Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Home Server setup

Last response: in Windows 7
Share
April 16, 2012 3:54:44 AM

I have an 8 core, 16GB ram, 3 network card system with WIN 7 ultimate that will be used as a home server/HTPC. One network connection is to the Internet, one is to a DROBO FS storage device, and one is to the home network. The goal is to be a file/print/media (PS3 & PCs)/ and internet access server with the ability to control bandwidth utilization as well as file and print access rights. The system is running and has connectivity to the DROBO FS. An recommendations on where to go from here?

More about : home server setup

a b $ Windows 7
April 16, 2012 4:07:41 AM

30 people in your household?
m
0
l
April 16, 2012 12:26:05 PM

We have multiple computers, iTouches, and Game Systems. Also going to use to rnder 2d to 3d 1080p movies. may use setup a VPN to family elsewere.
m
0
l
Related resources
April 16, 2012 12:27:16 PM

and don;t forget 3d movie playback.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
April 16, 2012 12:40:22 PM

ArmySithLord said:
and don;t forget 3d movie playback.
3D movie playback is nothing special. Most of the decode is done on the video card these days. CPU workload remains very low.
A fast dual core CPU or an AMD APU would have been plenty for that type of workload.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
April 16, 2012 12:58:14 PM

I thing that the OS is more important, look up windows home server and see if that'll meet your needs. It'll leave your big machine free for gaming, and the upgrades to the big machine will be simpler.
m
0
l
April 16, 2012 11:22:32 PM

my 2d to 3d rendering software will not work on LINIX or WHS. Is there a way to add the server functionality to W7U?
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
April 16, 2012 11:25:16 PM

Now you're building a home workstation and not a home server?
m
0
l
April 17, 2012 12:42:00 AM

one system that does both.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
April 17, 2012 12:53:58 AM

You're building a home workstation - it's far and away your most demanding application. And that explains the 8 core CPU.

You're going to use your home workstation to do extra duty as a HTPC and home server.
m
0
l
April 17, 2012 1:15:21 AM

That is what I stated. So I ask again, is there a way to add the server functionality to W7U?
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
April 17, 2012 1:20:24 AM

Yes
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
April 17, 2012 1:27:06 AM

Running a server application with the features you need.
Something similar to XAMPP for Windows which might be more then you need.

Media Portal looks interesting and would cover the HTPC type fuctions but it's probably not the only application you'd need.
m
0
l
April 17, 2012 1:35:59 AM

I will try those when I get home tonight. Thanks.
m
0
l
a b $ Windows 7
April 17, 2012 2:15:07 AM

Look over Media Portal first.

XAMPP for Windows is fairly complex and you may not need the MySQL database and PHP scripting included in the whole package. I've been using it for a couple years but I need MySQL/PHP for content management systems (CMS) applications like Gallery

Apache for Windows might be all you need. And I'll look over some of the light weight server applications to see what's out there.
m
0
l
April 17, 2012 5:09:59 AM

ArmySithLord said:
I have an 8 core, 16GB ram, 3 network card system with WIN 7 ultimate that will be used as a home server/HTPC. One network connection is to the Internet, one is to a DROBO FS storage device, and one is to the home network. The goal is to be a file/print/media (PS3 & PCs)/ and internet access server with the ability to control bandwidth utilization as well as file and print access rights. The system is running and has connectivity to the DROBO FS. An recommendations on where to go from here?


Ok as someone who runs their own home AD / File server and CentOS Router, your going to need two different computers to do what your wanting to do, at least to do it securely.

Your first machine needs to be running a stripped down Linux / Unix OS (I used a customized CentOS distro) and have two network ports. First will be connected to your ISP / external internet, second will be to your local LAN. This box will be running iptables with Squid IDS and other security related packages. It's your router / network gateway device. Your running this because it presents the least possible points for an outside attacker to get through or to hijack the system.

Your second box will be the actual home server running Windows Server or some version of Linux / Unix (depending on how you swing). Above people mentioned various software to install, it's up to you. Things like SQL database's and web front ends present points for an attacker to hijack, and you don't have a security department to ensure it's secured nor are you a security expert (you won't be asking about this if you were). The likely hood of you securing your NT Server running those services against an outside attack is low, especially as "out of the box" NT Server is horribly insecure.

