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Network Setup to include all CAT5 Ports Live

Last response: in Networking
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July 11, 2012 4:06:10 PM

Hi All,

I'm very new to this website and like all forums, you should immediately research past posts in which I did. I saw some answers and some questions I have may need a more robust explanation.

I currently have five CAT5 ethernet ports throughout my house. The problem is all but one of those ports are cold. The only hot port is the one that Verizon (FioS) decided to use to create a network for my house.

I'm getting ready to switch to Comcast (whole other story for a later time) and decided that I will like to make all my Ethernet ports live.

There is a Structured Media Cabinet (SMC) in my garage. This is where all my connections meets. I bought a Motorola SURFboard SB6121 as my Modem. Also in my possession is a Cisco Linksys EA4500 Router and a Trendnet TEG-S50g Unmannaged 5 port Gigabit switch.

Here's part of the dillemma. With not knowing exactly the best practice in terms of connecting these to each other, I'm sort of stuck. I will like to have my Router inside the house (connected to a port) if possible. That way, I can continue to have wifi for some components (iPad, Mac, and iPhone). I will like to hardwire my XBOX, Television, Printer, etc.

First of all is it possible to set up my router to a port inside the house, vice downstairs in the SMC and work? The problem with having my router in the garage is that it will not give me a signal at all, especially sitting in the metal SMC.

Secondly, what wires do I connect to what device? I'm assuming when Comcast runs there own cable, I will connect to the modem, then ethernet cord from modem to switch, then by the look of the pics, what do I connect to the switch? Again, part of the goal here is to not have the router downstirs in the can. I'm sort of confused as to which of those cords go to the switch or do I need to punch more wires (the wires that are not connected with any connectors)?
Sorry if the pics are really big, I tried to resize it with no joy. Some pictures may have comments embedded.


SMC


Verizon Demarc


Leviton CAT5 Boards


CAT5 boards


Zoom of Patch


I hoped I explained everthing in a precise manner and hoped it makes explaining to me easier. If there is anything else that you need to know, please tell me. I appreciate anyone that has the patience with reading through and helping me on this matter. Thanks

Kevin

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July 11, 2012 4:57:20 PM

What most ppl would do is install the modem and router (and by extension, its switch) in the structured wiring box. That doesn't mean, however, that you have to have your wireless AP in that same box as well. Your typical consumer wireless router is really three separate components (switch, router, wireless AP) that have been integrated merely as a convenience. But you can buy all these components separately (and most businesses do). Or to save money, buy several integrated devices and only use those features you need. So for example, you could buy a cheap router (wireless or wired, but if wireless, disable its radio) and install it in the structured wiring box. You'd install the modem there as well and connect it to the router's WAN. Now plug all the runs to your various rooms into the router's LAN ports (switch). Finally, install one or more wireless APs throughout the various rooms in your home (you just patch its LAN port to the LAN port on the wall).
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July 11, 2012 6:39:43 PM

eibgrad said:
What most ppl would do is install the modem and router (and by extension, its switch) in the structured wiring box. That doesn't mean, however, that you have to have your wireless AP in that same box as well. Your typical consumer wireless router is really three separate components (switch, router, wireless AP) that have been integrated merely as a convenience. But you can buy all these components separately (and most businesses do). Or to save money, buy several integrated devices and only use those features you need. So for example, you could buy a cheap router (wireless or wired, but if wireless, disable its radio) and install it in the structured wiring box. You'd install the modem there as well and connect it to the router's WAN. Now plug all the runs to your various rooms into the router's LAN ports (switch). Finally, install one or more wireless APs throughout the various rooms in your home (you just patch its LAN port to the LAN port on the wall).



Thanks for your response.

So the switch I have is not needed? Based on what you said, the ports behind my router also acts as a switch? So setting up based on having the modem and a switch in the structured wiring box and connecting the CISCO router to the LAN Port in the wall wouldn't work?

Well based on your advice, I'll go out and buy a wired router and connect it down there with the modem. With that said, the dedicated switch has deemed not needed. Then I can connect my CISCO router to a LAN port in the wall.

Thanks for your insight.

Also, did you had the opportunity to look at the pictures? If so, do I pull the runs from the board on the telephone side, leaving the other end connected to the CAT5 board and connect those to the router?

Again, Thanks. I really appreciate it.
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July 12, 2012 9:49:43 PM

Thanks eibgrad,

Anyone else out there care to discuss?
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July 22, 2012 2:30:42 AM

Best answer selected by kcammie.
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