with worn exteriors that don't work
>right with any *standard* spanner or socket.
>
>OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
>situations that don't work right with any *standard* spanner
>or socket. Case in point would be a flare nut. No ring
>spanner or socket can address it. An open-end or split
>spanner is required.
>
Open ended sure. I was making the comparison with the adjustable.

>> As for Audition/Cool Edit, I use audition, although in
>some respects
>> it isn't as good as Cool Edit - but that is to do with
>features rather
>> than quality. It isn't the only tool I use, but it is very
>easy to
>> learn, and intuitive enough that infrequently used
>functions are still
>> second nature.
>
>Audition not as good as the predecessor CE? How?
>

Creation of CDs.

d

Pearce Consulting
http://www.pearce.uk.com
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 1:35:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <KPidna1Jjt6CtRPfRVn-2Q@comcast.com>, arnyk@hotpop.com says...

>
>> Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they are
>the tools of
>> choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an adjustable.
>
>OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
>corroded bolts or bolts with worn exteriors that don't work
>right with any *standard* spanner or socket.

There are, but an adjustable wrench would not be the proper tool to use.
Adjustable wrenches will just make the problem worse. I would use a liquid
penetrant and a socket that would fit over the corroded nut. This method
has always worked for me.
----------------
Alex
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 1:35:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Don Pearce" <donald@pearce.uk.com> wrote in message
news:42952e12.145742500@news.plus.net...
> On Fri, 20 May 2005 14:10:39 -0400, "Arny Krueger"
<arnyk@hotpop.com>
> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Don Pearce" <donald@pearce.uk.com> wrote in message
> >news:4293d7ff.123707109@news.plus.net...
> >> On Fri, 20 May 2005 21:35:17 +1000, "Mr.T" <MrT@home>
> >wrote:
> >>
> >> >
> >> >"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> >> >news:HtSdnQ6xFveq7xHfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
> >> >> Learning to use Audition is the audio equivalent of
> >learning
> >> >> how to use a wrench when fixing cars.
> >
> >> >Whilst I think Adobe set the standard for photo
editing
> >with Photoshop, I
> >> >don't think they have achieved the same thing in music
by
> >buying Cool Edit.
> >
> >I think that's true.
> >
> >> >It is quite possible to fix a car and never use an
> >adjustable wrench
> >> >(shifting spanner), but use ring spanners and sockets
> >instead.
> >
> >Over here in the colonies we are still saddled with auto
and
> >aplliance parts based on what we call the Conventional
> >Measurement System (CMS- i.e., inches). Ironically, we
used
> >to call that the English system, but the English wised up
> >and went metric.
> >
> >> >Similarly it is possible to make as much music and
edit
> >as many wave files
> >> >as you like without ever using Adobe Audition/Cool
Edit,
> >since there are
> >> >*plenty* of tools as good or better.
> >
> >There were probably *plenty* of tools as good or better
than
> >the first wrench I ever used. However once I learned how
to
> >use that wrench, I was in good shape for using the many
that
> >were like it.
> >
> >> Second thing. No motor mechanic would ever use an
> >adjustable wrench.
> >
> >Missing adjective alert!
> >
> No adjective needed.
>
> >> Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they are
> >the tools of
> >> choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an
adjustable.
> >
> >OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
> >corroded bolts or bolts with worn exteriors that don't
work
> >right with any *standard* spanner or socket.
> >
> >OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
> >situations that don't work right with any *standard*
spanner
> >or socket. Case in point would be a flare nut. No ring
> >spanner or socket can address it. An open-end or split
> >spanner is required.
> >
> Open ended sure. I was making the comparison with the
adjustable.
>
> >> As for Audition/Cool Edit, I use audition, although in
> >some respects
> >> it isn't as good as Cool Edit - but that is to do with
> >features rather
> >> than quality. It isn't the only tool I use, but it is
very
> >easy to
> >> learn, and intuitive enough that infrequently used
> >functions are still
> >> second nature.
> >
> >Audition not as good as the predecessor CE? How?
> >
>
> Creation of CDs.

You're saying that the Audition 1.5 CD burning facility is
not as good as the CEP 2.1 beta product?
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 1:35:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Alex Rodriguez" <adr5@columbia.edu> wrote in message
news:D 6lhhd$pi$8@newsmaster.cc.columbia.edu...
> In article <KPidna1Jjt6CtRPfRVn-2Q@comcast.com>,
arnyk@hotpop.com says...
>
> >
> >> Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they are
> >the tools of
> >> choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an
adjustable.
> >
> >OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
> >corroded bolts or bolts with worn exteriors that don't
work
> >right with any *standard* spanner or socket.
>
> There are, but an adjustable wrench would not be the
proper tool to use.

