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NASA TV video quality

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Anonymous
July 22, 2005 11:15:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.satellite.tvro,alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb,sci.space.shuttle (More info?)

Anyone else think the video resolution of NASA-TV has degraded since the
digital switchover? In particular some of the recorded video file material
looks atrocious, but even live events look less than optimal. I'm
interested mainly in the opinions of those who viewed the analog c-band
feeds of several years ago, not current small dish viewers.

Cole Smith

More about : nasa video quality

Anonymous
July 23, 2005 9:13:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.satellite.tvro,alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb,sci.space.shuttle (More info?)

i think it has also.
"cole smith" <lcs1h@adelphia.net> wrote in message
news:EsCdnbUPO5Nn4HzfRVn-ug@adelphia.com...
> Anyone else think the video resolution of NASA-TV has degraded since the
> digital switchover? In particular some of the recorded video file
> material looks atrocious, but even live events look less than optimal.
> I'm interested mainly in the opinions of those who viewed the analog
> c-band feeds of several years ago, not current small dish viewers.
>
> Cole Smith
>
>
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 3:30:28 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.satellite.tvro,alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb,sci.space.shuttle (More info?)

Why would anyone think that quality would be the same or better when the
signal undergoes a digital transformation?


"Bob Sorrentino" <bob.tino@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:iVuEe.1290$9y3.887@trnddc06...
>i think it has also.
> "cole smith" <lcs1h@adelphia.net> wrote in message
> news:EsCdnbUPO5Nn4HzfRVn-ug@adelphia.com...
>> Anyone else think the video resolution of NASA-TV has degraded since the
>> digital switchover? In particular some of the recorded video file
>> material looks atrocious, but even live events look less than optimal.
>> I'm interested mainly in the opinions of those who viewed the analog
>> c-band feeds of several years ago, not current small dish viewers.
>>
>> Cole Smith
>>
>>
>
>
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Anonymous
August 1, 2005 3:48:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.satellite.tvro,alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb,sci.space.shuttle (More info?)

cole smith wrote:
> Anyone else think the video resolution of NASA-TV has degraded since the
> digital switchover? In particular some of the recorded video file material
> looks atrocious, but even live events look less than optimal. I'm
> interested mainly in the opinions of those who viewed the analog c-band
> feeds of several years ago, not current small dish viewers.

One factor that might add to the impression
of reduced quality was the lousy long-range
tracking camera focus. Nearly every long-
range shot I saw was out of focus much of
the time. It appeared that these might have
been autofocus systems that were fooled by the
bright plumes. These out of focus shots were
useless for determining ET shedding events as
near as I could tell. I would like to know
what went wrong with these cameras.

- Ed Kyle
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 4:03:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.satellite.tvro,alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb,sci.space.shuttle (More info?)

ed kyle wrote:
> cole smith wrote:
> > Anyone else think the video resolution of NASA-TV has degraded since the
> > digital switchover? In particular some of the recorded video file material
> > looks atrocious, but even live events look less than optimal. I'm
> > interested mainly in the opinions of those who viewed the analog c-band
> > feeds of several years ago, not current small dish viewers.
>
> One factor that might add to the impression
> of reduced quality was the lousy long-range
> tracking camera focus. Nearly every long-
> range shot I saw was out of focus much of
> the time. It appeared that these might have
> been autofocus systems that were fooled by the
> bright plumes. These out of focus shots were
> useless for determining ET shedding events as
> near as I could tell. I would like to know
> what went wrong with these cameras.

They really should be operating cameras manually whenever possible. I
don't mean letting just anybody do it but somebody trained and
experienced... perhaps with some auto assistance on launch tracking of
course. Train just like you train for complicated missions. An
experienced camera operator makes a world of difference in the world of
filming live events... they know that in the entertainment world. You
don't have auto focus problems or auto iris issues (seen on ISS
exterior footage all the time.) It seems like NASA treats cameras like
a black box. You stick a bunch of equipment together and hook it all up
to a single button somebody presses. That might work if you were
filming the exact same events under the exact same lighting conditions
all the time but once you introduce camera movement you definitely need
a live camera operator or short of that a video production director
with a clue and some manual override on the camera functions.

-McDaniel



>
> - Ed Kyle
Anonymous
August 1, 2005 7:06:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.video.satellite.tvro,alt.video.satellite.mpeg-dvb,sci.space.shuttle (More info?)

SHb wrote:
>
> Why would anyone think that quality would be the same or better when the
> signal undergoes a digital transformation?

Digital trasnmission imvolves compression of signal. (In this case I think
MPEG-2). When you compress a signal, you specify compression quality which
will allow yo to feed the signla through a specificed amount of bandwidth. The
more compressed the signal is, the worse the image quality.
!