My router is a mini-itx box with a Via C7 and 1GB of memory. It has a jetway daughter card on it that gives it four total Ethernet ports, I'm only using two of those. It's running CentOS that I've customized. My home server is a Mini-itx box with a Via Nano x2 and 4GB of memory running Windows 2003 server Enterprise (get it for free from work MSDN), it has an eSATA connection to a four port media-sonic enclosure with 4GB of total disk space. This server is running AD, DNS and various shared from the Disk Array. I have ten PC's at my home with various functions on each of them along with a WDTV Live, 360 and PS3.
m
0
l
April 17, 2012 1:56:56 PM

Bascly I want to runn a Proxy server, a file server (that can share NAS access), as well as a media servver (that supports both PS3 and X-Box 360) on a workstation.
m
0
l
a c 371 $ Windows 7
April 17, 2012 2:48:34 PM

Non-server OS will have connection limits, you don't want to be running all that one one system that you will be using for work on anyway.

A NAS box will have remote access rights you can setup, some also have media server built-in. You'd just need to setup a Proxy but a cheap Linux box running on a P4 system with 4 gig of RAM can do that easily.
m
0
l
April 18, 2012 1:26:56 AM

ArmySithLord said:
Bascly I want to runn a Proxy server, a file server (that can share NAS access), as well as a media servver (that supports both PS3 and X-Box 360) on a workstation.



Proxy / File / Media can all be run on a single box that doesn't need to be directly connected to the WAN / Internet.

I would highly recommend not connecting a windows server, running those services, directly to the internet, no good will come of it. Your firewall / network gateway device needs to be running as few services as possible and be as locked down as you can get it.
m
0
l
April 28, 2012 2:13:31 AM

if i use a firewall device between the Home server/htpc and the internet, how do I make this system work withh all other compters having togo through the server to get internet access so that I can control the amount of bandwidth that each system has access to?
m
0
l
a c 371 $ Windows 7
April 30, 2012 7:34:26 PM

ArmySithLord said:
if i use a firewall device between the Home server/htpc and the internet, how do I make this system work withh all other compters having togo through the server to get internet access so that I can control the amount of bandwidth that each system has access to?


You don't have to do anything, if the proxy server you are running has access to the internet, so will the other computers connected to that proxy server. You don't need a hole in the firewall for the other computers, only the proxy server is connecting to the firewall. Makes for a safer setup also as any attacks that directly target a PC should only be able to try to attack the proxy server and not the other computers. As long as security was setup properly on it.
m
0
l
May 1, 2012 1:44:23 AM

ArmySithLord said:
if i use a firewall device between the Home server/htpc and the internet, how do I make this system work withh all other compters having togo through the server to get internet access so that I can control the amount of bandwidth that each system has access to?



Ok stop we need to clarify a few terms first. When you say "proxy" are you just referring to a NAT gateway device or a full blown web proxy? Those are two very different things.

SOHO "routers" are just NAT routers, they just modify headers on packets and translate IP address for local traffic outbound to the internet. All local traffic can be routed to the internet easily, this includes web traffic. Web Proxy's on the other hand don't touch packets and instead act as a middle man for web traffic. Your browser must be configured to use the proxy, your browser makes the web request to the proxy, the proxy then makes the web request to the webpage and cache's the result for later use. Web Proxy's are much harder to setup then SOHO NAT routers. Absolutely no home SOHO router does web proxying, they just do NAT translate with connection tracking and SPI. The little dlinks / belkins / linksys routers you buy for $100 only have ~32MB of flash memory, that's enough for a configuration and a bunch of small binary's but not the 8GB+ needed for a web cache.

A web proxy can easily be setup either on an interior device (home server) or on a full blown linux server / router. Squid is a good proxy software. You absolutely can not setup a web proxy on those small store-bought "routers".

So please sit down and make sure your using the right definitions so we can all speak the same language and get on the same page.
m
0
l
!