Are you perchance limiting adjustable wrenches to what we
call Crescent wrenches over here?

> Adjustable wrenches will just make the problem worse.

There are adjustable wrenches and there are adjustable
wrenches.

>I would use a liquid
> penetrant and a socket that would fit over the corroded
nut.

Do you have fractional sized wrenches for nuts that have
corroded to an in-between size?

> This method has always worked for me.

Do much exhaust system work?
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 2:48:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Don Pearce" <donald@pearce.uk.com> wrote in message
news:4293d7ff.123707109@news.plus.net...
> On Fri, 20 May 2005 21:35:17 +1000, "Mr.T" <MrT@home> wrote:
> >"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
> >news:HtSdnQ6xFveq7xHfRVn-3w@comcast.com...
> >> Learning to use Audition is the audio equivalent of learning
> >> how to use a wrench when fixing cars.
> >
> >Whilst I think Adobe set the standard for photo editing with Photoshop, I
> >don't think they have achieved the same thing in music by buying Cool
Edit.
> >It is quite possible to fix a car and never use an adjustable wrench
> >(shifting spanner), but use ring spanners and sockets instead.
> >Similarly it is possible to make as much music and edit as many wave
files
> >as you like without ever using Adobe Audition/Cool Edit, since there are
> >*plenty* of tools as good or better.
>
> First thing - Photoshop isn't half the tool that Paintshop Pro is. It
> is lacking some of the most essential tools, it is slow, and it
> handles memory very poorly.

Firstly I made no claims of superiority (although I do prefer it to PSP) it
*IS* however pretty much the standard for graphics professionals.
I doubt any use PSP.

> Second thing. No motor mechanic would ever use an adjustable wrench.
> Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they are the tools of
> choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an adjustable.

Agreed, and many would say the same about Audition.
The closest thing to an industry standard is Pro Tools.

MrT.
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 4:57:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:H8GdncmlqqzUHBPfRVn-vw@comcast.com...
>
> "Alex Rodriguez" <adr5@columbia.edu> wrote in message
> news:D 6lhhd$pi$8@newsmaster.cc.columbia.edu...
> > In article <KPidna1Jjt6CtRPfRVn-2Q@comcast.com>,
> arnyk@hotpop.com says...
> >
> > >
> > >> Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they are
> > >the tools of
> > >> choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an
> adjustable.
> > >
> > >OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
> > >corroded bolts or bolts with worn exteriors that don't
> work
> > >right with any *standard* spanner or socket.
> >
> > There are, but an adjustable wrench would not be the
> proper tool to use.
>
> Are you perchance limiting adjustable wrenches to what we
> call Crescent wrenches over here?
>
> > Adjustable wrenches will just make the problem worse.
>
> There are adjustable wrenches and there are adjustable
> wrenches.
>
> >I would use a liquid
> > penetrant and a socket that would fit over the corroded
> nut.
>
> Do you have fractional sized wrenches for nuts that have
> corroded to an in-between size?
>
> > This method has always worked for me.
>
> Do much exhaust system work?
>
>
>
>

I always keep a set of those cheesy Craftsman sockets around just for that
purpose. You find the closest fit and pound it on there. Works almost every
time, and if the socket should break, they'll give you another one.
Craftsman tools are also good for cutting up and making special purpose
tools, although this does void the warranty. One caveat: never use 12 point
sockets, only 6. 12's are useless for anything but brand new hardware, or
hardware that is that tight to begin with. Adjustable wrenches make good
hammers in a pinch, not much else, though.


EK
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 10:33:22 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Fri, 20 May 2005 16:33:31 -0400, Alex Rodriguez <adr5@columbia.edu>
wrote:

>In article <KPidna1Jjt6CtRPfRVn-2Q@comcast.com>, arnyk@hotpop.com says...
>
>>
>>> Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they are
>>the tools of
>>> choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an adjustable.
>>
>>OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
>>corroded bolts or bolts with worn exteriors that don't work
>>right with any *standard* spanner or socket.
>
>There are, but an adjustable wrench would not be the proper tool to use.
>Adjustable wrenches will just make the problem worse. I would use a liquid
>penetrant and a socket that would fit over the corroded nut. This method
>has always worked for me.

