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Question on speaker selectors

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  • Speakers
  • Audio
  • Connection
Last response: in Home Audio
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Anonymous
August 6, 2005 8:45:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

My plans are to connect a speaker selector to my Yamaha receiver in the
Family Room. Supposedly this will send the audio to the speakers
through out my house. When this connection is done or turned on, does
the 6.1 speaker system for the family room cut out? Do I need to
connect the family room speakers to the selector in order for them to
work or will they stay a separate system just connected to the
receiver?

I hope this makes sense. I am just trying to figure out how all this
works. We had our new house wired for this, but wanted to DIY to save
money. Mesa wanted over $10K to do our media room alone. That may not
sound like much to some of you, but it is more than I can afford or
justify.

Thanks for your help.

More about : question speaker selectors

Anonymous
August 8, 2005 8:56:19 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

<adagioblue@austin.rr.com> wrote in message
news:1123371916.146728.79710@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> My plans are to connect a speaker selector to my Yamaha receiver in the
> Family Room. Supposedly this will send the audio to the speakers
> through out my house. When this connection is done or turned on, does
> the 6.1 speaker system for the family room cut out? Do I need to
> connect the family room speakers to the selector in order for them to
> work or will they stay a separate system just connected to the
> receiver?
>
> I hope this makes sense. I am just trying to figure out how all this
> works. We had our new house wired for this, but wanted to DIY to save
> money. Mesa wanted over $10K to do our media room alone. That may not
> sound like much to some of you, but it is more than I can afford or
> justify.
>
> Thanks for your help.
>
I have a Yamaha RX-V757. I use speaker A for video and surround sound. I
have a speaker selector connected to speaker B for stereo. I have speakers
with volume control in three rooms connected to the speaker selector. It
works great. I use "Pure Direct" when I'm listening to stereo and select
speakers A and B. Wired it all when I built my house with Vampire 14 gauge
speaker wire. The setup test on my Yamaha takes care of speaker balance for
the video and surround sound.

Good luck
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 9:58:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech (More info?)

<adagioblue@austin.rr.com> wrote in message
news:1123371916.146728.79710@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

> Mesa wanted over $10K to do our media room alone. That may not
> sound like much to some of you ...

It's a *huge* amount to me ...

We just had a thread on this, titled "Volume control at the speakers?". It
also split off a thread on Wireless audio transmission.

I think you have to sit down and write down your requirements.

Are you distributing video as well as sound?

For each room, do you want 5.1 sound, stereo sound, or what?

What control do you want for each room - volume, selection of material, or
what? Does the contol need to be from the room, or from a central point?

Do you want sound in only one room at a time, in the HT room plus one other
room, or what?

Once you've got your functional requirements clear, you can assess your
quality requirements.

And then you can assess the likely costs.

You can do it by installing in each room its own amplifier and speakers,
plus cable. Depending on the number of rooms you're connecting, you might
want to install some kind of central driver (think of it as a booster) for
the cables.

Some stereo amplifiers have extra sets of speakers terminals, so you could
cut down on the number of amplifiers. Of course, you can always drive extra
speakers anyway, provided you know how to wire them up to avoid damaging
your amplifier. Connecting two speakers in series doubles the impedance,
connecting in parallel halves the impedance, so by judicious mixing of
series and parallel, you can connect as many speakers as you want.

However, the available amplifier power will be split between the speakers,
and some power will be wasted in the connecting leads ... the longer the
leads, the more power gets wasted.

One advantage of amplifier-per-room is the amplifier and speakers can then
be used for local sources (within the room) as well as the central source.

It's also possible to design the system so there are two central sources
available at once, with each room individually switching betwen them - it
just takes more wires.

Tim
!