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Rear Speaker Volume Question

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Anonymous
June 1, 2005 2:24:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Hi,

I have a Dolby Digtal receiver hooked up to a Motorola cable box via
digital optical cable. I set the rear speaker volume by ear via a pink
noise generator that is built-in to my receiver. This volume level is
perfect for sources such as pay-per-view programs that are broadcast in
5.1 Dolby Digital. But, for analog TV that is broadcast in Dolby Pro
Logic, you can barely hear anything coming out of the rear speakers.
Is this normal, due to the lower bandwidth of DPL, or do I need to make
a change to the settings of my receiver?
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 1:08:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Mine is a Sony receiver as well. It's very annoying that I don't
really get any surround sound effect for regular TV shows unless I
crank up the rear speaker volume. Then I get blown out of the house if
I forget to turn the rear speaker volume back down when I fire up a
DVD. I find it especially strange considering that the cable box is
connected to the stereo via a digital optical cable -- you'd think this
would do a better job of digital sound processing.
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 1:59:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

<jdmnetcom@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1117646665.307815.306000@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> I have a Dolby Digtal receiver hooked up to a Motorola cable box via
> digital optical cable. I set the rear speaker volume by ear via a pink
> noise generator that is built-in to my receiver. This volume level is
> perfect for sources such as pay-per-view programs that are broadcast in
> 5.1 Dolby Digital. But, for analog TV that is broadcast in Dolby Pro
> Logic, you can barely hear anything coming out of the rear speakers.
> Is this normal, due to the lower bandwidth of DPL, or do I need to make
> a change to the settings of my receiver?

Sounds similar to what I get with my Sony 5.1 AV receiver. 5.1 OK, to out
of this world!; I find Pro Logic effects are subtle in comparison.
I do like the (5.1) underwater explosion effects from depth charges - makes
the sub-woofer worth having.

--
M Stewart
Milton Keynes, UK
http://www.megalith.freeserve.co.uk/oddimage.htm
Related resources
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:09:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In <1117646665.307815.306000@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>, on 06/01/05

at 10:24 AM, jdmnetcom@yahoo.com said:


>Hi,

>I have a Dolby Digtal receiver hooked up to a Motorola cable box via
>digital optical cable. I set the rear speaker volume by ear via a
>pink noise generator that is built-in to my receiver. This volume
>level is perfect for sources such as pay-per-view programs that are
>broadcast in 5.1 Dolby Digital. But, for analog TV that is broadcast
>in Dolby Pro Logic, you can barely hear anything coming out of the
>rear speakers. Is this normal, due to the lower bandwidth of DPL, or
>do I need to make a change to the settings of my receiver?

Program levels vary wildly -- and there may not be any rear channel
information in the original program.

Unfortunately, you'll have to fuss with the receiver for every program.
I know it can be a pain to climb down the menus and change the rears.
Many receivers have memory keys. If yours does, make a few programs
that are similar except for the rear level. Then you can quickly jump
between different setups.

Sometimes some of the surround modes (hall, club, etc.) are more
effective than the Dolby Pro Logic.

I also find that new home theater owners want more aggressive sound out
of the rears. After a while they'll move to more subtile settings. I've
been through this so many times. I'll set a system up, always
forgetting this idea, and the customer will complain that the rear
speakers aren't working. Then I'll set the rears for "slap you in the
back of the head" and the customer thinks it's great. Some months
later if I go back, they have the rears set at a more reasonable level.
We've all been there, but sometimes we forget.


-----------------------------------------------------------
spam: uce@ftc.gov
wordgame:123(abc):<14 9 20 5 2 9 18 4 at 22 15 9 3 5 14 5 20 dot 3 15
13> (Barry Mann)
[sorry about the puzzle, spammers are ruining my mailbox]
-----------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:27:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

What is the NEO6 setting? I am currently using the "Normal Surround"
setting.
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 10:07:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On 2 Jun 2005 09:08:31 -0700, jdmnetcom@yahoo.com wrote:

>Mine is a Sony receiver as well. It's very annoying that I don't
>really get any surround sound effect for regular TV shows unless I
>crank up the rear speaker volume. Then I get blown out of the house if
>I forget to turn the rear speaker volume back down when I fire up a
>DVD. I find it especially strange considering that the cable box is
>connected to the stereo via a digital optical cable -- you'd think this
>would do a better job of digital sound processing.
I use the NEO6 setting for non-5.1 encoded material after deciding the
A.F.D. "Auto" setting did not produce the desired surround effect.

