Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Proper way to solder splice {was: What size speaker wire f..

Last response: in Home Audio
Share
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 10:48:17 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

Thanks all for the responses to my original question on the above named
subject. Looks like a trip to the local depot is in order for some
new wire.

Anyway, I saw several responses talking about "properly soldered"
splices. Which, for me, begs the question what is a properly soldered
joint and how do you do it? Once again, thanks for all the input.
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 12:25:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

glw82664 wrote ...
> Thanks all for the responses to my original question on the above
> named
> subject. Looks like a trip to the local depot is in order for some
> new wire.
>
> Anyway, I saw several responses talking about "properly soldered"
> splices. Which, for me, begs the question what is a properly soldered
> joint and how do you do it? Once again, thanks for all the input.

When I splice "zip-cord", I cut the two wires offset from each other
about 1.5 or 2 inches. Then I slip heat shrink tubing over the longer
wire and strip the insulation ~1/2 inch. Then I just overlap the bare
wire ends and solder them together, shrinking the tubing over the
joints to insulate them. If I were splicing wire for mains power,
I would put another heat shrink tubing over both of the joints for
extra protection.

If you are asking specifically about how to solder, there are several
tutorials online, likely illustrated even.
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 1:41:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

glw82664 wrote:


> Anyway, I saw several responses talking about "properly soldered"
> splices. Which, for me, begs the question what is a properly soldered
> joint and how do you do it? Once again, thanks for all the input.

Actually pretty easy.

Slide on 3 or 4 inches of shrink wrap. Then just overlap each wire end 2
inches or so and wind the end of each wire around the opposing wire.
Heat the joint with your soldering iron and melt in a bit of solder (not
too much or it just makes a big lump). The slide the shrink wrap over
the finished splice and heat it until it shrinks around the splice. You
can also just wrap it with electrical tape instead of shrink wrap, but
it doesn't look as good and may start to unwind in a couple of years.
Related resources
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 1:55:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

glw82664 wrote:
> Thanks all for the responses to my original question on
the above
> named subject. Looks like a trip to the local depot is
in order
> for some new wire.
>
> Anyway, I saw several responses talking about "properly
soldered"
> splices. Which, for me, begs the question what is a
properly soldered
> joint and how do you do it? Once again, thanks for all
the input.

Try googling "how to solder". Lots of good stuff.
June 7, 2005 3:19:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

> Anyway, I saw several responses talking about "properly soldered"
> splices. Which, for me, begs the question what is a properly soldered
> joint and how do you do it? Once again, thanks for all the input.

It's one where the solder wets and adheres to the metal, as opposed to just
sticking to its surface.

If the solder looks like a water drop on a waxed car -- with very sharp
boundaries as if the metal were repelling it -- then either it wasn't heated
adequately or the copper wire wasn't clean. The solder should flow freely
onto the metal and start to become alloyed with it.
Anonymous
June 7, 2005 7:40:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

Richard Crowley wrote:
> glw82664 wrote ...
>> Thanks all for the responses to my original question on the above
>> named
>> subject. Looks like a trip to the local depot is in order for
>> some new wire.
>>
>> Anyway, I saw several responses talking about "properly soldered"
>> splices. Which, for me, begs the question what is a properly
>> soldered joint and how do you do it? Once again, thanks for all the
>> input.
>
> When I splice "zip-cord", I cut the two wires offset from each other
> about 1.5 or 2 inches.
> Then I slip heat shrink tubing over the longer
> wire and strip the insulation ~1/2 inch. Then I just overlap the bare
> wire ends and solder them together,

...and I bet that it works just fine for you; but to me, not twisting the
wires together in some fashion prior to soldering seems completely
counterintuitive. I don't even think I could make my fingers do it<g>.
Usually, I simply twist the two ends together and bend them back over inline
with the conductor, but if I have smaller than optimum shrink wrap
available, that makes a lump which is hard to slide over. In those cases, I
twist each loose end separately--in line--over the other...sort of a
modified 'linemans splice.'

> shrinking the tubing over the
> joints to insulate them. If I were splicing wire for mains power,
> I would put another heat shrink tubing over both of the joints for
> extra protection.
>
I do this in almost all cases, unless I don't have the proper size shrink in
the drawer.

> If you are asking specifically about how to solder, there are several
> tutorials online, likely illustrated even.

OTOH, for the OP's purposes, there are any number of solderless solutions
available. Wire nuts work well, even if they're ugly...use the proper size.
Tape or shrink them for security...also covers up the ugly garish colors.
Crimp type butt connectors require almost as much care (and equipment) as
making a solder joint, and I don't recommend them, but they work if you have
the proper crimper and know how to prepare the conductors and use the
crimper. Tape or shrink without solder can do the job, too; but mechanical
strength, moisture resistance is an issue.

jak
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 12:50:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

> > When I splice "zip-cord", I cut the two wires offset from each other
> > about 1.5 or 2 inches.
> > Then I slip heat shrink tubing over the longer
> > wire and strip the insulation ~1/2 inch. Then I just overlap the bare
> > wire ends and solder them together,
>
> ..and I bet that it works just fine for you; but to me, not twisting the
> wires together in some fashion prior to soldering seems completely
> counterintuitive. I don't even think I could make my fingers do it<g>.
> Usually, I simply twist the two ends together and bend them back over
inline
> with the conductor, but if I have smaller than optimum shrink wrap
> available, that makes a lump which is hard to slide over. In those cases,
I
> twist each loose end separately--in line--over the other...sort of a
> modified 'linemans splice.'

