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Help on try to split my network

Hello guys. Due to my limited experience on setting up network. I may need a little help here, or just trying to learn something new from this. Ok, here is my question...

I have a cable modem which is hooked up with a wireless router to provide signal for my laptops. I will soon get myself a desktop. If I don't plan to purchase a wireless adapter for my desktop, is there a way to split the cable into two ways. One is for my wireless router and the other one will be wired into my new desktop; so both devices (wireless router and desktop) will use one cable modem. If so, is it going to reduce my internet speed?

Thank you guys for help :)
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about help split network
  1. does the router not have LAN ports?

    what model router is it
  2. Emerald said:
    does the router not have LAN ports?

    what model router is it


    The modem doesn't have a lan port. Only power and the port for internet cable.

    It's netgear cable modem CMD31T. Got it for free when installed my internet
  3. short answer is no

    you either need a wireless network card or a different router
  4. Emerald said:
    short answer is no

    you either need a wireless network card or a different router


    Ok, I thought there would be other options rather than those you've provided me with.
    Let's say what if the cable modem came with LAN ports?
    What is the real function of an ethernet cable splitter?
    For example here: http://www.amazon.com/C2G-Cables-37133-Splitter-Combiner/dp/B000Q5UMEI/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1342213676&sr=1-1&keywords=ethernet+cable+splitter

    http://www.amazon.com/Netgear-ProSafe-5-Port-Ethernet-Desktop/dp/B00002EQCW/ref=sr_1_4?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1342213676&sr=1-4&keywords=ethernet+cable+splitter

    Do they all require LAN ports to work?

    Thank you :)
  5. Best answer
    As Emerald suggests, you need a wireless router. You connect the router to the modem. The router then provides the wireless and wired ports you need for all your devices.

    [modem]<-- wire -->[wireless router]<-- wired/wireless -->[wired/wireless devices]

    That cable splitter is not what you think it is. All ethernet cables have 8 internal wires, but only 4 of those wires are used for 10/100Mbps ethernet connections. Manufacturers have taken advantage of that fact so you can run TWO ethernet connections over ONE ethernet cable. Specifically, the splitter takes the 4 usable wires from each ethernet cable and runs them over the 8 available wires of the single ethernet cable. You then use a second adapter at the other end so the 8 wires are once again split back into their respective 4 wires and two ethernet cables. So let’s say you already an ethernet cable running through your walls between two floors, and now need a second ethernet cable for some reason. Rather than pulling another ethernet cable through those same walls, you use the splitters at each end. That's why you always need to buy/use them in pairs, otherwise they’re useless. It’s a highly specialize device and rarely used. Most ppl mistakenly think it’s the equivalent of a switch, but it’s nothing like that.

    As far as that Netgear switch, it’s insufficient. A switch doesn’t allow you to SHARE the single public IP provided by your ISP. You need a *router*! Virtually all routers come w/ an integrated switch to get you started. You can daisy chain additional switches if you need more switched ports.
  6. eibgrad said:
    As Emerald suggests, you need a wireless router. You connect the router to the modem. The router then provides the wireless and wired ports you need for all your devices.

    [modem]<-- wire -->[wireless router]<-- wired/wireless -->[wired/wireless devices]

    That cable splitter is not what you think it is. All ethernet cables have 8 internal wires, but only 4 of those wires are used for 10/100Mbps ethernet connections. Manufacturers have taken advantage of that fact so you can run TWO ethernet connections over ONE ethernet cable. Specifically, the splitter takes the 4 usable wires from each ethernet cable and runs them over the 8 available wires of the single ethernet cable. You then use a second adapter at the other end so the 8 wires are once again split back into their respective 4 wires and two ethernet cables. So let’s say you already an ethernet cable running through your walls between two floors, and now need a second ethernet cable for some reason. Rather than pulling another ethernet cable through those same walls, you use the splitters at each end. That's why you always need to buy/use them in pairs, otherwise they’re useless. It’s a highly specialize device and rarely used. Most ppl mistakenly think it’s the equivalent of a switch, but it’s nothing like that.

    As far as that Netgear switch, it’s insufficient. A switch doesn’t allow you to SHARE the single public IP provided by your ISP. You need a *router*! Virtually all routers come w/ an integrated switch to get you started. You can daisy chain additional switches if you need more switched ports.



    Aha... thank you very much for such a specific answer. Actually my modem is connected to a wireless router. And the router does come with LAN ports. If I understand your concept right, connect the modem to my router first, then I wire an ethernet cable through one of the LAN ports on my wireless router to my desktop to provide signal.
  7. Yes, just make sure you connect the modem to the router's WAN port.
  8. eibgrad said:
    Yes, just make sure you connect the modem to the router's WAN port.


    Got that! Great, thank you so much :)
  9. Best answer selected by LS86.
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