, _
, | \ MKA: Steve Urbach
, | )erek No JUNK in my email please
, ____|_/ragonsclaw dragonsclawJUNK@JUNKmindspring.com
, / / / Running United Devices "Cure For Cancer" Project 24/7 Have you helped? http://www.grid.org
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 11:50:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

On 2 Jun 2005 11:27:12 -0700, jdmnetcom@yahoo.com wrote:

>What is the NEO6 setting? I am currently using the "Normal Surround"
>setting.
Its a DSP mode on my Sony 6.1 Receiver DTS mode package. IMHO it
performs better than the Earlier Dolby Digital DSP effects
(Hall,Jazz,Cinema...) Your Surround features will vary by Brand and
Model (and Vintage <G>. Years...sss ago, I fed my Laserdisk into my
KSQ20 quad decoder when Dolby was only noise reduction.)
, _
, | \ MKA: Steve Urbach
, | )erek No JUNK in my email please
, ____|_/ragonsclaw dragonsclawJUNK@JUNKmindspring.com
, / / / Running United Devices "Cure For Cancer" Project 24/7 Have you helped? http://www.grid.org
June 3, 2005 12:48:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <1117646665.307815.306000@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
jdmnetcom@yahoo.com wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I have a Dolby Digtal receiver hooked up to a Motorola cable box via
> digital optical cable. I set the rear speaker volume by ear via a pink
> noise generator that is built-in to my receiver. This volume level is
> perfect for sources such as pay-per-view programs that are broadcast in
> 5.1 Dolby Digital. But, for analog TV that is broadcast in Dolby Pro
> Logic, you can barely hear anything coming out of the rear speakers.
> Is this normal, due to the lower bandwidth of DPL, or do I need to make
> a change to the settings of my receiver?
>

Pro Logic is making surround from the mains. Chances are there's nothing
going on, when you listened, at the furthest pan extremes left and right
of the stereo signal.

If one wants surround all the time, one can hook up 2 stereo pairs and
place them at both ends of the room.

--
Cyrus

*coughcasaucedoprodigynetcough*
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 1:44:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In <invalid-D8E7CC.01490603062005@newsclstr01.news.prodigy.com>, on
06/03/05
at 08:48 AM, Cyrus <invalid@i.like.spam> said:

[ ... ]

>If one wants surround all the time, one can hook up 2 stereo pairs and
> place them at both ends of the room.

In most situations this is a bit inconvenient because you'll need a
means of switching that extra set of "stereo" speakers. This will
entail either connecting the extra set of speakers to the main (front)
output through an ON/OFF switch or switching the rear surround speakers
from the normal surround output to the main output.

Some 5.1 processors have a multi-speaker "stereo" mode for the analog
inputs. (4,5,6,7,8 ... speakers, depending on the model) This is much
more convenient because many units will recall the last surround mode
associated with a given input. Multi-speaker "stereo" may be
appropriate for stereo CDs, records, or tuner, but not for DVD or DTV
(Digital TV).

-----------------------------------------------------------
spam: uce@ftc.gov
wordgame:123(abc):<14 9 20 5 2 9 18 4 at 22 15 9 3 5 14 5 20 dot 3 15
13> (Barry Mann)
[sorry about the puzzle, spammers are ruining my mailbox]
-----------------------------------------------------------
June 4, 2005 4:41:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <42a063b8$1$avgroveq$mr2ice@wcnews.cyberonic.com>,
zzzz@zzzz.zzz (Barry Mann) wrote:

