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How to eliminate echo and humming from voice recording?

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Anonymous
September 20, 2005 5:02:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Hello,

How can I eliminate echo (hollowness) from a voice recording? The echo
is due to the confined space of where the voice recording was done.

Also, how can I eliminate the pervasive humming sound of my computer
hardrive fan that is present throughout the entire 4 hour voice
recording?

I did the 4 hour voice recording in my confined office using an Apex
415 mic through Sound Forge 7.0.

I looked at other posts and tried using the Noise Gate... this helped
with the humming somewhat... what about the EQ? Is there something I
can do using that?

My knowledge of audio terminology is limited so the help menu of Sound
Forge 7.0 is like trying to read a forgein language.

Any solutions for my challenges via Sound Forge 7.0 would be fantastic.
Thanks in advance...

Jay
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 6:05:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

It should be possible to get rid of most of the humming with the
denoise function of audition/cooledit. This will generally give better
results than gating.
Gating the signal to get rid of the echo is a way but won't get rid of
the hollowness of the sound.

Theoretically it should be possible to eliminate echo with a technique
called deconvolution. The best examples I've seen of this, however,
work on recordings made with several mics. No regular software I know
allows deconvoluting signals, and if anything the process would be
extremely processor-intensive.

Ideally you would've tackled the problem by preventing it altogether -
it is generally more time-effective than to solve the problems
afterwards. Is this a 'staged' recording (e.g. an audio-book)? If so,
re-recording may be your best option.

You can dampen the recording space with foam, blankets, pillows and
whatnot to prevent echo, and move any unwanted noise sources (including
the computer) out of the recording room. Be sure to close any doors and
windows to make the room as quiet as possible. Before recording, take
the time to just listen to the room for a minute to see if you missed
any other noise sources. When you can record close to the mic, this
will allow you to turn down the pre-amp, reducing unwanted
ambient-noises. When needed, use a pop-filter to prevent those popping
P's and B's.

It may cost an extra day but the quality will be untouchable by any
'fix it later' approach.
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 2:33:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<bosspayn@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1127203364.508239.274430@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Hello,
>
> How can I eliminate echo (hollowness) from a voice recording? The echo
> is due to the confined space of where the voice recording was done.
>
> Also, how can I eliminate the pervasive humming sound of my computer
> hardrive fan that is present throughout the entire 4 hour voice
> recording?
>
> I did the 4 hour voice recording in my confined office using an Apex
> 415 mic through Sound Forge 7.0.
>
> I looked at other posts and tried using the Noise Gate... this helped
> with the humming somewhat... what about the EQ? Is there something I
> can do using that?
>
> My knowledge of audio terminology is limited so the help menu of Sound
> Forge 7.0 is like trying to read a forgein language.
>
> Any solutions for my challenges via Sound Forge 7.0 would be fantastic.
> Thanks in advance...
>
> Jay

I know of no way to remove the effects of the room sound as you describe it.
Take the time to re-record. Either treat your office accoustically to
remove hard-wall reflections or move to another/better room. Don't record
in close proximity of the computer unless you want to hear it. You can beat
yourself to death trying to make software correct a bad recording. You'll
spend hours/days and be not much better off than when you started. On the
other hand, if the content cannot be replaced, live with it and avoid the
same mistakes next time.

Steve King
Related resources
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 3:39:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<bosspayn@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1127203364.508239.274430@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com
> Hello,
>
> How can I eliminate echo (hollowness) from a voice
> recording? The echo is due to the confined space of where
> the voice recording was done.

Hope and pray that the echo is concentrated at certain
frequencies that you can attenuate without hurting the
recording too much.

> Also, how can I eliminate the pervasive humming sound of
> my computer hardrive fan that is present throughout the
> entire 4 hour voice recording?

Pretty doable in Audition/CEP with all of its noise
reduction options.

basically fans create noise that tends to be at discrete
frequencies. Narrowband equalization can attenuate them with
minimal (but probably audible) damage to the sounds you
want. Some software lets you sample the noise and uses its
analysis of that to design the required filter for you.

Sounds like you are up to some meatball surgery.

I know nothing about SF.
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 5:21:25 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

<bosspayn@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>How can I eliminate echo (hollowness) from a voice recording? The echo
>is due to the confined space of where the voice recording was done.

You can't, really. Sometimes downward expension to chop the end of the
reverb tails off can help a little.

>Also, how can I eliminate the pervasive humming sound of my computer
>hardrive fan that is present throughout the entire 4 hour voice
>recording?

