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Extend wireless by adding extra router via ethernet wall port

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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June 15, 2012 9:41:56 PM

I have a very..newbie-type question,but id be glad if someone can help.
My dorms have wifi in the common room, and ethernet wall ports in the rooms since wifi doesnt reach that far. They both have the same network name (e.g. the wifi network is named 'apple', and when i connect through ethernet in my room the name is also 'apple')
I need to have wifi in my room. So, if i get a router and connect it to the ethernet port in my room's wall, would that work? Is that all you have to do or is there some other stuff i should know about?also can i put a password on it? And also, will it carry the network traffic of the common room?(if two people are using the common room's wifi, will the wifi speed in my room be affected nd whatnot) i have a linksys router lying around at home (the blue one with the double antennas, everyones seen them, and the one in the common room is the same...wireless g) so please tell me if this would work.thanks!

Best solution

June 15, 2012 10:34:27 PM

You can always chain routers, one behind the other, WAN to LAN, and that's effectively what you'd be doing assuming the ethernet connection in your room connects back to the router in the common area. You’d simply run an ethernet cable from your router’s WAN port to the wall. Just make sure to use a DIFFERENT network. For example, if the router in the common area is using 192.168.1.x, perhaps make yours 192.168.2.x. You would establish your own SSID, wireless security, etc., and can access any resources upstream on the router in the common area, or the internet.

The other option is to connect your router to the wall using a LAN port, NOT the WAN. The difference here is that now BOTH routers are in the SAME network (e.g., 192.168.1.x). Your router is demoted to nothing more than a wireless switch. But it’s VERY IMPORTANT in this case to disable your router’s DHCP server so as to not end up w/ two DHCP servers on the same network! You’d also want to give your router a static IP in that network (e.g., 192.168.1.2) that’s NOT part of the DHCP pool. That will give you administrative access to your own router w/ a unique IP. While being on the same network may seem nice, it has the disadvantage of not having a firewall between you and other users in the common area. May or may not be of concern to you, but it’s something you need to decide; do you want your own network, or be part of the other network.

Personally I recommend the first approach, create your own network. It’s simpler, less error prone, and provides protection via the firewall. Of course, whichever method you choose, you'll want to use a different wireless channel to minimize interference.
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June 15, 2012 11:13:27 PM

eibgrad said:
You can always chain routers, one behind the other, WAN to LAN, and that's effectively what you'd be doing assuming the ethernet connection in your room connects back to the router in the common area. You’d simply run an ethernet cable from your router’s WAN port to the wall. Just make sure to use a DIFFERENT network. For example, if the router in the common area is using 192.168.1.x, perhaps make yours 192.168.2.x. You would establish your own SSID, wireless security, etc., and can access any resources upstream on the router in the common area, or the internet.

The other option is to connect your router to the wall using a LAN port, NOT the WAN. The difference here is that now BOTH routers are in the SAME network (e.g., 192.168.1.x). Your router is demoted to nothing more than a wireless switch. But it’s VERY IMPORTANT in this case to disable your router’s DHCP server so as to not end up w/ two DHCP servers on the same network! You’d also want to give your router a static IP in that network (e.g., 192.168.1.2) that’s NOT part of the DHCP pool. That will give you administrative access to your own router w/ a unique IP. While being on the same network may seem nice, it has the disadvantage of not having a firewall between you and other users in the common area. May or may not be of concern to you, but it’s something you need to decide; do you want your own network, or be part of the other network.

Personally I recommend the first approach, create your own network. It’s simpler, less error prone, and provides protection via the firewall. Of course, whichever method you choose, you'll want to use a different wireless channel to minimize interference.


