Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

New copy of windows necessary?

Last response: in Windows 7
Share
a b $ Windows 7
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 12, 2012 4:20:29 PM

I've upgraded my CPU in the past on my PC and not needed to install a new copy of Windows 7. I am considering updating both my motherboard and CPU on this same machine. I would be changing to a newer platform/architecture.

Will I need to do a fresh install of Windows or will the PC function with the new parts?

Does anyone know what criteria might dictate a new copy of windows be used?

More about : copy windows

a c 228 $ Windows 7
a b V Motherboard
April 12, 2012 4:37:45 PM

If you are currently running with an OEM version of windows, the new motherboard will require a new windows license. If it's a retail copy, then you can reuse it.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 12, 2012 4:55:46 PM

Since you are upgrading BOTH the CPU and motherboard, a fresh install would be best: too many changes.

And what Hawkeye said!

Thanks for asking before hand, as so many ask after they already do it, and wonder why it won't activate/work/etc.
m
0
l
Related resources
April 12, 2012 5:00:31 PM

If it's OEM, I've heard folks say that a call to Microsoft explaining that you (the licensed user) are changing your mobo, and they will give you a new key.

m
0
l
April 12, 2012 5:08:30 PM

i have done that more then once, and never needed a new copy of windows...
but the automated process to authciated didnt work , i had to use the phone system

but i get my windows thru my college
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
a c 79 à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 12, 2012 5:16:24 PM

there is a method when it detects the issue during installation, follow it and you may or may not be ok. I can't imagine that they don't offer you the cchnace to purchase at that point.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 12, 2012 5:38:24 PM

If the OEM installation has been installed on another system, it grabs the serial number of the motherboard and when you activate, it then ties that license to that motherboard.
If you get a new motherboard, the OEM version will install, but the problem will start when you go to activate, as the OEM license will show that copy of Windows is tied to another computer, this is where you need to call Microsoft and explain you are upgrading your current build, and be sure you specify to them "the upgrade was due to a faulty motherboard/parts that needed to be replaced"
A little white lie maybe, but that condition will justify immediately the need for the new motherboard, and they will give you a new activation code to get the OS up and running again.
m
0
l
April 12, 2012 5:41:09 PM

Hey, if I can't play BF3 on my old motherboard, it's not a lie, that thing is FAULTY! :) 
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
a b à CPUs
April 12, 2012 5:51:14 PM

you can do the straight swap quite simply

1.backup all data you want to keep
2. remove all chipset drivers
3. reboot and make sure it is using the generic drivers that come with windows
4. swap out the hardware

5. after you have turned it on, it is most likely that windows wont be able to detect if you have added more ram/more cores

6. simplist fix is to download and install http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/

i did this myself and it worked fine

7. open program. click on advanced

8. cange cpu count to 0 that will reset the amount and set it to default
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 12, 2012 6:46:45 PM

shanky887614 said:
you can do the straight swap quite simply

1.backup all data you want to keep
2. remove all chipset drivers
3. reboot and make sure it is using the generic drivers that come with windows
4. swap out the hardware

5. after you have turned it on, it is most likely that windows wont be able to detect if you have added more ram/more cores

6. simplist fix is to download and install http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/

i did this myself and it worked fine

7. open program. click on advanced

8. cange cpu count to 0 that will reset the amount and set it to default

What is the easiest way to remove the chipset drivers? How do you go about it?
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
a b à CPUs
a b V Motherboard
April 14, 2012 9:47:28 AM

The reason I ask about removing the various drivers for chipset controllers specific to my old platform is won't I start taking away core functionality when you're doing this and eventually not be able to operate the PC within windows?

I guess what I'm looking for is the order to doing so? Or am I overthinking this?

Will merely replacing the board and processor force windows to boot up with generic drivers for the new motherboard?
m
0
l
!