Agreed - and if you have socket sets both in imperial and metric
sizes, there's usually one which will jam-fit over the offending nut.

OTOH, I do also have a couple of Mole wrenches, and the obligatory
Stilson aka Monke wrench, for those moments when nothing but brute
force and ignorance will do.............. :-)
--

Stewart Pinkerton | Music is Art - Audio is Engineering
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 10:51:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

"Stewart Pinkerton" <patent3@dircon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:lblt815vipmqj3uddi2jffm5k2klvp5vhp@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 20 May 2005 16:33:31 -0400, Alex Rodriguez
<adr5@columbia.edu>
> wrote:

> >In article <KPidna1Jjt6CtRPfRVn-2Q@comcast.com>,
arnyk@hotpop.com says...

> >>> Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they
are the tools of
> >>> choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an
adjustable.

> >>OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
> >>corroded bolts or bolts with worn exteriors that don't
work
> >>right with any *standard* spanner or socket.

> >There are, but an adjustable wrench would not be the
proper tool to use.

At times a Mole wrench is the tool of choice for
badly-rusted nuts. Obviously one starts out with the neat,
clean tools like ring-end and open-end non-adjustable
wrenches. But, they do not always get the job done. Oils and
heating can also loosen rusted nuts, but not always well
enough.

> >Adjustable wrenches will just make the problem worse. I
would use a liquid
> >penetrant and a socket that would fit over the corroded
nut. This method
> >has always worked for me.

> Agreed - and if you have socket sets both in imperial and
metric
> sizes, there's usually one which will jam-fit over the
offending nut.

I have both metric and imperial open-end, split-end,
ring-end, wrenches; along with plain sockets and deep well
sockets, nut drivers, and from time to time, no joy.

My court of last resort is composed of drills, grinding
tools, and nut splitters.

Recently even muffler hardware (historically soft iron scum
of the earth) has been showing up in the form of
high-strength steel that ruins HHS bits in a heartbeat. It
seems to rust better, too. So, now the grinders and cobalt
drills come into play.

> OTOH, I do also have a couple of Mole wrenches, and the
obligatory
> Stilson aka Monke wrench, for those moments when nothing
but brute
> force and ignorance will do.............. :-)

Mole wrenches are known as vice-grips over here. I probably
have about 8 of them.
Anonymous
May 21, 2005 2:56:29 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On Sat, 21 May 2005 06:51:49 -0400, "Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com>
wrote:

>> >There are, but an adjustable wrench would not be the
>proper tool to use.
>
>At times a Mole wrench is the tool of choice for
>badly-rusted nuts. Obviously one starts out with the neat,
>clean tools like ring-end and open-end non-adjustable
>wrenches. But, they do not always get the job done. Oils and
>heating can also loosen rusted nuts, but not always well
>enough.

And sometimes the nut splitter is the only option.

d

Pearce Consulting
http://www.pearce.uk.com
Anonymous
May 27, 2005 5:12:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <H8GdncmlqqzUHBPfRVn-vw@comcast.com>, arnyk@hotpop.com says...
>
>
>
>"Alex Rodriguez" <adr5@columbia.edu> wrote in message
>news:D 6lhhd$pi$8@newsmaster.cc.columbia.edu...
>> In article <KPidna1Jjt6CtRPfRVn-2Q@comcast.com>,
>arnyk@hotpop.com says...
>>
>> >
>> >> Ring spanners and sockets are not an "option", they are
>> >the tools of
>> >> choice. Only the rankest amateur would use an
>adjustable.
>> >
>> >OK, so you want us to believe that there are never any
>> >corroded bolts or bolts with worn exteriors that don't
>work
>> >right with any *standard* spanner or socket.
>>
>> There are, but an adjustable wrench would not be the
>proper tool to use.
>
>Are you perchance limiting adjustable wrenches to what we
>call Crescent wrenches over here?

Yes. Vice grips are not what I would call an adjustable wrench.
Depending on how corroded the nut/bolt is, even vice grips
won't help.

>>I would use a liquid
>> penetrant and a socket that would fit over the corroded
>nut.
>Do you have fractional sized wrenches for nuts that have
>corroded to an in-between size?

Yes.

>> This method has always worked for me.
>Do much exhaust system work?

Not much, but I do one every few years or so. If one of my sockets does not
fit well, I just pull out the dremel tool and cut off the bolt.
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Alex
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