Thank you for the informative answer!
I guess the first option is more hassle free. Umm I'm a bit unsure about this, but you have to change the network by plugging the router to a pc via LAN while the router is connected to the wall by WAN, and going to the router settings? Is that where I can change the network address? Thanks again for the answer!
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June 15, 2012 11:14:07 PM

eibgrad said:
You can always chain routers, one behind the other, WAN to LAN, and that's effectively what you'd be doing assuming the ethernet connection in your room connects back to the router in the common area. You’d simply run an ethernet cable from your router’s WAN port to the wall. Just make sure to use a DIFFERENT network. For example, if the router in the common area is using 192.168.1.x, perhaps make yours 192.168.2.x. You would establish your own SSID, wireless security, etc., and can access any resources upstream on the router in the common area, or the internet.

The other option is to connect your router to the wall using a LAN port, NOT the WAN. The difference here is that now BOTH routers are in the SAME network (e.g., 192.168.1.x). Your router is demoted to nothing more than a wireless switch. But it’s VERY IMPORTANT in this case to disable your router’s DHCP server so as to not end up w/ two DHCP servers on the same network! You’d also want to give your router a static IP in that network (e.g., 192.168.1.2) that’s NOT part of the DHCP pool. That will give you administrative access to your own router w/ a unique IP. While being on the same network may seem nice, it has the disadvantage of not having a firewall between you and other users in the common area. May or may not be of concern to you, but it’s something you need to decide; do you want your own network, or be part of the other network.

Personally I recommend the first approach, create your own network. It’s simpler, less error prone, and provides protection via the firewall. Of course, whichever method you choose, you'll want to use a different wireless channel to minimize interference.


Thank you for the informative answer!
I guess the first option is more hassle free. Umm I'm a bit unsure about this, but you have to change the network by plugging the router to a pc via LAN while the router is connected to the wall by WAN, and going to the router settings? Is that where I can change the network address? Thanks again for the answer!
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June 16, 2012 12:26:23 AM

You don't need to have the router connected to the wall over the WAN to change its network. You just need to connect a PC to the router over a LAN port, access the administrative interface (most likely http://192.168.1.1 ), and find the basic setup section. Obviously I can't tell you exactly since I don't know anything about your router. But somewhere there you'll see the router's IP (192.168.1.1), a netmask (255.255.255.0), etc. Typically if you change the IP of the router to say 192.168.2.1, save and reboot, the router will automatically change the whole router, including the DHCP server, to the same network (192.168.2.x/255.255.255.0). It's pretty simple.
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June 17, 2012 2:50:54 PM

Best answer selected by kimimiko.
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September 2, 2012 6:37:47 PM

Hi again
It seems I got the router info wrong... well actually I don't know at all :cry: 
I have a ADSL2+ wireless gateway, and as stated above, I have an Ethernet port in the wall of my room.
Will I be able to create a wireless network?

Another thing- I don't think the ethernet ports in the room are of the same network as the wireless in the common room.

Btw my past question actually didn't go in vain; just one day after I got your reply a friend asked me to setup a wireless network in her room too, but her one had LAN and WAN, so I was able to set it up all right, thanks to your instructions :lol: 
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September 3, 2012 8:50:24 PM

eibgrad said:
You don't need to have the router connected to the wall over the WAN to change its network. You just need to connect a PC to the router over a LAN port, access the administrative interface (most likely http://192.168.1.1 ), and find the basic setup section. Obviously I can't tell you exactly since I don't know anything about your router. But somewhere there you'll see the router's IP (192.168.1.1), a netmask (255.255.255.0), etc. Typically if you change the IP of the router to say 192.168.2.1, save and reboot, the router will automatically change the whole router, including the DHCP server, to the same network (192.168.2.x/255.255.255.0). It's pretty simple.


Hi again

It seems I got the router info wrong... well actually I don't know at all Ihave aADSL2+ wireless gateway, and as stated above, I have an Ethernet port in the wall of my room. Will I be able to create a wireless network?

Another thing- I don't think the ethernet ports in the room are of the same network as the wireless in the common room.

Btw my past question actually didn't go in vain; just one day after I got your reply a friend asked me to setup a wireless network in her room too, but her one had LAN and WAN, so I was able to set it up all right, thanks to your

instructions
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!