> In <invalid-D8E7CC.01490603062005@newsclstr01.news.prodigy.com>, on
> 06/03/05
> at 08:48 AM, Cyrus <invalid@i.like.spam> said:
>
> [ ... ]
>
> >If one wants surround all the time, one can hook up 2 stereo pairs and
> > place them at both ends of the room.
>
> In most situations this is a bit inconvenient because you'll need a
> means of switching that extra set of "stereo" speakers. This will
> entail either connecting the extra set of speakers to the main (front)
> output through an ON/OFF switch or switching the rear surround speakers
> from the normal surround output to the main output.
>
> Some 5.1 processors have a multi-speaker "stereo" mode for the analog
> inputs. (4,5,6,7,8 ... speakers, depending on the model) This is much
> more convenient because many units will recall the last surround mode
> associated with a given input. Multi-speaker "stereo" may be
> appropriate for stereo CDs, records, or tuner, but not for DVD or DTV
> (Digital TV).
>

Well I was being facetious. And realized that after send was hit, that
surround should've been 'surround'.

Believe it or not, there are some in the world that believe surround
means sound coming from all speakers at all times.

I concur that when discrete surround channels are available, one should
use them. If not stick with simple stereo.

hth,

--
Cyrus

*coughcasaucedoprodigynetcough*
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 5:38:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In <invalid-A3855F.17415403062005@newsclstr01.news.prodigy.com>, on
06/04/05
at 12:41 AM, Cyrus <invalid@i.like.spam> said:


[ ... ]

>Well I was being facetious. And realized that after send was hit, that
> surround should've been 'surround'.

>Believe it or not, there are some in the world that believe surround
>means sound coming from all speakers at all times.

I believe, but I would say "lots of people" not "some".

I was never able to stop the grumbling about not being able to provide
"stereo all around". Customers thought that their equipment was
defective because it was so obvious (to them) that things should work
that way. "Why should the rear speakers be silent, isn't this a
surround unit?"

Finally, the manufacturers listened and provided the additional
surround mode.

>I concur that when discrete surround channels are available, one
>should use them. If not stick with simple stereo.

Rather then 5.1, some people use one of the hall processing modes
because the rear speakers are more likely to be active all the time.

-----------------------------------------------------------
spam: uce@ftc.gov
wordgame:123(abc):<14 9 20 5 2 9 18 4 at 22 15 9 3 5 14 5 20 dot 3 15
13> (Barry Mann)
[sorry about the puzzle, spammers are ruining my mailbox]
-----------------------------------------------------------
June 4, 2005 10:16:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

In article <42a14101$1$avgroveq$mr2ice@wcnews.cyberonic.com>,
zzzz@zzzz.zzz (Barry Mann) wrote:

> In <invalid-A3855F.17415403062005@newsclstr01.news.prodigy.com>, on
> 06/04/05
> at 12:41 AM, Cyrus <invalid@i.like.spam> said:
>
>
> [ ... ]
>
> >Well I was being facetious. And realized that after send was hit, that
> > surround should've been 'surround'.
>
> >Believe it or not, there are some in the world that believe surround
> >means sound coming from all speakers at all times.
>
> I believe, but I would say "lots of people" not "some".
>

hehe Agreed.

> I was never able to stop the grumbling about not being able to provide
> "stereo all around". Customers thought that their equipment was
> defective because it was so obvious (to them) that things should work
> that way. "Why should the rear speakers be silent, isn't this a
> surround unit?"
>
> Finally, the manufacturers listened and provided the additional
> surround mode.
>
> >I concur that when discrete surround channels are available, one
> >should use them. If not stick with simple stereo.
>
> Rather then 5.1, some people use one of the hall processing modes
> because the rear speakers are more likely to be active all the time.
>

ugh. Gimme stereo.

> -----------------------------------------------------------
> spam: uce@ftc.gov
> wordgame:123(abc):<14 9 20 5 2 9 18 4 at 22 15 9 3 5 14 5 20 dot 3 15
> 13> (Barry Mann)
> [sorry about the puzzle, spammers are ruining my mailbox]
> -----------------------------------------------------------
>

--
Cyrus

*coughcasaucedoprodigynetcough*
!