I do the same two things. The twist is important, since the solder is NOT
supposed to provide the mechanical strength of the connection...it is there
to secure the electrical connection. Or so I've been told.

-John O
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 12:50:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

"John O" wrote ...
> > > When I splice "zip-cord", I cut the two wires offset from each other
> > > about 1.5 or 2 inches.
> > > Then I slip heat shrink tubing over the longer
> > > wire and strip the insulation ~1/2 inch. Then I just overlap the bare
> > > wire ends and solder them together,
> >
> > ..and I bet that it works just fine for you; but to me, not twisting the
> > wires together in some fashion prior to soldering seems completely
> > counterintuitive. I don't even think I could make my fingers do it<g>.
> > Usually, I simply twist the two ends together and bend them back over
> inline
> > with the conductor, but if I have smaller than optimum shrink wrap
> > available, that makes a lump which is hard to slide over. In those
cases,
> I
> > twist each loose end separately--in line--over the other...sort of a
> > modified 'linemans splice.'
>
> I do the same two things. The twist is important, since the solder is NOT
> supposed to provide the mechanical strength of the connection...it is
there
> to secure the electrical connection. Or so I've been told.

I would agree completely if we were splicing solid wire. But my experience
is that by mashing the strands together and soldering, the joint is actually
stronger than the original wire. My theory is because of the enormous
surface area of all those strands (x2) for the solder to bond with.
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 11:17:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

Scott Dorsey wrote:

> That's what the remote truck is for.
>
> But I can say that when you drive off in the remote truck without
> disconnecting lines, the cable breaks before the XLR connector does.
> Don't ask me how I know this.

How do you know this?

And where's the mixing console that was right here a couple
of minutes ago?
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 5:06:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

> >
> > I do the same two things. The twist is important, since the solder is
NOT
> > supposed to provide the mechanical strength of the connection...it is
> there
> > to secure the electrical connection. Or so I've been told.
>
> I would agree completely if we were splicing solid wire. But my experience
> is that by mashing the strands together and soldering, the joint is
actually
> stronger than the original wire. My theory is because of the enormous
> surface area of all those strands (x2) for the solder to bond with.

Not sure I'd say stronger than the wire itself, (I used to have access to a
tool to test this) but otherwise that logic makes sense to me. I've done a
few splices that way...push the ends of stranded into each other, squeeze
them closed, solder, squeeze it smooth, and wrap it.

-John O
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 5:06:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

"John O" <johno@!noSPAM!heathkit.com> wrote in message
news:k3Cpe.3395$_A5.1816@newssvr19.news.prodigy.com...
>> >
>> > I do the same two things. The twist is important, since the solder
>> > is
> NOT
>> > supposed to provide the mechanical strength of the connection...it
>> > is
>> there
>> > to secure the electrical connection. Or so I've been told.
>>
>> I would agree completely if we were splicing solid wire. But my
>> experience
>> is that by mashing the strands together and soldering, the joint is
> actually
>> stronger than the original wire. My theory is because of the enormous
>> surface area of all those strands (x2) for the solder to bond with.
>
> Not sure I'd say stronger than the wire itself, (I used to have access
> to a
> tool to test this) but otherwise that logic makes sense to me. I've
> done a
> few splices that way...push the ends of stranded into each other,
> squeeze
> them closed, solder, squeeze it smooth, and wrap it.

I've actually tested it by trying to pull the joint apart, physically.
The wire always breaks and I've never been able to separate the
joint. No special equipment needed. Just a strong arm and maybe
a little lever-action.
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 5:53:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

> I've actually tested it by trying to pull the joint apart, physically.
> The wire always breaks and I've never been able to separate the
> joint. No special equipment needed. Just a strong arm and maybe
> a little lever-action.

I was thinking bigger wire...pulling apart 14/16 gauge isn't so easy on the
hands.

-John O
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 5:53:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

John O <johno@!noSPAM!heathkit.com> wrote:
>> I've actually tested it by trying to pull the joint apart, physically.
>> The wire always breaks and I've never been able to separate the
>> joint. No special equipment needed. Just a strong arm and maybe
>> a little lever-action.
>
>I was thinking bigger wire...pulling apart 14/16 gauge isn't so easy on the
>hands.

That's what the remote truck is for.

But I can say that when you drive off in the remote truck without
disconnecting lines, the cable breaks before the XLR connector does.
Don't ask me how I know this.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
June 8, 2005 6:34:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.misc,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion (More info?)

> But I can say that when you drive off in the remote truck without
> disconnecting lines, the cable breaks before the XLR connector does.
> Don't ask me how I know this.

I recall testing the line cord strain relief for an echo/reverb unit once.
The van door held the cord quite well, and the strain relief passed.

-John O
!