You can take it to someone with good broadband noise reduction tools
and let them do it. But the room problems will probably make it harder
to deal with the noise issues.

>I did the 4 hour voice recording in my confined office using an Apex
>415 mic through Sound Forge 7.0.

Better luck next time. This is why it is important to monitor your
recordings while tracking. If you can't hear what you're doing, you're
apt to miss all sorts of stuff like this, and wind up wasting your time
making unusable recordings.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
Anonymous
September 20, 2005 10:00:35 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

bosspayn wrote ...
> Any solutions for my challenges via Sound Forge 7.0 would
> be fantastic. Thanks in advance...

The main solutions to your challenges are acoustical and have
nothing to do with your software. It would likely be far less
expensive to eliminate the problems before they reach your
microphone.
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 3:21:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

bossp...@yahoo.com wrote:

> My knowledge of audio terminology is limited so the help menu of Sound
> Forge 7.0 is like trying to read a forgein language.
>
> Any solutions for my challenges via Sound Forge 7.0 would be fantastic.

Get the book "Sound Forge Power" by Scott Garrigus.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B00005Y1O...

rd
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 3:29:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Mr.T wrote:

> I know you use Audition Arny, but the OP already uses Sound Forge 7 which
> does pretty much the same things as Audition, including a number of noise
> reduction methods and heaps of filtering options.
>
> > I know nothing about SF.
>
> Similar features to Audition for stereo wave editing.

As powerful as SF is there are some functions that
CEP/Audition will do better or easier. Primarily in
the area of noise reduction the included processing
functions seem to be more straightforward in Audition.
<3rd party DX plugins notwithstanding>

I still prefer Forge for most standard editing tasks.

rd
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 9:40:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Richard Crowley" <rcrowley@xpr7t.net> wrote in message
news:11j1c5oe7ukugde@corp.supernews.com...
> bosspayn wrote ...
>> Any solutions for my challenges via Sound Forge 7.0 would be fantastic.
>> Thanks in advance...
>
> The main solutions to your challenges are acoustical and have nothing to
> do with your software. It would likely be far less expensive to eliminate
> the problems before they reach your microphone.

It's practically impossible to satisfactorily remove the sound caused by
recording in an improperly treated small room. I agree. Fix the problem at
the source.
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 11:58:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.pro.live-sound,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

Arny Krueger wrote:
> I know nothing

" "

--
re-configure the solar matrix in parallel for endothermic propulsion
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 1:33:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Tue, 20 Sep 2005 11:33:47 -0400, Steve King wrote
(in article <irWdnfca6KITtq3eRVn-vg@comcast.com>):

> <bosspayn@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1127203364.508239.274430@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>> Hello,
>>
>> How can I eliminate echo (hollowness) from a voice recording? The echo
>> is due to the confined space of where the voice recording was done.
>>
>> Also, how can I eliminate the pervasive humming sound of my computer
>> hardrive fan that is present throughout the entire 4 hour voice
>> recording?
>>
>> I did the 4 hour voice recording in my confined office using an Apex
>> 415 mic through Sound Forge 7.0.
>>
>> I looked at other posts and tried using the Noise Gate... this helped
>> with the humming somewhat... what about the EQ? Is there something I
>> can do using that?
>>
>> My knowledge of audio terminology is limited so the help menu of Sound
>> Forge 7.0 is like trying to read a forgein language.
>>
>> Any solutions for my challenges via Sound Forge 7.0 would be fantastic.
>> Thanks in advance...
>>
>> Jay
>
> I know of no way to remove the effects of the room sound as you describe it.
> Take the time to re-record. Either treat your office accoustically to
> remove hard-wall reflections or move to another/better room. Don't record
> in close proximity of the computer unless you want to hear it. You can beat
> yourself to death trying to make software correct a bad recording. You'll
> spend hours/days and be not much better off than when you started. On the
> other hand, if the content cannot be replaced, live with it and avoid the
> same mistakes next time.
>
> Steve King
>
>

Spend the money on a music library. Put music under your tracks and see if
you can hide the noise.

Ty Ford



-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 4:28:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

"Arny Krueger" <arnyk@hotpop.com> wrote in message
news:hoKdnfT-NLgCsa3eRVn-1g@comcast.com...
> > Also, how can I eliminate the pervasive humming sound of
> > my computer hardrive fan that is present throughout the
> > entire 4 hour voice recording?
>
> Pretty doable in Audition/CEP with all of its noise
> reduction options.

I know you use Audition Arny, but the OP already uses Sound Forge 7 which
does pretty much the same things as Audition, including a number of noise
reduction methods and heaps of filtering options.

> I know nothing about SF.

Similar features to Audition for stereo wave editing.

MrT.
Anonymous
September 21, 2005 5:30:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.pro.live-sound,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

George Gleason said:

>>>That is too bad, I liked Shultz George

>> Did you like Nixon Richard too?

>aamof no
>but I don't follow the refrence?

http://snipurl.com/huqc
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 12:55:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.pro.live-sound,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

George Middius <George_member@newsguy.com> wrote in
news:D gsft70170l@drn.newsguy.com:

> http://snipurl.com/huqc

if its not too much trouble please explain this
the link was dead, (Not found) thanks
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 12:55:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.pro.live-sound,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

George Gleason said:

> > http://snipurl.com/huqc

> if its not too much trouble please explain this
> the link was dead, (Not found) thanks

No, the link is fine. Did you copy & paste or did you try to re-type it?
Anonymous
September 22, 2005 3:02:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.audio.pro.live-sound,rec.audio.opinion,rec.audio.pro,rec.audio.tech (More info?)

George M. Middius <cmndr [underscore] george [at] comcast [dot] net> wrote
in news:iom3j1pp1prn7er6sfp4f0ic593hurrvsa@4ax.com:

>
>
> George Gleason said:
>
>> > http://snipurl.com/huqc
>
>> if its not too much trouble please explain this
>> the link was dead, (Not found) thanks
>
> No, the link is fine. Did you copy & paste or did you try to re-type it?
>
>
>
>
>

Cut and paste
but thats ok
it doesn't work for me
not worth any more effort
Peace
George
Anonymous
September 25, 2005 3:07:01 AM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

bosspayn@yahoo.com wrote:

> How can I eliminate echo (hollowness) from a voice recording?
> The echo is due to the confined space of where the voice
> recording was done.

No, it is a problem because the microphone was too far from the sound
source. Being too close also caused problems. What you should do is to
make a series of test recordings and learn where to place the mic for
the job.

> Also, how can I eliminate the pervasive humming sound of my computer
> hardrive fan that is present throughout the entire 4 hour voice
> recording?

Make your mind up, hum is a term used for LF noise, and harddrives
mostly cause high frequency noise. What you refer to is however probably
the combination of CPU fan and power supply fan,

> I did the 4 hour voice recording in my confined office using an Apex
> 415 mic through Sound Forge 7.0.

It follows from this that it will take approximately 480 minutes to fix
the recording by re-recording. It is the fastest and the best solution.

> I looked at other posts and tried using the Noise Gate...
> this helped with the humming somewhat...

I am confident that using a noise gate will cause worse problems than
not using one. Subtle expansion and careful use of multiple stages of
digital noise reduction may make the problem less obvious, but it may
also cause the voice to sound like the voice of a robot.

> what about the EQ? Is there something I can do using that?

Yes, you can alter the tonal balance in many ways, most of which will be
detrimental, this because noise from a computer is wideband in nature.

> My knowledge of audio terminology is limited so the help menu of Sound
> Forge 7.0 is like trying to read a forgein language.

I started using Cool Edit in 1999, and I am still only just learning.

> Any solutions for my challenges via Sound Forge 7.0 would be fantastic.

The fast here & now solution is to re-record and thereby fixing the
actual problem, which is that there was too far from the mic to the
mouth, try again with the distance being in the 8 to 12 inches range. Do
not speak directly at the mic, do not vary the distance and do not be
too close.

> Thanks in advance...

Homework: read the rec.audio.* FAQ. Locate Harvey Gersts site and go
visit http://www.digido.com. There is an example of what digital NR can
do on my site, but do be aware that it takes skill and many experiments
to learn to use powerful tools.

> Jay


Kind regards

Peter Larsen

--
*******************************************
* My site is at: http://www.muyiovatki.dk *
*******************************************
Anonymous
September 25, 2005 1:44:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

Ty Ford wrote:

> Do what Peter said.

Learn the words? At least that will eliminate the need for humming,
though sometimes humming can be kind of nice.
Anonymous
September 25, 2005 2:31:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.audio.tech,rec.audio.pro (More info?)

On Sat, 24 Sep 2005 17:07:01 -0400, Peter Larsen wrote
(in article <4335BFF5.4485B639@mail.tele.dk>):



Do what Peter said.

Ty Ford





-- Ty Ford's equipment reviews, audio samples, rates and other audiocentric
stuff are at www.tyford.com
!